A BEND IN THE WILLOW by Susan Clayton-Goldner #WomensFiction #FamilySaga @Tirgearr @SusanCGoldner

A Bend in the WillowA Bend in the Willow by Susan Clayton-Goldner
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A Bend In The Willow is women’s fiction and is the tale of one women with two names and separate lives which ultimately mesh together.

Robin Lee Carter grew up in Willowood Kentucky. Her father was an abusive drunk who suffered post war PTSD and he was violent towards all three of his children.

By the age of seventeen, Robin’s youngest brother had tied after an unattended head injury caused by her father, her mother had died of cancer and Robin had suffered ten years of sexual abuse from her father. One evening he raped her and broke her arm in his drunkenness, then fell asleep in oil covered overalls with a lit cigarette.

Robin fled the scene of the fire which resulted, with money to start a new life and her father’s child in her belly. She tried in vain to contact her older brother for a year after the fire, then gave up.

She gave her baby away and made a new life for herself eventually marrying again and having a new child. But when her son Michael is diagnose with a rare Leukemia she must face the past to see if her family are suitable bone marrow donors.

An emotional tale for both Robin and the people whose lives she had connections with. Her adopted son, like so many children, had many questions and set backs because of his adoption and the hopes he raised of being reunited with his birth mother. Husband Ben who was devastated to find his wife had lied to him about her past. And for Robin’s brother Kyle who went into a burning house believing he needed to rescue his sister and almost losing his own life because of his heroic actions.

My favourite character was Kyle’s daughter Loralee, her angelic childhood reasoning and determination to see the good in people and to want to do her best, bound so many of the other characters together. Add this to several plot points to capture your empathy and compassion, this is a quick, enjoyable read.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book Description

Willowood, Kentucky 1965 – Robin Lee Carter sets a fire that kills her rapist, then disappears. She reinvents herself and is living a respectable life as Catherine Henry, married to a medical school dean in Tucson, Arizona. In 1985, when their 5-year-old son, Michael, is diagnosed with a chemotherapy-resistant leukemia, Catherine must return to Willowood, face her family and the 19-year-old son, a product of her rape, she gave up for adoption. She knows her return will lead to a murder charge, but Michael needs a bone marrow transplant. Will she find forgiveness, and is she willing to lose everything, including her life, to save her dying son? 

About the author

Susan Clayton-Goldner

Susan Clayton-Goldner was born in New Castle, Delaware and grew up with four brothers along the banks of the Delaware River. She is a graduate of the University of Arizona’s Creative Writing Program and has been writing most of her life. Her novels have been finalists for The Hemingway Award, the Heeken Foundation Fellowship, the Writers Foundation and the Publishing On-line Contest. Susan won the National Writers’ Association Novel Award twice for unpublished novels and her poetry was nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Her work has appeared in numerous literary journals and anthologies including Animals as Teachers and Healers, published by Ballantine Books, Our Mothers/Ourselves, by the Greenwood Publishing Group, The Hawaii Pacific Review-Best of a Decade, and New Millennium Writings. A collection of her poems, A Question of Mortality was released in 2014 by Wellstone Press. Prior to writing full time, Susan worked as the Director of Corporate Relations for University Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona. 

Susan shares a life in Grants Pass, Oregon with her husband, Andreas, her fictional characters, and more books than one person could count. 

Goodreads | AmazonUk | AmazonUS

SOUPER MUM by Kristen Bailey #Contemporary #WomensFiction @baileyforce6

Souper MumSouper Mum by Kristen Bailey
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Souper Mum is a contemporary women’s fiction novel about mother of four Jools Campbell and her showdown with celebrity TV chef Tommy McCoy.

On a disastrous Monday morning Jools is accosted in the supermarket by Tommy as he sources participants for his TV show where he shows ordinary people healthier ways to cook and eat. Jools isn’t in the mood for this and tells him straight what she thinks of him and his show. That evening she discovers she is a YouTube sensation as someone filmed her supermarket rant. The newspapers run articles on her verbal fight and the social media machine snowballs the situation.

Chaos abounds in Jools everyday life and her new life as a media star. The battle with Tommy culminates in a live TV cook-off, will Jools and her family recipes win over Tommy and his insistence that only organic foods should be fed to families?

This is a fun dialogue lead book which leaves the reader breathless at the end of its galloping pace.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book Description

A fantastic debut novel that takes a refreshing look at family, modern life, and the joyless merits of quinoa. Monday morning can’t get any worse for harassed mum-of-four Jools Campbell when, after a frantic school run, she’s cornered in the supermarket by pompous celebrity chef Tommy McCoy, who starts criticising the contents of her trolley. Apparently the fact that she doesn’t make her own bread or buy organic is tantamount to child abuse. In a hurry and short of patience, she berates McCoy for judging her when she hasn’t the time or the money to feed her family in line with his elitist ideals. Unbeknownst to Jools, her rant has been filmed and immediately goes viral on YouTube, making her a reluctant celebrity overnight. With McCoy determined to discredit her by delving into her personal life, Jools decides it’s time to fight her corner in the name of all the fraught mums out there who are fed up with being made to feel bad by food snobs like him. Armed with some fish fingers and her limited cooking repertoire, Jools must negotiate the unfamiliar world of celebrity while staying true to her instincts as a mum.

About the author

Kristen Bailey

Mother-of-four, gin-drinker, binge-watcher, receipt hoarder, hapless dog owner, enthusiastic but terrible cook. Kristen also writes. She has had short fiction published in several publications including Mslexia & Riptide. Her novels are her own take on contemporary women’s fiction and are published by the very excellent Accent Press.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS | Goodreads | Twitter also free with Kindle Unlimited

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT MANIPULATED LIVES by @HALeuschel #Shortstories #fridayreads

Today’s team review is from Liz, she blogs at https://lizannelloyd.wordpress.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Liz has been reading Manipulated Lives by H.A Leuschel

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Sometimes a book’s title and cover can deter you from opening the first page. You suspect it will be rewarding but you are worried that the experience might be distressing. But opening Manipulated Lives gives instant gratification. From the first paragraph of the first novella “The Narcissist” I was involved with the feelings of the protagonist, lying trapped in a hospital bed. It is difficult to avoid spoilers when describing this book, but what is plain is that, “Nothing is but what is not.” The author manipulates her readers.

The manipulation of another, by a character in each story, is not creative. It is abusive and is fuelled by selfishness and a need to control, but the study of how charm and deception can entrap a victim is intriguing and believable. At times, we too feel empathy for the manipulators, even though they are incapable of considering others. In the story of “Tess and Tattoos” we come to realise the complexity in the back life of a lonely old lady and in “The Spell” we begin to understand why an intelligent, talented young woman can become entangled in the lives of a busy, single father and his loveable son.
The novella, “Runaway Girl” is perhaps the most fulfilling to read. It is easy to identify with Lisa, from the point of view of her mother, her teacher or one’s own teenage years. You feel a sense of impending doom, as her life starts to fall apart and yet the story ends with such promise. The final story of “The Perfect Child” will remind any reader of mothers they have encountered or children they remember. Putting children on a pedestal has become the norm in modern society but what calamities are we laying up for ourselves by this action and who is happy? Neither parent nor child.

These novellas are beautifully written, carefully revealing characters and situations through a variety of viewpoints. H A Leuschel is a writer to watch. Her understanding of human psychology, cause and consequence, make her stories credible and fascinating.

Book Description

Five stories – Five Lives. 
Have you ever felt confused or at a loss for words in front of a spouse, colleague or parent, to the extent that you have felt inadequate or, worse, a failure? Do you ever wonder why someone close to you seems to endure humiliation without resistance? 
Manipulators are everywhere. At first these devious and calculating people can be hard to spot, because that is their way. They are often masters of disguise: witty, disarming, even charming in public – tricks to snare their prey – but then they revert to their true self of being controlling and angry in private. Their main aim: to dominate and use others to satisfy their needs, with a complete lack of compassion and empathy for their victim. 
In this collection of short novellas, you meet people like you and me, intent on living happy lives, yet each of them, in one way or another, is caught up and damaged by a manipulative individual. First you meet a manipulator himself, trying to make sense of his irreversible incarceration. Next, there is Tess, whose past is haunted by a wrong decision, then young, successful and well balanced Sophie, who is drawn into the life of a little boy and his troubled father. Next, there is teenage Holly, who is intent on making a better life for herself and finally Lisa, who has to face a parent’s biggest regret. All stories highlight to what extent abusive manipulation can distort lives and threaten our very feeling of self-worth. 

About the author

H.A. Leuschel

Helene Andrea Leuschel was born and raised in Belgium to German parents. She gained a Licentiate in Journalism, which led to a career in radio and television in Brussels, London and Edinburgh. Helene moved to the Algarve in 2009 with her husband and two children, working as a freelance TV producer and teaching yoga. She recently acquired a Master of Philosophy with the OU, deepening her passion for the study of the mind. Manipulated Lives is Helene’s first work of fiction.

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT NEVER COMING BACK by @DLPalmer_Writer #WomensFiction

Today’s team review is from Alison, she blogs at http://alisonwilliamswriting.wordpress.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Alison has been reading Never Coming Back by Deirdre Palmer

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‘Never Coming Back’ by @DLPalmer_Writer

Your best friend dies. All because of you. How do you go on? Layla is struggling to come to terms with the death of her best friend, Danni, at a student party almost a year ago. Perhaps she never will – because only Layla knows the truth about what happened that night. Danni’s parents, Melody and Reece, invite Layla for weekend visits to their Sussex farmhouse home, and she’s happy to accept – until Melody’s increasing dependence on her sends out warning signals. Although she knows it’s time to break away, for all their sakes, Layla’s guilt over Danni’s death has her returning, time and again. When Layla meets Morgan, the connection between them is unmistakable. But until she confronts the past, she can’t face the future, let alone allow herself to fall in love. There is only one way out: Layla must confess her secret to Danni’s parents. But can she risk breaking their hearts all over again? And will Morgan still love her, once he discovers the kind of person she really is? It’s the hardest decision. And time is running out…

The topic of guilt and grief and how different people deal with loss and tragedy is at the heart of this extremely thoughtful and well-written novel. The characters are beautifully drawn and three-dimensional. Layla, in particular, is compelling; her mixed emotions, her grief, her guilt, vividly and realistically portrayed.

Her relationship with Melody and Reece is heart-breaking to read. I was so sorry for Melody, and at the same time frustrated because I so wanted her to move on, to find peace – to write a character that pulls on the emotions like that is a real skill.

Layla’s relationship with Morgan avoids the stereotypical romance that would have, for me, ruined the story. Layla is pulled, by the past and by her potential future too, but the connection between her and Morgan isn’t used as a cure all or a neat conclusion. This was really refreshing.

This is a slow-paced book, but that suits the mood and the subject matter perfectly. My only criticism would be that on occasion things are a little too drawn out. I would also like to have known more about Kate, Morgan’s girlfriend, and why she behaved as she did. The multiple viewpoints work well on the whole, and we do have some of the narrative from Kate’s point of view. Because of this, I did want her to be more complete as a character.

That said, I thoroughly enjoyed this lovely book and would certainly look out for more by the author.

Four out of five stars

About the author

Deirdre Palmer

Deirdre lives in Brighton, the city by the sea. Most of her working life has been spent in administration, mainly in the public sector, most recently at the University of Brighton.
When she began writing fiction seriously, she joined the Romantic Novelists’ Association’s New Writers’ Scheme, and is now a full member of the Association.
In recent years she has twice been a major prize-winner in the Mail on Sunday Novel Competition.
Deirdre belongs to a thriving, ten-strong blog group called ‘The Write Romantics’.

AmazonUk | AmazonUS | Goodreads | Twitter

 

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT MIAMI MORNING by Mary Clark @mceyes #WomensFiction

Today’s team review is from E.L Lindley, she blogs at http://lindleyreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

#RBRT Review Team

E.L. has been reading Miami Morning by Mary Clark

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Miami Morning by Mary Clark is the story of idealistic teacher Leila Payson. It’s a novel that affords the reader not only the opportunity to follow Leila on her journey through life but also offers a glimpse of what life is like working within the public schools’ system in Miami amid ever changing educational ideology and internal politics.

The novel begins on Leila’s 41st birthday, she is enjoying a comfortable existence having been a social studies’ teacher for fifteen years. However, her sense of peace is undermined as she begins to reflect back over her past. Clark uses Leila’s memories to draw the reader into her life as we are given an insight into key life changing events, such as the death of her mother.

A defining experience in Leila’s life is the two years she spends in South Africa. It’s an experience that fundamentally changes her perspective as she works alongside an occupational therapist who believes in total social inclusion for people with disabilities. Her conviction for equal opportunities later causes her to become a champion for a young boy who is losing his hearing which in turn leads to resentment amongst other health professionals.

Although the novel is very much Leila’s story, there are other significant characters. She has an unsuccessful romance with a womanising journalist and long term friendships with Dov and Maria who are both committed to charitable endeavours and, like Leila spend most of their time looking out for others.

There are many things to like about this book, in particular Clark’s ability to convey the setting. She describes Miami in a vivid and colourful way, focusing on the natural habitat. As the story moves to South Africa Clark’s skill is in evidence again as she transports the reader to the changing landscape. Leila also enjoys a holiday to Spain which is equally brought alive by Clark’s writing. The reader is left with the impression that these are places that Clark knows extremely well.

Despite it being Leila’s story it very much feels like Clark uses her novel to convey her own views on society and education. She promotes a holistic style of education which is about more than academic needs and looks after students emotional and mental well being as well. We also get to understand the kind of red tape that constrains teachers when Leila faces a dilemma of whether to intervene in a potentially dangerous fight as it’s against school policy to do so. Clark also expounds the benefits of diversity in schools as a way of enriching all students’ lives.

The novel raises many philosophical issues through Leila’s experiences. She constantly ponders what it is that makes us human and struggles with the need to retain independence and a sense of identity whilst wanting to immerse herself into the community. Whilst in Africa she questions the validity of providing aid and fears that it may diminish people’s sense of power and control. In particular it raises questions about disability and whether disabled people’s quality of life and independence is hampered by misguided attempts to help them.

The novel has an effective shape to it in the way that Clark takes us from the present to different past experiences in Leila’s life. It allows her life to become fuller and fuller and so by the end we are delighted when she meets Mark Carollten, an occupational therapist who shares many of her life views and interests. We are left with the hope that the two of them will make it work at a time when Leila is looking for a relationship to complete her sense of purpose.

The only issue for me with this novel is that Clark has chosen to tell it in the 3rd person narrative. For me it would have lent itself beautifully to 1st person given that it is exclusively Leila’s story and she is a very introspective character. I think it would have helped the reader to get to know Leila on a deeper level as it would have removed the distance that 3rd person inevitably creates.

I also think that 1st person narrative would have allowed Clark to promote her own views in a more subtle way. My worry is that if readers aren’t that interested in education or looking for a light read they may find Clark’s voice intrusive.

Having said that this is only my opinion and I really enjoyed Miami Morning. I think if you like character driven novels that are more thoughtful than action packed then you should give this one a try.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

The Strangely Surreal Adventures of Sylvia Smetana by Meira Eliot @meiraeliot #RBRT #womensfiction

Today’s second team review is from Noelle, she blogs at http://saylingaway.wordpress.com

#RBRT Review Team

Noelle has been reading The Strangely Surreal Adventures of Sylvia Smetana by Meira Eliot

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I will freely confess it took me a while to finish this book. Life got in the way and I had to go back and reread a goodly portion of it, because the story jumps around.

It begins in medieval Prague, now the capitol of the Czech Republic, and a city I know well having lived there for more than a year. The author asks, “What is life?” and then describes a barber, bored with his profession, who leaves his wife and children to follow the perceived enchanted life of a traveling scholar and alchemist. He carries with him a green stone of moldovite, the only gem not of this earth, but from a meteorite. When he returns to Prague after many fruitless years, he finds his wife dead and his daughters working in a brothel and realizes he had squandered a good life.

This is the prospect facing the main character in this book, Sylvia Smetana, a likeable middle-aged teacher at Our Lady of Ransom’s private school for girls, where she teaches religious studies. She was more or less contented with her life until she traveled to Prague with her mother Svetlana, a Czech ex-pat who has lived in England since the 1950s. Svetlana gives her daughter a ring of moldovite, and from that time, Sylvia feels a psychic draw to Prague, to which she escapes as often as possible, and she begins to observe and question the lives of ambition populating the school.

The book is part scathingly funny description of the school’s hierarchy and the lengths to which the members of the administration will go to advance. The author has clearly had experience with the machinations of academia, and her sarcastic views tickled my funny bone, since I’m a long time academic.  She takes the concepts of head hunting, steering committees and thinking outside the box to new heights of ridiculousness, and I loved these parts of the book.

I also enjoyed the author’s colorful descriptions of Prague and the many sites I know so well. It was a trip down memory lane for me and her affection for the city comes through loud and clear. I, too, would love to return again and again.

One problem I had with the book was the changing points of view. The story jumped from Sylvia to her mother to the parent of a prospective student and to another faculty member who is having a nervous breakdown and back again. I found the transitions jarring and occasionally perplexing. There are also digressions to the history of John Dee, English mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, occult philosopher, and advisor to Queen Elizabeth I, and his links to Prague, specifically to Thaddeus Hajek. Hajek was the personal physician of the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolph II and a Bohemian astronomer. I see these digressions as part of the Sylva’s growing desire to nurture her inner life, and the book concludes with wandering thoughts on love and trust, the finding of self, and the creation of our lives through experience.

I give this book four stars, largely based on its characters and humor, which makes it well worth reading.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

LIZZIE’S SECRET by Rosie Clarke #WW2 #WomensFiction #Bookreview #amreading @HoZ_Books

Lizzie's Secret (The Workshop Girls)Lizzie’s Secret by Rosie Clarke
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

My Rating 3.5 stars

Lizzie’s Secret is historical fiction set in 1939 London. It opens with a dream scene prologue, Lizzie being chased and then her waking in a hospital with no memory of her name or how she got there. We learn that Lizzie was the victim of a brutal attack when she was just fourteen.

Now twenty, Lizzie lives with her Uncle and Aunt, we meet her at a job interview for a milliner. A job Lizzie quickly excels at, she befriends Beth and the girls enjoy double dating when they go out. Soon Lizzie is making special bespoke hats for clients brought in by Sebastian Winters, a man with his own hat shop.

As Britain falls further into the grip of war the lives of Lizzie and Beth are affected as their menfolk leave for war and they are left behind to wait and deal with the consequences of life.

The war years are popular storylines and this one with a milliner theme makes it interesting. However the book wavered on using dialogue for info dumping and there wasn’t much difference in the “character voices”. The copy I received for review contained several errors in content and editing which I would like to see ironed out, then this book would be a good example of its genre.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

I was provided with a free copy of this book for review from Aria a digital imprint from Head Of Zeus

View all my reviews on Goodreads

DUBLIN’S FAIR CITY by @cathymansell3 #WomensFiction #BookReview

Dublin's Fair CityDublin’s Fair City by Cathy Mansell
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Dublin’s Fair City is Women’s Fiction set in the mid 1960’s in Dublin and Birmingham. This is a light easy read, a mix of family saga and light romance. Eighteen year old Aileen Maguire lives with her parents, they run a haberdashery shop. Eileen’s mother is ill and on her deathbed writes a small note asking Aileen to find her long lost brother and ask his forgiveness.

Aileen’s father is shocked by his wife’s death and secret revelation, he falls into despair and whilst grieving allows Aileen’s Aunt Lizzie to take over and Aileen finds herself cold shouldered out of the family home. She goes to Birmingham to stay with a distant relative and wishes to discover more about her mother and her past. However the answers are not in England.

Events in England test her relationship with boyfriend Dermot who is back in Ireland, they take their relationship to breaking point when Aileen finally returns home for good. Can she find the answers about her long lost brother? Will she make things right with Dermot?

The storyline is very much dialogue led which slows the pace and for me, misses opportunities for leading the read with descriptive sentences filled with emotion and passion. There is room to add depth to the writing by taking more time with the main points and considering if all the lesser story threads add to the main theme. To remain competitive in the saturated women’s fiction genre I’d like to see a slimming of weak words and sentences and a touch up of the dialogue to make it vivid, sharp and pace setting.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

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Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT DUST by @BeauxCooper #WomensFiction

Today’s team review comes from Alison, she blogs at http://alisonwilliamswriting.wordpress.com/

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Alison has been reading Dust by Beaux Cooper

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This is a really tricky review to write, because this novel has real potential to be a beautiful, engaging and enjoyable read, and the writer also has the ability and talent to write well. However, the novel has been completely let down by the editing.


The novel tells the story of Austen, a woman dissatisfied by life, by her husband in particular, who needs to find out what she wants from life. She makes the brave decision to go and work on a ranch in Wyoming. This is a really interesting idea – there is potential for drama, humour, and an investigation into relationships, character and what makes people tick. I’m convinced the author is capable of this, as her characters are warm and could be developed into something really special. She obviously knows the places she is writing about and has a real love for those places and people, and this could all be made into a wonderful book.


However, the novel needs a good editor to take it in hand and help the author realise its full potential. I’m not talking about typos or issues with grammar or spelling here, but fundamental issues with the structure, style and content of the novel. Dialogue, for instance, is extremely unnatural. The characters have long, in depth conversations with each other about their innermost feelings that are unnatural and unrealistic. Characters in novels need to sound like real people. And while we have this insight into the characters feelings, we know nothing really about Austen herself – what she does before she gives it all up to go to the ranch, what her background is etc., all those things that make fully formed characters.


The language too needs a thorough edit. The text is full of complicated words and convoluted, complicated sentences that need to be tightened, strengthened and restructured. There also needs to be a much clearer point of view. These are all issues that a good editor could sort, working with the writer to draw out the fabulous story and the great writing that is in there somewhere.


I’m giving this book three stars because I really feel that this author has the potential to write and write well, and the idea for this novel is sound. However, Ms Cooper has been totally let down by poor editing, which is a real shame.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

BETWEEN FRIENDS by Jenny Harper #WomensFiction @BrookCottageBks @harper_jenny #TuesdayBookBlog

Between FriendsBetween Friends by Jenny Harper
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Between Friends is a contemporary Women’s fiction read set in Edinburgh. Three friends; Marta, Jane and Carrie have been friends for a long time. When an old flame comes to Edinburgh for the arts festival their friendship is tested to the limits.

Jane is married to Jake, he’s currently unemployed, she’d like a baby. Carrie is a career women and likes to be in control of her relationships. Jane is married to Neal and has three children and a busy chaotic life, yet all this is turned upside down when Marta invites Tom to a surprise dinner and offers him a place to stay.

Tom is Jane’s ex and he’s Carrie’s ex and he’s about to cause a rift for Marta too. Old wounds are opened, new wounds are made and Tom believes he can carry on as he pleases while others suffer.
I enjoyed how each women worked through her insecurities and found the strength to pull together in the end.

This is a book about the strength of relationships, with a feel good ending.

View all my reviews on Goodreads.

Between Friends Tour Banner 1 1

Genre: Contemporary Women’s Fiction

Release Date: 11 February 2016

Publisher: Accent Press

They thought he belonged safely in the past. His return threatens everything.

Marta, Carrie and Jane have been friends since they were at school in Edinburgh. Now one is bringing up her family, another is desperately trying for children of her own, and the third is focused on her career – and each takes the support of the others as a given.

But when generous Marta offers out-of-luck actor Tom temporary shelter, her act of kindness sets in motion a tsunami of destruction. Marta’s marriage comes under threat. Timid Jane is haunted by the secret she has been hiding since she last saw Tom. And ambitious Carrie finds herself at the mercy of a man who can ruin her career.

Only by pulling together can the friends rid themselves of this menace. But is Tom too clever at sowing mistrust?

 

BUY LINKS

AMAZON UK

AMAZON US

 

ABOUT JENNY HARPER

Jenny CC 6

Jenny Harper lives in Edinburgh, Scotland, though she was born in India and grew up in England. She has been a non-fiction editor, a journalist and a businesswoman and has written a children’s novel and several books about Scotland, as well as four full length novels and a novella in The Heartlands series (set in Hailesbank), and two short stories that have appeared in anthologies. Between Friends is her fifth full length novel.

Jenny writes contemporary women’s fiction with bite – complex characters facing serious issues.

What they say:

‘An engaging and delightful read. Jenny Harper is a most gifted storyteller.’ Alexander McCall Smith

‘Page turning and thoroughly entertaining. I loved it!’ Katie Fforde

‘The most beautiful love story that I have read in a long while. Amazon review of People We Love

‘This was a fun, heart-warming but also emotional story that had me thinking about the characters long after I’d finished it.’ Amazon review of Maximum Exposure

‘Ms. Harper has created a fully populated, very human and recognizable world.’ Amazon review of Face the Wind and Fly

‘There is everything I like about a novel in her writing: family, relationships, current affairs … things the author seems well versed in. I loved the Scottish settings, and could visualise many of the locations in the book …’ Amazon review of Loving Susie

Webpage            http://jennyharperauthor.co.uk/

Twitter                https://twitter.com/harper_jenny

Facebook            https://www.facebook.com/authorjennyharper

Google +             https://plus.google.com/+JennyHarperauthor/posts

Goodreads         https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/15692421-jenny-harper

Riffle                     https://read.rifflebooks.com/profiles/151045

Amazon Author Page http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B00HXIE2Q0

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