EUPHONICS FOR WRITERS: PROFESSIONAL TECHNIQUES FOR FICTION WRITERS by @RayneHall #Bookreview

Euphonics For Writers: Professional Techniques for Fiction Authors (Writer's Craft Book 15)Euphonics For Writers: Professional Techniques for Fiction Authors by Rayne Hall
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Another winning book from Rayne Hall’s Writer’s Craft series. As Rayne explains this book is about learning how to touch your reader’s subconscious with subtle tricks. There are sounds which effect our psyche and choosing which words you write can influence how a reader feels. This can then enhance the reading experience and may lead to a positive review of your book.

Set in two parts, part 1 deals with the different feelings and sounds letters of the alphabet make to our subconscious. For instance words with “m” are warm and motherly and make us feel cosy, roll these words over in your head; Mother, warm, comfy, welcome, how did they make you feel?

Part 2 deals with sound placement and writing rhythm. Rayne discussed alliteration, consonance & assonance, sentence lengths, starter words, the use of repetition of words, asyndeton & polysyndeton (how to make a piece of writing fast or slow paced)

Even though I am not writing a book at the moment, I am excited to try out some of these techniques in simple everyday pieces I write.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

View all my reviews on Goodreads

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27 thoughts on “EUPHONICS FOR WRITERS: PROFESSIONAL TECHNIQUES FOR FICTION WRITERS by @RayneHall #Bookreview

  1. This sounds fascinating; I am sure shrewd advertising people use all these tricks, if that’s not the wrong word, so why not writers/bloggers? Think I will get this. If you see a surfeit of Ms in my next book, you’ll know why 😉

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    • Yes, advertisers use these techniques… some of them, anyway. Especially the ones related to sound placement and rhythm. Poets also use them. Strangely, fiction writers seem mostly unaware of these techniques. And yes, you can call them tricks. 🙂

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  2. Alliteration, consonance, and assonance come naturally to some writers; most of the time, we have to work at making our words sound more pleasing. I’m not sure that today’s readers notice or appreciate the beauty of language, but we writers do!

    Special thanks to Rayne Hall for all the books she’s written on the craft of writing–which is, when done with considerable care, an art. Pinned & shared. 🙂

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  3. You know, that’s quite interesting about the different feelings certain letter sounds invoke in our subconsciousness. Who studies this type of thing? 🙂
    @dino0726 from 
    FictionZeal – Impartial, Straightforward Fiction Book Reviews

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