Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #Shortstory Collection More Glimpses by @HughRoberts05

Today’s team review is from Teri, she blogs here https://teripolen.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Teri has been reading More Glimpses by Hugh Roberts

What an eclectic collection of short stories!  There’s something for everyone – horror, comedy, science fiction, mystery, paranormal.  Some are a scant few paragraphs, while others span several pages.  My reactions to these stories ran the gamut – laughter, shock, sadness, surprise.  The author has quite an imagination, and uses human nature and tendencies and our dependence on modern technology in clever ways.

All are a delight to read, but some that stuck with me are The Tunnel – such an unexpected ending, and I laughed out loud; Floral Hall – so sweet and melancholy; The Right Choice – words can have different, and sometimes very literal, meanings; The Hole – karma occasionally delivers in the most divine ways; and Easter Bunny Cake – I’ll never look at carrot cake the same way again.

Whatever your preferred genre, you’ll find it in this compilation of chilling, humorous, and unpredictable tales.

I received a copy of this novel from the author through Rosie’s Book Review Team.

Book description

Do you believe in fairies at the bottom of the garden? Or know the real truth about what lurks inside every mobile phone? Would you steal items from a blind person, or send your neighbours on a time travelling adventure fraught with danger and menace to save the human race from a bug? How about staying in a sleepy village where many murders have taken place or coming to the aid of royalty while out shopping?

These are just some of the subjects covered in the second collection of short stories and flash fiction from author and writer, Hugh W. Roberts.

‘More Glimpses’ gives the reader an opportunity to take a peek into the lives of normal, everyday people whose lives are all on a path full of twists, turns and unexpected endings. However, it’s not only about the humans; nothing escapes the extraordinary journeys Hugh has planned for you. If you are a lover of shows such as ‘Black Mirror’ or ‘The Twilight Zone’ then you’re in for another exciting trip in this second collection from Hugh. Come and meet the characters who had no idea their lives were about to be turned upside-down. Enjoy the ride!

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

44436407

 

Rosie’s #Bookreview of #YA #RomanticSuspense #shortstory An Object Of Desire by Jenny Twist

An Object of DesireAn Object of Desire by Jenny Twist

3 stars

An Object Of Desire is a young adult romantic suspense short story. It is set in the exotic location of Morocco. Hannah and Rea are life-long friends who are enjoying a week’s holiday. While in the market, Rea buys a heavily bejewelled necklace from a bargain basket. At their hotel and during the next day, Hannah feels as though they are being watched. But what could two poor students possibly have that warrants the attention of creepy men?

A sweet little story in a lovely setting with a nod to both Indiana Jones and James Bond, and a fine sense of place.

Note: when I agreed to review this, I didn’t realise that it was a short story.  One reason that I usually avoid shorts is that I prefer a longer storyline, one that I can really get into; thus, I am not the ideal person to review this, but I am sure short story lovers will enjoy it.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book description

Hannah and Rea, on holiday in Tangiers are disturbed to discover that two sinister looking characters are following them. Then they meet the mysterious Toby who is himself following the stalkers. He wants to know why the men are interested in the girls. But the girls have no idea. They are not too worried, since the following day they are moving on to Chefchouen. He says he will take them himself, secretly. Is he what he says he is? Or is he part of the problem?
All seems well until Rea disappears.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

43892575

Rosie’s #Bookreview Of #Histfic #Romance The Duke And The Enchantress By @PaullettGolden

The Duke and The Enchantress (The Enchantresses, #2)The Duke and The Enchantress by Paullett Golden

4 stars

The Duke And The Enchantress is book two of The Enchantresses historical romance series.

The book is set during 1790 in Northumberland. The story opens with newlyweds Charlotte and Drake, as they travel home from London.

With only a month of courtship before their hasty marriage, Charlotte is anxious about the future. She realises that the couple know very little about each other, and she is frightened about what she may be expected to undertake in her role as Duchess.

Upon arrival at Drake’s home, Lyonn Manor, Charlotte is introduced to his mother, a woman who makes it very clear that she disapproves of her son’s choice of wife. Feeling lost, alone and bullied by Drake’s dragon like mother, Charlotte almost despairs that she will never achieve the type of married life that she once dreamed of.

Readers of the series were introduced to Charlotte and Drake in book one; now we get to see them in a flip-side setting. If you’ve read book one, like me, you may have already formed your opinions of them. This book, however, shows a very different side to the couple. We get a chance to understand their characters deeply. I’m pleased with how my impressions changed between the two books; I quite disliked them at times in the first story, so this is a clever turnaround.

There’s also a musical sub-plot which works well, particularly with how the author linked it to the whims and fashions of society. It brought an unusual element to this genre. I’m enjoying this series, and am hoping that Drake’s sister will get to star in her own story very soon.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book description

Some fairy tales begin with the kiss.

​Drake Mowbrah, the Duke of Annick, needed a wife. After choosing an acceptable bride, he traps himself in a marriage of convenience and must tap his creativity to woo his frigid wife and fuel her passion. Drake battles scandals, duels, and his own carefully crafted reputation to win her heart.

Charlotte Trethow dreamt of a fairy tale marriage to the perfect man. When she marries the Duke of Annick, all her dreams should have come true, but no one told her happily ever after doesn’t start with wedding bells. Charlotte is thrust into a world with a plotting housekeeper, an interfering despot, and an unconventional husband.

This is the love story of Charlotte and Drake as they turn a marriage of convenience into a fairy tale romance.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #Psychological #Suspense Murder Undone by Robin Storey

Today’s team review is from Terry, she blogs here https://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

#RBRT Review Team

Terry has been reading Murder Undone by Robin Storey

42904322

3.5 stars

This book starts well, with main character Eva poisoning her cheating husband.  Fast forward twenty years: she’s married again, and living with the fall-out.  Except she can’t deal with it; she drinks too much, and goes into bars to pick up men for casual sex.  Then she is offered a chance to go back in time, still retaining her memories of her ‘real’ life, and not murder Cheating Charlie after all….

I found this author’s style pretty readable; I’d suddenly realise I’d galloped through 10 pages or so, without thinking about stopping to make notes, which is a good sign.  I was moderately drawn in when I first started to read, but as soon as Eva got a chance to go back in time, I thought, ah—now I’m interested!

The story continued to zip along in a readable fashion, but I did have some problems with it.  Eva’s character seemed more like a vehicle for the plot that the other way round; I never believed in her.  One minute she is the pampered, submissive wife of a millionaire businessman, the next she is daredevil sleuth, able to talk her way into any private location, and mixing with the criminal underworld without turning a hair, to the extent of having sex with them for information (and enjoying it despite the guy having had a knife to her throat, but I’m not even going to go there; the cocaine she’d taken, alone, would make her paranoid and agitated in this situation).

I was dubious about some dialogue (the way one of the female characters talks about sex would make Samantha from Sex and the City cringe) and unconvinced by some events; for instance, before she goes back in time, Eva is around 60 years old, but gets hit on/approached for casual sex every time she enters a bar to have a drink.  However glamorous and well-kept a woman of that age may be, I found this a little unlikely.

One other point is something the author might want to consider for future work of this genre.  Later in the book, Eva is caught driving under the influence of cocaine.  There was a detailed chapter about her court appearance, ending with the news report about it on TV.  Why not just cut the whole court thing, and start the chapter with the news report, ending with a paragraph or two about how she felt, watching it broadcast to the world?  That would have given all the information the reader needed, and let them get on with the more juicy stuff, like infidelity, deteriorating marriage and underworld dealings …

… because it is a rip-roaring tale, and not badly put together at all, generally.  The basic idea is great, though I didn’t feel enough use was made of the fact that she was living her life over again; I expected more references to the past, and perhaps the steering of other events, too.  It’s a bit like a watered-down Jackie Collins (that’s a compliment, by the way!), but, alas, I need to be convinced by and become totally involved with the characters in order to really enjoy a book, and Eva never came alive to me.

To sum up: the author has much of the skill and writing style for this genre, but it still needs a bit of fine tuning!

Book description

Wealthy socialite Eva Dennehy murdered her first husband Charlie because he was planning to leave her for his mistress. Even her marriage to kind-hearted Edgar can’t blot out her remorse or fill the gap Charlie has left in her life.

When Eva is offered the opportunity to travel back in time and undo her crime as penance, she accepts – what does she have to lose? Back in her old life with Charlie, her passion for him surpassed only by her torment at his infidelity, she is more determined than ever to prevent him from leaving her.

But Eva discovers a sinister side to Charlie she never knew before, and her plan plunges her into a world of crime and depravity. She soon realizes she has even more to lose this time around.

If you love complex, flawed characters, simmering tension and suspense with a twist of noir, you’ll love Robin Storey’s novel of jealousy and betrayal.

Scroll up and click the Buy Button now to immerse yourself in this story of the dark side of love.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

42904322

Rosie’s #Bookreview of Regency #Romance Her Midnight Sin by @sofie_darling @SoulMatePublish

Her Midnight Sin (A Shadows and Silk Novel)Her Midnight Sin by Sofie Darling

4 stars

Her Midnight Sin is a Regency romance. Callie is a widow, who currently runs Wyldcombe Grange in Devon. It’s part of Viscount St. Alban’s estate, and one he wishes to sell off. But it’s Callie’s home and she’s poured her heart into making it turn a profit; she can’t stand the thought of losing it all. In her haste to raise the funds to buy the property herself, Callie strikes a deal with a notorious pirate.

John Nylander is a law-abiding captain of The Fortuyn. An orphan, he was raised by Viscount St. Alban’s sea-faring family. Chance circumstances and a bout of malaria have him sent to Wyldcombe Grange to convalesce. Once recovered, he admires the way Callie runs the estate; it would be just the place he would like to have for himself.

To Callie, Nylander is the very attractive enemy; a man who has the means to take away her precious home. She’ll do anything to stop that happening.

Set on the rugged coast of North Devon, this is a romance full of passion and heart-ache. I like stories with a connection to the sea and the pirate theme was an added bonus. The romance worked well and I admired Callie’s determination to keep her home. Ideal for those who enjoy this genre.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book description

Like a vengeful Norse god, Captain John Nylander has come from the sea to steal the only home that Callie has ever known. And that might not be all he’s after.

Can a Viking…

Orphaned as a child, Nylander has never known a real home. Now he is ready to leave the dangers of his past behind and put down the roots he has always longed for. The only thing standing in his way is a lanky aristocratic lady who is more at home on the farm than in the ballroom. And she has secrets…

And a Viscountess…

Callie, the Dowager Viscountess St. Alban, has poured all her energy into making Wyldcombe Grange her home. Managing an estate is not what she dreamed of, but her late husband’s rejection made it clear that love and a family would never be hers. Now she may lose even that to the sinfully handsome Captain. But Nylander is making her dream again…

Turn passion into love?

Nylander inspires a recklessness in Callie that she can’t control. Soon she finds herself conspiring with pirates and contemplating midnight trysts with the very Viking who has turned her life upside down. For Nylander, being with Callie embodies everything he’s always wanted—home. As midnight strikes, will all their secret, sinful dreams come true?

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT Icelandic #Histfic #Mystery STORYTELLERS by @bjornlarssen #TuesdayBookBlog

Today’s team review is from Terry, she blogs here https://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

#RBRT Review Team

Terry has been reading Storytellers by Bjørn Larssen

44153250

5 out of 5 stars

I loved this book – it was a delight to read, an unusual debut novel by a writer with much talent.

The story tells of village blacksmith Gunnar, who is (at first glance) quite happy living in his shack with his dog, Ragnar, and his ‘medicine’ (alcohol).  One night, he takes in a climber with a broken ankle, Sigurd; with reluctance, Gunnar agrees to take care of him until he can walk again.  From the outset, it is clear that there is much mystery surrounding the stranger.

Meanwhile, Gunnar’s life is picked apart by his doctor, the overbearing Brynhildur who wants to marry him, and the Conservative Women of Iceland who demand that he mend his heathen ways.  I loved these women – the Conservative Women number just two; they and Brynhildur were a joy to read.  The gossip and atmosphere of small village life reminded me of a Jane Austen novel, subtly and amusingly executed as it is.

This is actually a story within a story – the Icelandic winters are long and dark, and storytelling is a much loved pastime.  Threaded through Gunnar’s own tale is a another, told to him in instalments by Sigurd, about love, death and a feud between brothers.  Both stories are so compelling.

As we learn more about Gunnar, we discover the demons that lurk within, that he tries to banish with the moonshine that he makes in his shack.

The atmosphere of the place and time is perfectly drawn, the characterisation is excellent, the dialogue authentic and amusing.  The ending is surprising, as the link between the stories is uncovered.  In these days when so many novels are jam-packed with events from start to finish, I enjoyed the slower pace of Storytellers; it has such charm that I still found it to be a ‘page-turner’, was reluctant to leave it when I had to, and sad to finish it.

The quality of the writing and storytelling is most definitely worthy of 5*.  I was, at first, going to knock off half a star because of some editorial errors that may not concern many readers – a few Americanisms, the odd word used incorrectly, and phrases/words too modern for the time.  However, English is not the author’s first language, and his command of its subtleties is, on the whole, outstanding, so I don’t want to penalise him for that which should have been picked up by editors and proofreaders, and which I believe will be remedied soon.

This a work of literary art that I recommend most highly; Bjørn Larssen is, indeed, an Icelandic storyteller.

Book description

In March 1920 Icelandic days are short and cold, but the nights are long. For most, on those nights, funny, sad, and dramatic stories are told around the fire. But there is nothing dramatic about Gunnar, a hermit blacksmith who barely manages to make ends meet. He knows nobody will remember his existence – they already don’t. All he wants is peace, the company of his animals, and a steady supply of his medication. Sometimes he wonders what it would feel like to have a story of his own. He’s about to find out.

Sigurd – a man with a plan, a broken ankle, and shocking amounts of money – won’t talk about himself, but is happy to tell a story that just might get Gunnar killed. The blacksmith’s other “friends” are just as eager to write him into stories of their own – from Brynhildur who wants to fix Gunnar, then marry him, his doctor who is on the precipice of calling for an intervention, The Conservative Women of Iceland who want to rehabilitate Gunnar’s “heathen ways” – even that wicked elf has plans for the blacksmith.

As his defenses begin to crumble, Gunnar decides that perhaps his life is due for a change – on his own terms. But can he avoid the endings others have in mind for him, and forge his own?

The author is an ex-blacksmith, lover of all things Icelandic, physically located in Amsterdam, mentally living in a log cabin near Akureyri. He has published stories and essays in Polish and American magazines, both online and in print. This is his first novel.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

44153250

 

 

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #Memoir Pointe Patrol: How nine people saved their neighborhood by @EarikB

Today’s team review is from Olga, she blogs here https://www.authortranslatorolga.com

#RBRT Review Team

Olga has been reading Pointe Patrol by Earik Beann

42249791

This is an inspiring book and a fascinating account of what happened to a group of people who were fortunate enough (with a fair amount of human help as well) to have their houses survive a terrible fire that killed forty-four people, burned over 245000 acres and cost at least $9.5 billion in insured damages (and around $85 billion to the US economy). As the author notes, these group of people were not all house owners (he and his wife, Laura, were renting, and so were a number of the people who formed the #Pointe Patrol), but they somehow took it upon themselves to keep the neighbourhood safe.

The story reads like one of those fiction books (or movies) where a bunch of people —who have little in common and are pretty normal— discover their inner heroes and come together achieving great things. Only, this is not a fictional account. Yes, these are pretty normal people, and although some knew each other from before, the author makes the point more than once that due to his job, mostly online, he did not have much contact with the neighbours, and it is his wife who comes up with the idea of creating a chat group for the neighbours that they use to keep everybody informed of what is happening, both the people who have managed to return to the evacuated area, like they have, and also those who are outside and whose houses are still standing. As we read, we learn information about the neighbours, although not necessarily in a lot of detail (some are stubborn, some are control freaks, other have an interesting sense of humour, they are not always truthful…), and we also hear some of their opinions and prejudices (yes, we might not always agree with their politics, with their ideas on certain subjects) and, thankfully, they are not perfect. Earik and his wife are ‘the yoga people’, and other than some regular get-togethers, many of them knew each other only superficially, if at all. There is also a couple who remain in the area and never participate in any of the general efforts, and they sound quite disagreeable. So this is not an idealised version of reality, although it is an inspiring story that illustrates that people can get on when they have a sense of purpose and a mission higher than themselves, and they all work together towards a goal.

Saying that, it is difficult to read the book and not think that it would make a good TV movie. You have the retired fire-fighter, stubborn and determined, who ends up being known as Chief, you have another neighbour who works in the SQUAT team, Wayne, Eddie, who turns his garage into the neighbourhood coffee-shop and bar, two Mikes, the police and the national guard, Oscar —Earik’s Doberman, who loves his new role as proper guard dog—, their two cats, and also the people outside who keep in touch via text and provide as much support as they can with food supplies, medications, and also updates on news and life in general.

I was surprised at times at how vivid a picture the book portrays of the situation, and how, despite the fact that they are pretty much isolated and become, as the author describes it more than once, ‘a tribe’, the bigger society and its trappings interferes every so often, giving everybody reason to pause. There are the looters, always trying to get in and rob whatever they can, there are times when the reactions of the police to different individuals vary a lot depending on who they are (yes, race do matters, even in emergency situations, it seems), and although in this case the emergency seems to get the best out of this group of people, that is not the case with everybody involved.

Is there anything I didn’t enjoy? Well, the story is told from the author’s perspective, and as can happen with memoirs, it is not written as a thriller where action is everything and no extraneous information is offered. The author sometimes goes off on tangents, including information about his and his wife’s personal circumstances (they had moved very often up to that point), stories about their cats and dogs, also about how to handle a big dog, his point of view on firearms (not one I share, and the arguments he uses to try to convince his wife would definitely not convince me), a long dissertation on a particular local beer and its merits, and some pretty personal things, and although I mostly enjoyed those and they made it come more alive for me, I suspect they might be frustrating for some people, and I’ve read some reviews that mention those.

My other worry was the fact that, no matter how well they did and the amazing thing they achieved, their circumstances were very special, and it is not something that everybody should consider if faced with a similar situation. They had a retired fireman living in the neighbourhood, and they were lucky enough to have a sufficient number of neighbours taking part, with necessary materials, water, and enough outside support to manage to pull it off. (I could not help but wonder what would have happened if that was not the case and how different the results might have been in a neighbourhood without resources, financial and otherwise). Basically, keep safe and follow advice. Readers might take issue with other things: there is no gender equality at work here (Laura is the only woman there, she leaves at some point, and the rest of the women are supporting from outside, although there are policewomen and a woman member of the National Guard as well, but not members of the group), and, as I mentioned, some of the personal attitudes and comments might not be to everybody’s taste, but that is understandable when we are reading a true account, rather than a fictional one.

I enjoyed the narration, and felt as if I had shared in some of the sense of community and joint purpose of the group. I also enjoyed the off-track comments (some), learning more about how the emergency services work and are organised, and I loved Oscar and the cats as well. The fact that the profits for the sale of the book will go to support fire victims and to the families of fallen first-responders is another good reason to recommend the book. If you’re looking for an inspiring true-account of people dealing with an emergency situation, and you are fascinated by community spirit, I definitely recommend this.

Book description

On October 9, 2017, California suffered one of the most destructive fires in its history. The Tubbs Fire burned 5,643 structures and killed twenty-two people in Sonoma County. The fire department was completely overwhelmed and was so busy trying to save lives that they had to let many houses burn rather than waste resources in trying to protect them. During this chaos, nine of us snuck back into our neighborhood in the mandatory evacuation zone and formed a vigilante fire force. We called ourselves the Pointe Patrol, and saved our neighborhood, as well as an apartment complex across the street from certain destruction.

As if the fires weren’t enough, we found ourselves in the midst of anarchy, with looters running unchecked through the streets. We chased them out of houses with shovels, confronted them when they showed up in disguise, and patrolled the area with a completely over-the-top Doberman. The other neighbors who had evacuated organized themselves into our support network and supplied us with food and equipment, which they passed through to us across the police lines. My wife and I were part of that nine-person team and experienced all of this firsthand. This is the story of what happened at Viewpointe Circle during those two weeks in October.

AmazonUk | AmazonUS

42249791

Rosie’s #Bookreview Of Dual Time-Line #Histfic The Last Village by Audla English

The Last VillageThe Last Village by Audla English

3 stars

The Last Village is a dual time-line historical fiction and is written as a dedication to Marsden Village and the surrounding area.  The village was built by the Whitburn Coal Company in the 1870s and demolished ninety years later. The author also chose to use the Marsden Rock coastal setting to weave a family saga style narrative around a beautiful part of north east England.

The first story is about the life and loves of Lily, a young women growing up with her friends in 1945. The other side of the story, in 2017, is about Anna and her own discovery of her grandmother’s past life.

The author’s love of the area shines through and I liked the additional notes in the back of the book which explained the background. However, the writing style of an omniscient narrator ‘telling’ rather than ‘showing’ , i.e., giving information rather than letting the reader see it through the eyes of the characters, meant that I struggled to gain emotional empathy with them, as if I was watching the scenes through a window rather than getting to know them. I think if you know the area, then the book would have more meaning, but I need a book to grab me and make me feel really involved, caring about the people, and I didn’t get that with this story.

Overall an interesting insight into the history of the area, but it fell a little flat for me.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book description

A moving novel set in the North East of England. The Last Village is an enduring love story which spans the 1940’s and modern day, binding the generations.The majestic Souter Lighthouse stands proudly at the edge of the cliff top surrounded by open grassy empty fields and overlooking a vast blue wilderness. Anna Charles knows nothing of the life that her grandmother once had here.It wasn’t until an unexpected engagement, that Anna discovered the past of her Gran and the truth behind an enduring love.Seventy years earlier, Lillian Smith, had been part of the close-knit community that once thrived in the village that existed next to the lighthouse. A chance meeting with a sailor one day, would change the course of her life forever.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

42311093

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #RomCom Molly Hacker Is Too Picky! By @LisetteBrodey

Today’s team review is from Sandra.

#RBRT Review Team

Sandra has been reading Molly Hacker Is Too Picky by Lisette Brodey

41529153

This is not like most other romantic fiction I have read; usually, there are just two men trying to win the heart of the heroine, and it is fairly obvious which one she will end up with. The skill is in making the story interesting enough to keep us reading.

Molly Hacker Is Too Picky! breaks that mould; Molly is seeing four very different men, and is still pining for her lost love, so who will win her heart is anyone’s guess. In some ways it’s not important; her journey is fascinating and who she ends up with is not really the point. Everyone seems very keen to find Molly a partner, but, fortunately, she is not going to be rushed into an unsuitable match.

The story is told entirely through Molly’s eyes and we get a real insight into what is going through her mind. The characters are well written and believable, even her cat, Captain Jack. I really liked Molly; she’s strong and feisty and prepared to wait for her ‘soul mate’. There were lots of laugh-out-loud moments, and the scene at the society fundraiser is beyond hilarious. I’ll leave you to discover it for yourself. This is the first book I have read by Lisette Brodey, but it won’t be the last.

Book description

At thirty-two, newspaper reporter Molly Hacker vows to never attend another wedding until she has had her own. And that’s a problem because Molly’s younger sister, Hannah, is going to be married in one year. Armed with snark, wit, and fabulous good looks, “Picky Molly” embarks on a quest to find Mr. Right in her hometown, Swansea, an elegant bedroom community of NYC.

Things get complicated fast. In no time at all, Molly has four “men of interest” and the memories of a lost love to send her overanalytic, befuddled mind into serious overdrive. Determined not to let her “helpful” girlfriends help her right out of another relationship, Molly tries to keep mum on the state of her love life. Her BFF male coworker, Randy, becomes her closest confidant as he stumbles over romantic issues with his new Mr. Right, Kyle. Meanwhile, Molly’s BFF gal pals aren’t too happy about being left out of the loop.

Tweaking Molly’s last nerve is the town’s most visible socialite, Naomi Hall-Benchley. For self-serving reasons, Naomi is hell-bent on setting up “Picky Molly Hacker,” and she doesn’t care who she has to manipulate or hurt to do it. Just how far will she go?

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

41529153

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT Vintage #Mystery Passage From Nuala by @harrietsteel1

Today’s team review is from Liz, she blogs here https://lizannelloyd.wordpress.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Liz has been reading Passage From Nuala by Harriet Steel

44301993

My Review

I always look forward to a new book about the investigations of Inspector de Silva and his English wife, Jane, but this time they have left their house and garden in Ceylon to take a holiday cruise to Egypt.  Having made the same voyage through the Suez canal in reverse back in the 1960s I was intrigued to read of their experiences.

The captive population of a ship at sea is ideal for a crime mystery and there are plenty of potential candidates for the murderer in this novel.  There are arrogant wealthy women, a mismatched pair recently engaged, an unhappily married couple, a flamboyant singer and a badly scarred vicar, all hiding secrets. Jane de Silva is a more active participant in this investigation, giving us a more intimate picture of her close relationship with her husband who is in great danger during the book’s thrilling conclusion.  This 6th volume could easily be read as a standalone or an introduction to this delightful mystery series.

Book description

Inspector de Silva and Jane embark on a cruise to Egypt to visit the pyramids, excited at the prospect of two weeks of sun, sea and relaxation. With Nuala, and de Silva’s duties as a police officer, far behind them, what can possibly spoil their plans? Then a writer is found dead in his cabin, suffocated by newspaper thrust down his throat. Once again, de Silva must swing into action.
The Inspector de Silva Mysteriesis a colourful and absorbing series, spiced with humour. Set in Ceylon in the 1930s, it will appeal to fans of traditional and cozy mysteries.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

44301993