Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT THE FLOWER SELLER by Ellie Holmes @EllieHWriter #wwwblogs

Today’s team review is from Alison, she blogs at http://alisonwilliamswriting.wordpress.com/

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Alison has been reading The Flower Seller by Ellie Holmes

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First of all, the blurb for this book is far too long. It makes me want to get out my red pen and start furiously cutting away. Hopefully it won’t put people off, because this is a lovely book.

Jessie is in her early forties, and is struggling to come to terms with her husband’s betrayal. She meets a younger man, but she isn’t sure if she can trust him either. The novel is told mostly from Jessie’s point of view, sometimes moving into her husband William’s viewpoint, and sometimes into the point of view of Owen, her younger lover.

I didn’t mind the point of view switches. It did add a new dimension when we saw things from William’s side. The switches are kept separate from each other, apart from on one occasion when the switch is a bit sudden and quite jarring.

Jessie is a great lead character, for the most part. At first I was one hundred per cent on her side. I have to say though, that as the book progressed, I felt less sympathy, and by the end, I was a bit irritated by her.

Having said that, it is nice to have a lead character who is a woman of a certain age. And a successful woman at that. The author does a great job of adding depth to Jessie; she’s a three-dimensional character with faults and with fears. And William and Owen are very real too.

My issue with Jessie is an issue that I find I have a lot recently with older female characters. Those faults she has certainly aren’t physical ones. She’s beautiful – as both men in her life continuously remind her. At one point she’s described as lithe. Yet she works long hours, seems to continuously drink wine and eats lots of lovely dinners, and never exercises. As a woman in my forties, I can’t identify with that. It genuinely made it very hard for me to feel sympathy for Jessie, to believe in her. Where’s her cellulite? Where are the wrinkles? How does she drink as much as she seems to and still manage to get up and do a fourteen hour day?

The writing is competent, smooth and, on the whole, technically good. There are a few irritating dialogue tags that should have been got rid of during editing, and a few moments of dialogue that didn’t quite ring true (again, something that should have been picked up in the editing). But the style is lovely, easy to read, and the narrative carries you along. Ellie Holmes is a talented story teller, and this is an enjoyable read, one I’d definitely recommend. I just wish I’d felt more in tune with Jessie, that I’d liked her more than I did.

Four out of five stars

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

NEW ENGLAND DREAMS by @PiaCCourtenay #YA #Romance @BrookCottageBks #TuesdayBookBlog

NEW COVER_FRONT150dpi_ MEDNew England Dreams is book 4 in the Northbrooke High series of #YA #Romance. This book would easily suit younger teenagers and is a quick easy read. Seventeen year old Sienna Randall has pink dreads and piercings, she’s on her way to America to stay with relatives for a few months after a traumatic split-up between her parents. On the same aeroplane is Northbrooke High’s No.1 Jock, clean-cut Kyle Everett on his way home from skiing in Europe. The pair get chatting and some how end up making out on the plane while the lights are low, but are soon in trouble with the crew and separated at arrivals.

Sienna is totally the opposite of Kyle’s normal girlfriends, and something about her makes him question his privileged lifestyle and the way it is heading. Thinking they would never see each other again they are both surprised when Sienna turns up at Kyle’s school. There follows lots of normal teenage behaviour, does he like me? Does she like me? With lost of resistance from local girls.

I wasn’t convinced by some of the dialogue, at times it was a little unnatural especially where the adults were involved and I didn’t believe that in today’s high health and safety times that a school would ever make a student responsible for organising the school skiing trip, with teachers just tagging along. However for the early teens YA reading audience, the main theme will be the romance side which will work well for this age group.

New England Dreams Tour Banner

Genre: YA contemporary romance (US high school setting, UK heroine)

Release Date: 25th July 2016

Book 4 of the Northbrooke High series (can be read as a standalone)

When opposites attract, can dreams come true?

Staying in New England for a few months is just what Sienna Randall needs after all the family problems she’s been dealing with at home in London. Romance is the last thing she’s expecting, so it’s a total surprise when she ends up kissing a guy she meets on the flight.

Kyle Everett is Sienna’s complete opposite –  he’s clean-cut and preppy, she has piercings and pink dreads. But he can’t resist making out with her. He is, after all, Northbrooke High’s number one player. Except Sienna’s different from other girls. He’s definitely expecting to see her again – until they’re separated by irate airline officials before he can get her number.

EXTRACT

Kyle smiled and changed the subject. ‘You got any more piercings then? You know, hidden ones?’ He wiggled his eyebrows at her and it looked so stupid she couldn’t help but smile back.

‘None of your business,’ she told him.

‘Oh, so you do? Now I’m curious.’

‘I do not. And even if I did, I wouldn’t show you.’

‘Oh, yeah? Hmm. So tell me, how does it feel to kiss with snake bites?’ He was suddenly staring at her mouth intently and Sienna felt a shiver run through her. God, but he was hot. Seriously hot. And he was so close. She was very tempted to just reach over and grab him.

And why not? No one would ever know.

She shook herself mentally, but some devil made her smile again. She looked up at him from under her lashes, the way she’d seen other girls do when they were flirting. She’d never managed it because she was too shy, but for some reason, she had no trouble doing it now. ‘You tell me,’ she said, the challenge clear in her voice.

His eyes opened wide and he drew in a sharp breath. Then he grinned. ‘Okay, you’re on.’

The next thing she knew, he had bent his head slightly to the side and captured her mouth with his in a long, slow kiss that almost melted her bones. He ran his tongue over the snake bites, nipping at one playfully, then kissed her again, properly, deeply. When he stopped he brought up a hand to cup her cheek. ‘I like it,’ he whispered. ‘A lot.’

So did Sienna, but she didn’t get a chance to reply, because he started kissing her again and this time he didn’t stop. Which was just as well, since she didn’t want him to. In fact, she didn’t come to her senses until some air steward pulled Kyle off her and she realised with flaming cheeks they’d ended up lying across all four middle seats, making out thirty thousand feet up in the sky.

‘What the hell do you think you’re doing?’ the crewman hissed, looking from one to the other.

Sienna wondered the same thing. She must have lost her mind.

Then fate throws them together once more, but when Sienna turns up in Kyle’s home room, neither admits to having met before. The chemistry between them is still there though – should they let it have free rein or should the attraction stay in their dreams?

BUY LINKS

AMAZON UK

AMAZON US

'Promote Me!' portrait

ABOUT PIA FENTON

Pia Fenton (who also writes as Christina Courtenay) is a chocoholic and confirmed couch potato, allergic to exercise of any kind (except maybe swimming). Although born in England, she has a Swedish mother and was brought up in Sweden so she was a bit of a mixed up kid. When she was a teenager, she moved with her family to Japan. From there she had the opportunity to travel in the Far East and other parts of the world, which was great fun. She also got to go to an American high school in Tokyo, together with kids of 138 other nationalities, and had the best time of her life!

Pia loves: reading and writing (YA obviously, but also anything historical, time slip and paranormal), dogs, genealogy, listening to rock music and doing various craft projects very badly. (It’s the trying that counts, right?)

Pia’s first YA novel New England Rocks (published by Choc Lit, Aug 2013) was short listed for The Romantic Novelists’ Association’s Award for Best Romantic Young Adult novel 2014. She’s also won some awards for her adult historical books.

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/christinacourtenayauthor/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/PiaCCourtenay

group twitter https://twitter.com/paisleypiranhas )

Goodreads Author Page: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4112359.Christina_Courtenay

Instagram: paisleypiranha

Blogs:   http://christinacourtenay.com/?page_id=278

              https://paisleypiranha.wordpress.com/

Websites: http://christinacourtenay.com/

                  https://sites.google.com/site/paisleypiranha/

Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/piacourtenay/
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Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT LA PETITE BOULAIN by @TudorTweep #TuesdayBookBlog

Today’s Team Review is from Noelle, she blogs at http://saylingaway.wordpress.com

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Noelle has been reading La Petite Boulain by G Lawrence

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La Petite Boulain is the first of a series of novels that will follow the life of Anne Boleyn (this is Above all Others; The Lady Anne Book 1) by Gemma Lawrence, author of The Bastard Princess and The Heretic Heir, both about the daughter of Henry VIII who would become Queen Elizabeth.

Anne Boleyn has been the subject of many books, either about her or about the Tudors. I counted 45 on Goodreads alone, by some impressive historical fiction authors such as Antonia Frasier, Philippa Gregory, Jean Plaidy, and Nora Lofts, to name a few. Many of them I have read because I am in love with the Tudor story, so I looked forward to this book.

In La Petite Boulain, the early years of Anne’s life are explored in depth, beginning with her happy childhood at Hever Castle in Kent with her sister Mary and her parents, who were courtiers to both Henry VII and Henry the VIII. While still very young, Anne sees Henry VIII and is infatuated with him, even from a distance. Women in those times were always used as pawns by their parents to enable the family to rise in the ranks. Anne is no exception and at the age of twelve is sent to is sent to the Court of Burgundy to be tutored in court ways and manners by Margaret of Austria. An intelligent girl, Anne not only learns the various arts and language necessary for a courtier, but becomes an astute observer of court life and politics. As a polished young woman, she is sent to the court of France to be a lady-in-waiting to the Princess Mary Tudor, Henry’s sister, who was to wed the aged Louis XII, king of France. Eventually, she is recalled to England by her father, following the death of the Duke of Buckingham. The reader is reminded of her fate, as the story is bookended by her thoughts and observances during her time in the Tower of London, awaiting her possible execution.

What I liked about this book: The author did an exception and detailed job with the historical detail, from the food to the clothing. I loved being immersed in the minutiae of life in that age. The politics of the royal courts, which defines everyone’s life and fate, are laid out crisply and understandably. Religion becomes a part of this, as Martin Luther teachings took root in the Christianity of the commoners. The reader becomes drawn into Anne’s life and sees through her observations and thoughts the fate and treatment of women during that time. It also becomes clear why Henry would become so infatuated with her, as she learns well the lesson of enticing men with beauty, talent and intelligence, but never succumbing to their entreaties and wants. This prompts the question of whether Anne was really in love with Henry, or simply playing the political role of desirable courtier to advance her family. The next book may provide an answer!

What I did not like: The book is very heavy in exposition, mainly very lengthy descriptions of Anne’s thoughts. The dialogue that interspersed these long passages was well-imagined and a relief. Also, Anne’s constant wonderment and delight in the beauty and magnificence of the royal courts and nobility was somewhat overwhelming and at times slightly tedious. I deliberately read The Heretic Heir right after completing this book, to see if this were the author’s writing style. It is, but The Heretic Heir, in my limited opinion, is somewhat better.

All in all, I do recommend La Petite Boulain. I came away with a clearer picture of Anne herself and the time in which she lived. She became a real person, and even those who are not rabid fans of the Tudors will love the historical detail and reach an understanding of this complicated woman. I look forward to the next book in the series.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

 

4 Quick Ways To Write A #BookReview And Overcome Your Fears #MondayBlogs

 

Authors WANT  Reviews

Make an Author's Day

Simple! How many times have you read pleas on social media for readers to write reviews? – Probably Loads.

Does the thought of writing a book review send you racing to the hills? – I can see plenty of you nodding in agreement.

WHAT holds you back?

Reading Soft edge

6 common replies:

I can’t write.

I can’t write paragraphs about a book.

I don’t know what to write.

I’m afraid of what people will think of my review.

I’m an author and don’t want a backlash on my own books.

I don’t have the time.

Let’s turn this around

I can’t write – I bet if you can read, you can write.

I can’t write paragraphs about a book – Good News, Amazon accepts one sentence reviews now as do many other sites.

I don’t know what to write – Ah! Quick Question – Why did you like or Dislike the book? Got an answer? Then you have a starting place.

I’m afraid of what people will think of my review – Facing fears is part of life, it is hard, but I bet you’ve faced much harder challenges. Authors LOVE reviews, other readers also like to read them to see if they agree or disagree. Every reader will get something different from their experience. An honest review from someone who genuinely read the book IS REALLY APPRECIATED.

I’m an author and don’t want a backlash on my own books – This one STOPS TOO MANY AUTHORS from writing book reviews and it shouldn’t. In fact if you are an author, one way to hone your writing skills is to READ, READ, READ and from this you will be noting what works, what doesn’t and you will have all the skill sets to write a review. IF YOU WRITE WITH HONESTY AND COMPASSION I can’t see an author would want revenge or to be labelled a TROLL, these are far and few amongst the millions of authors who GENUINELY WANT A REVIEW.

I don’t have the time – time is what you make of it and those who have this as their reply probably won’t have time to read this post, so we’ll say no more.

So BE BRAVE – make a promise that the next book you read you will write a review.

Not sure which star rating to use? Read more here

Goodreads Ratings                                                                                                                                                          

GoodreadsAmazon

Amazon Ratings

4 Quick Ways to Write a Review

  1. Go to Goodreads or your Amazon account. Start with a one liner. Can you include the genre? The lead characters? The setting? Say “I really enjoyed this book” or “The book didn’t work for me”.
  2. As above, this time write 4 sentences. Keep them honest and make them about your own thoughts from the book.
  3. If you wrote your review for Goodreads, copy and paste it to your Amazon account. Or vice-versa.
  4. Really, really stuck for something to say? Read some of the other reviews for the book, they might jog your memory about a point, but still make your own review honest and genuine.

Finding yourself in a loop of reviewing friend’s books, just so they review yours? Review swaps are never a good idea, they become shallow and very obvious to other readers and you will only end up feeling guilty if you can’t be honest. Draw a line, perhaps explain that you don’t wish to review books for friends and you won’t ask them to review yours in turn unless either party truly wishes to read the book. But that no one should feel obliged to review as a swap. You can still support them by buying a copy of their work, this way their reviews will be from REAL readers who have found and bought their books and in the long term will be the reading audience of tomorrow.

Check out my simple book review templates, written to encourage those NEW to reviewing who need to boost their confidence.

There is NO SELL BY Date on writing a review – read a book a while a go that you ALWAYS MEANT TO WRITE A REVIEW FOR? Feeling guilty that you didn’t write a review at the time? No Problemo! Write this in the opening line “I read this book a while ago.” An author will be SO pleased to get an honest review that they won’t mind if there was a time delay on your side.

Minstrel Loveheart

Go. Go forth and review.

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT OCCUPYING LOVE by Marilyn Chapman #WW2 #Guernsey #Romance

Today’s team review is from Terry, she blogs at http://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

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Terry has been reading Occupying Love by Marilyn Chapman

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Occupying Love by Marilyn Chapman

3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed by me as a member of Rosie Amber’s Review Team

Occupying love is a historical romance set in Guernsey during the occupation by the Nazis during the second world war. Lydia Le Page returns to Guernsey from England on a momentous day: the first bombing on British soil during the war.

Lydia is, thus, trapped on Guernsey and has to put on hold her plans to train as a pharmacist. Happily reunited with her best friend, Maggie, and having met the mysterious new rector, Martin Martell, life seems bearable even though Lydia feels annoyed by the way some are more accepting of the island’s fate than others, particularly Maggie, who is quite taken with the German soldiers.

The fates of Lydia’s family take a turn for the worse when Germans decide to occupy not only the island but also their house, forcing them to lodge with friends. Lydia takes a job that means she gets to know Martin better, though both his activities and his personality remain something of a conundrum to her. Then another suitor enters the arena…

I think this is a book for an older readership, as the tone is one of the British pulling together against the enemy, with a fair bit of domestic detail. The characterisation and dialogue are reminiscent of 1950s films about the war, so it would appeal to readers who enjoy the current popularity of nostalgia orientated books, and/or who live in or have some knowledge of Guernsey

The book is well presented, and competently edited.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

The Automation by GB Gabbler @CircoFootnotes #MythPunk #BookReview #SundayBlogShare

The Automation (Circo del Herrero series, #1)The Automation by G.B. Gabbler
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The Automation is the first book in a series and is a novel written in a style paralleling an epic Greek poem. It has footnotes throughout and uses the fourth wall technique of speaking directly to the audience at points during the prose.

The story begins with Odys Odelyn meeting a strangely dressed man who engages him in conversation, gives him a strange coin and then commits suicide right in front of him. Odys and his sister Odissa are in their 20’s they share an apartment and are library assistants, it is later revealed that they are twins. Their father has a financial hold over them and Odissa leaves for a meeting to keep up their end of the contract to keep their money flowing.

Shocked by the suicide of Pepin Pound, Odys becomes ill, but wakes to find a strange women in his apartment. She discloses that she is an Automaton and represents his soul, they take energy from each other and neither can survive without the other. Maud drip feeds Odys information, he is very wary of her, rightfully distrusting of her. Others are curious about the couple and Dorian and Fletcher break into the apartment, sent by “Mother” to find out how much Pepin told Odys. But Odys is in the dark and soon finds himself thrown into a world of Gods, humans and their Automatons.

When Odissa returns, the group try to keep her apart from Odys, they need to know if she too is a pawn in the bigger plans of Vulcan and who else is pulling strings. They go to extremes to erase traces of their existence. There are lots of twists and turns, sub plots, and characters to keep you on your toes, yet the slow pace of the book and the distracting side stories also made it wearisome.

The author sprinkles in great lines like; “The grey clouds had decided to shake out a little bit of snow” and amusing lines like “The muses do know how to recycle a concept”. At other times I felt the author wanted to shock the reading audience with both his language and characters, pushing the reader to their limitations.

This isn’t an easy read, more a niche market piece for those who don’t mind their read being like an author’s experiment with the written word. For me it was an exhausting read, trying to follow all the madness in the story threads, the book ends in preparation for the next in the epic series, it just didn’t work for me.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

View all my reviews On Goodreads

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT SILENCED JUSTICE by @JBroadmeadow #Thriller #SundayBlogShare

Today’s Team Review is from Cathy, she blogs at http://betweenthelinesbookblog.com

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Cathy has been reading Silenced Justice by Joe Broadmeadow

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I haven’t read the first in the series and there were one or two moments when I was left wondering about certain aspects of the back story. It didn’t really detract from my enjoyment of this book although it took a little while to get my head round all the characters. Once I was into the story, though, it held my attention completely as the pace accelerated and the drama and suspense built.

Josh Williams is a Lieutenant in the Special Investigations Unit of the Providence Police.The story, set in East Providence, Rhode Island, begins with an attempt on the life of Keira, Josh’s wife, while she’s driving his truck to work. As Josh begins an investigation into the two men responsible, his former boss, Chris Hamlin who now runs a private investigations company, asks him to look into an old case. The niece of one of the other two women who work with Chris, wants some information on her biological father. Darnell Grey was arrested in 1972 for rape and murder and was subsequently beaten to death in prison before he could stand trial. It’s a chilling scenario of racism at its worst, combined with a tense and explosive prison system.

The investigations intensify and the more Josh uncovers, the murkier and more dangerous it all gets. The Justice System failed, manipulating evidence and witnesses, and corruption is widespread. An unscrupulous and disturbing conspiracy is uncovered layer by layer, involving government, the police and organised crime lords. It’s a horrifying but convincing sequence of events.

I love the skilfully created, complex plot, with lots of strands all coming together in a great ending, leaving the way open for more. The characters are all well defined and likeable, or not as the case may be. The narrative and dialogue are believable (unfortunately so in the case of the 70s police and government officials) and realistic. I like Joe Broadmeadow’s writing style, how he shows the evident camaraderie between Josh and his colleagues with sarcastic and humorous interaction. It’s obvious the author knows his subject and setting which adds to the authenticity.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT RUSTY GOLD by Christine Campbell @campbama #Mystery

Today’s team review is from Liz, she blogs at https://lizannelloyd.wordpress.com/

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Liz has been reading Rusty Gold by Christine Campbell

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Rusty Gold by Christine Campbell

Rusty Gold is Book 3 of the stories of Mirabelle, the Reluctant Detective. In Book 1 we had seen, Mirabelle’s daughter, Summer, choose to leave home without warning. We followed the search for her all over Edinburgh and Mirabelle’s determination to find her daughter despite her sorrow and fears. In the second book, Mirabelle has become the person, people in the area seek out, when they are searching for missing family members but in Rusty Gold, after four and a half years have passed, she has lost the confidence and wish to go on investigating for others. She sacks her volunteer assistant, Kay, and wallows in her loneliness.

But other people don’t give up on Mirabelle. Her larger than life determination and personality need to be revived and the turning point is when she hears that the dying mother of her long lost friend, Esme, needs her help. Esme and her young friend, are in great danger, travelling around the island of Skye in an old campervan, unaware that dangerous criminals are after them. Encouraged by the return of Detective Inspector Sam Burns into her life, Mirabelle asks Kay to accompany her and the two unlikely heroines try to save the day.

This book draws many threads from the earlier books together and we finally learn the full story of Summer’s conception and birth and how much Mirabelle loved her, despite her inability to be a good mother. But the last few chapters are a thrilling adventure among the beautiful countryside of Skye, where all the women in this character driven series come into their own. There is definitely a conclusion but there are also hints of further investigations for Mirabelle. It is difficult to think of any other books quite like these and they could ideally be turned into a TV series.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

 

Rosie’s #Bookreview team #RBRT TO SWIM BENEATH THE EARTH by Ginger Bensman #Inca #fridayreads

Today’s team review is from E.L. Lindley, she blogs at http://lindleyreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

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E.L has been reading To Swim Beneath The Earth by Ginger Bensman

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To Swim Beneath the Earth by Ginger Bensman is both an original and compelling novel that cleverly combines 1970’s US culture with that of South America in the 1500s. Not only is the story impeccably written, it also displays an impressive historical knowledge.

 

The book begins in Colorado in 1973 when the protagonist Megan Kimsey has just lost her father. Megan has always been regarded by her family as highly strung due to her random spates of clairvoyance and an inexplicable knowledge of the Inca Empire and its people. Only Megan’s father understands her and before his death purchased a ticket for her to travel to South America in a quest for answers about her troubling mental state.

 

Megan is a great character and I loved Bensman’s depiction of her family life. Her mother is a cold, unloving woman and her relationship with Megan is toxic and damaging. Bensman presents us with the dynamics of the dysfunctional Kimsey family in a way that is both heart rending and darkly funny.

 

The structure of the novel is complex and extremely effective which is indicative of Bensman’s strong writing skills. Once Megan travels to South America, she increasingly becomes connected to the past. We are given flashbacks to the time of the Incas where Megan takes on the identity of a man called Illapa. As Megan becomes consumed by the past and starts to resent the intrusion of the present, Bensman cleverly recreates that sense of tension for her readers. At crucial points in the narrative, she drags us back to 1973 as Megan’s consciousness returns to her, piquing our curiosity and leaving us desperate to find out what is going to happen.

 

Bensman’s particular strength, in my opinion, is her characterisation. Megan is a wonderfully prickly character who disappears at the first sign of conflict. She describes herself as a “social coward”. Bensman also creates excellent potential villains such as the obnoxious therapist, Dr Vickers, who Megan’s mother engages to work with Megan. He is constantly looming in the wings ready to perform an intervention which provides both humour and horror in equal measure.

 

There is also a really strong sense of place particularly once Megan travels to South America. Even in the 1974 sections, Bensman conveys a society that is steeped in ancient ways and wisdoms as personified by Megan’s friend Koyam, a medicine woman. Bensman’s knowledge of the Inca civilisation is such that it brings the period alive for the reader and makes us feel as though we are actually there.

There are so many heart breaking events in the story which are genuinely moving. As a child, Megan babysits for a little girl who suffers a misfortune that almost brought me to tears. Likewise Megan’s relationship with her young son when she is in the role of Illapa is emotionally charged and poignant.

 

I really loved this novel and found it entertaining, intelligent and thought provoking. It raises questions of reincarnation and a spirit world which I enjoyed exploring. Ultimately Megan is unable to find her place in the world until she has lain the past to rest.

 

This is not a novel that fits easily into any one genre but I believe there is something to captivate everyone. If you’re looking for a new read and fancy something a little bit different then I wholeheartedly recommend To Swim Beneath the Earth.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT THE EDGE OF THE CEMETERY by @MMillmore #Thriller #Ghosts

Today’s team review is from Teri, she blogs at http://teripolen.com/

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Teri has been reading The Edge Of The Cemetery by Margaret Millmore

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Let me start by saying I didn’t read the first book in this series, but the author includes some background information in this novel, so I wasn’t completely lost, and feel it could also be read as a standalone.

The whole concept of an international covert organization of ghost killers intrigued me from the start – then you throw in secret vaults, old diaries, and mysterious prophecies?  Yes, please.  I liked how there are both ‘good’ and ‘bad’ ghosts and the way a person can be haunted for a lifetime – that definitely gives the ghost killers job security.  The way the story develops is also intriguing, as George discovers connections between various hauntings and people.  George is likable, but flat, and I didn’t feel as if I had as good a grasp on his character as Billy or some other supporting characters.  The author did a wonderful job with Calvin’s character – he was equally disturbing and creepy.

The story begins and ends with exciting action sequences, but the middle is predominantly information gathering and sharing, making the pacing a little uneven for my taste.  I was also overwhelmed with the sheer number of characters (there were many mentioned, even though some didn’t appear in the book) and had to backtrack several times to remind myself who they were.  At the beginning of the book, there are some grammar and tense errors, but the last 80% or so seemed better edited.

I’d classify The Edge of the Cemetery as more of a supernatural thriller – and if you’re a fan, this is a book you’d enjoy – but with the mention of ghost killers, ghosts, and demons, I was hoping it would be heavier on the horror.  But I’m probably in the minority on that preference.

I received a copy of this book through Rosie’s Book Review Team in exchange for an honest review.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com