📚Final Story Of This #Fantasy Adventure Series. Rosie’s #Bookreview of Zanshin by @WriterRSJ #Myths #SpiritualAnimals

ZanshinZanshin by Rennie St. James
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Zanshin is book six and the final story of the fantasy adventure tales in the Rahki Chronicles.

These stories feature a band of people who have links to tribal and spiritual animal elements, in various settings in modern-day America.

Mia is the leader of her tribe that investigates the death of an old friend, which leads them to the myth of a Ghost Cat. A revolution in their society is threatening all the tribes, but Mia and her team guard against attacks while following clues. Magic and fantasy are mixed with tribal stories and traditions. They travel to Utah and then to Mexico following the legends surrounding the Ghost Cat.

I began my journey with this series almost four years ago; the stories have been thoughtful and are different from many others which involve Native American themes. There is a martial arts sub-theme as well as animals and their spirits which different members associate with.

This is a steady series which is best read from book one, so that the reader can understand the world and how the story develops. However, if you have an interest in myths and animal spirits then do give it a try.

Read my review of book #1 of the series here.

View all my reviews  on Goodreads

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Book description

Life hasn’t been all chocolate and rainbows since Mia Rayner reclaimed her warrior heritage.

Her clan did survive the latest battle, but a revolution now looms on the horizon. A friend’s murder will reveal an old enemy hiding in the darkness and even Nadya’s faith will be shaken by ghosts of the past.

Mia must find the strength to stand alone even if it means breaking the bonds of family.

Can any hope remain for the Kiaranast Tribe after love is sacrificed and blood is spilled?

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🧛🏻‍♀️A werewolf is on the loose in London. @OlgaNM7 Reviews #UrbanFantasy Eat The Poor by @TomCW99 for Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT

Today’s team review is from Olga.

Olga blogs here https://www.authortranslatorolga.com

Orange rose and Rosie's Book Review Team
Rosie’s Book Review Team

Olga has been reading Eat The Poor by Tom Williams.

Eat The Poor by Tom Williams set against a photo of a gargoyle eating it's foot from a free phot from Pixabay
Eat The Poor by Tom Williams

The description of the novel sets up the plot quite clearly, and I won’t elaborate on it. Readers can find elements of the police procedural novel (one flexible enough to allow for a supernatural element rather than one where logic and realism to the minutest detail are the required standard) with an unlikely and seemingly unsuited couple of investigators, and the tongue-in-cheek approach suits beautifully the description of the inner workings of the police department, and the way promotions and a career in the police are likely to progress for those who care for the actual job and are not that keen on cultivating influences and playing political games within the force.

The ironic commentary on UK politics helps make the story even more memorable. After recent shenanigans in the UK Parliament, one can’t help but wonder if a conservative MP with pretty radical (and classist) views, with the peculiarity of being also a werewolf, would really be that much worse than what had been happening. (And, of course, readers in other countries would wonder the same as well, as although the details might be different, the behaviour of the political classes has been less than stellar pretty much around the world).

There is a mystery that owes plenty to the cozy genre (despite some vicious murders and the addition of the supernatural Others that usually belong in the horror genre) and is likely to attract people who are more interested in quirky and original characters than in the investigation itself.

I haven’t read the first novel in the series, so I don’t know anything about the background story between Pole and Galbraith, and I can confirm that this book can be read as a stand-alone. There are some references to the previous case, but those are contextualised and don’t affect the action or the development of the story. Of course, having read this book, I’d like to know more about the first case, but that is to be expected, having enjoyed this one so much.

The story is narrated in the third person from two of the characters’ points of view (mostly, although there are some paragraphs and comments from an outside observer’s perspective), those of Galbraith and of the criminal they are trying to track. That gives readers a better understanding of the personality of the perpetrator and the circumstances behind the crimes, some of which are well beyond anybody’s control. That doesn’t make the criminal more likeable, at least to me (his politics are quite extreme, although looking at the general political situation, it is evident that many people share similar views), but it allows us to follow his reasoning and to see how easy it could be for someone to move from similar type of thoughts to action. Despite the light tone of the story and the amusing characters and events, there is more than a slight touch of social criticism and a call to attention that is impossible to miss. From feeling privileged and proud of one’s achievement to thinking that those who aren’t as well-off as one is are undeserving of any help or assistance there is but a small step.

Chief Inspector Galbraith is a sympathetic character, and especially those readers of a certain age who have seen their jobs change and become enmeshed in bureaucracy and a never-ending litany of meetings and committees are likely to identify with him. (I had to nod at many of the situations, and some of his reflections as well).

Pole is a mysterious character who never quite reveals much about anything, especially himself —he mentions Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes, and it is impossible to read about his character and not think of Doyle’s creation—, but there are moments when his real feelings and emotions filter through the hundreds of years of containment and good breed. I came to like him more and more as the story progressed, and I hope there will be plenty of occasions to get to know him better in future books.

I’ve talked about the baddie already, but towards the end of the novel, a new character was introduced and became one of my favourites. Robson is a masterpiece, and he makes the closing of the investigation totally memorable. (And no, I won’t say anything else about him).

Those readers who dislike head hopping and sudden changes in viewpoint don’t need to worry, as each chapter is told from a single point of view, and it is clearly marked. Oh, and I love the old-style titles of the chapters. They are a joy.

You’ve probably guessed that I enjoyed the ending from my mention of Robson, but apart from the resolution of the case, there are a couple of scenes at the end that I also enjoyed. Especially because Pole and Galbraith share a moment that reminded me of Casablanca’s closing scene when Humphrey Bogart and Claude Rains disappear into the fog. Very understated and very moving.

So, if you enjoy mysteries but are not a stickler for realism, love quirky characters and appreciate a touch of the paranormal, have a sense of humour, and like to look at politics and society from a critical but seemingly light-hearted point of view, you should give this novel a go. The author has written plenty of historical novels and has a talent for highlighting trends, connections, and behaviours that many might not perceive. I have discovered another author whose books I’m eager to learn more about, and I’m sure I won’t be alone in this.

Orange rose book description
Book description

A werewolf is on the loose in London.

Chief Inspector Pole, the vampire from the mysterious Section S, teams up once again with his human counterpart to hunt down the beast before the people of the city realise that they are threatened by creatures they have dismissed as myths.

Time is short as the werewolf kills ever more recklessly. Can Galbraith and Pole stop it before panic spreads through London?

Galbraith and Pole start their search in Pole’s extensive library of the arcane, accompanied by a couple of glasses of his excellent malt whisky. All too soon, though, they will have to take to the streets to hunt the monster by the light of the moon.

But the threat is even greater than they think, for in its human form the werewolf is terrifyingly close to the heart of government.

This is Tom Williams’ second tongue-in-cheek take on traditional creatures of darkness. Like the first Galbraith & Pole book, Something Wicked, this will appeal to fans of Ben Aaronovitch’s Rivers of London.

You never know when the forces of darkness may be released and there will be no time for reading then. Buy Eat the Poor before it’s too late.

AmazonUk | AmazonUS

🧛🏻‍♀️The Vampires Of Oxford #UrbanFantasy Series Book #2 Wicked Blood by @MargotDKwrites #TuesdayBookBlog

Book cover for Wicked Blood by Margot de Klerk, set againsta a background of a Berlin bridge from a free photo from Pixabay.

Wicked Blood by Margot de Klerk.

Wicked Blood by Margot de Klerk

4 stars

Wicked Blood is book #2 of The Vampires Of Oxford urban fantasy series. This second story is set in Berlin and features shapeshifter Cynthia. She has finished school and gone travelling to Berlin where she hopes to meet up with her elusive father. She is surprised to discover that the paranormal community in Berlin is unusually quiet; so quiet that her friend and paranormal hunter, Nathan asks her to see if she can find out why.

Once she starts investigating, Cynthia hears of missing shapeshifters, sick vampires and feuding witches—in fact her nosiness stirs up far too much trouble, and soon Cynthia is in danger.

Once again the author has done a good job with this paranormal world. Some of the teenage angst and attitude got a little waring towards the end and a couple of times the ‘venturing into danger while disobeying good advice’ scenario veered towards the cliché as opposed to the trope. However, the plot was well thought out and it left plenty of room for more adventures in this series.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

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Book description

Cynthia has never met her father. She only knows one thing about him: he’s a dangerous mage with a track record of killing shapeshifters like her.

Finished with school and struggling to figure out what to do next, Cynthia boards a plane to Berlin following a mysterious postcard from her father. She hopes to find him and finally solve the mystery of her origins. But then Nathan, her vampire hunter ex-boyfriend, asks for a favour. Look up the hunters in Berlin and find out why there’s been radio silence from the supernatural community of Berlin for the last eight months.

What should have been a simple request leads to unimaginable danger.

The more Cynthia digs into the whereabouts of Berlin’s supernatural community, the more she uncovers secrets that threaten her life. Something is going down in Berlin, but who is behind it? She finds herself torn in two directions: should she be loyal to her people, the shapeshifters? Or should she follow her heart? Which choice will keep her safe, when everyone seems to be out for her blood?

It’s a dangerous time to be in Berlin… and the answers to Cynthia’s questions might just strike closer to home than she realises.

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🕵🏻‍♂️’A supernatural police procedural that laughs with sharp teeth.’ Jenni reviews #urbanfantasy Eat The Poor by @TomCW99, for Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT

Today’s team review is from Jenni.

Find out more about Jenni here https://jenniferdebie.com/

Orange rose and Rosie's Book Review Team
Rosie’s Book Review Team

Jenni has been reading Eat The Poor by Tom Williams

Eat The Poor by Tom Williams set against a photo of a gargoyle eating it's foot from a free phot from Pixabay
Eat The Poor by Tom Williams

Returning to the scene of the crime, and the chief inspectors who will solve it, Tom Williams is having obvious, and bloody, fun in his second entry into the Galbraith & Pole series with Eat the Poor. Odd couple Chief Inspector Galbraith, an only slightly middle-aged mortal, and his counterpart Chief Inspector Pole, a vampire with a few centuries under his belt, are on the trail of something rotten, something hungry, and something neither of them have ever seen before in this novel and I’ve got to say, it works!

There is obvious chemistry and history to these two characters, but Williams has a light touch when it comes to referencing the first novel in this series (Something Wicked, 2021), and readers will not feel lost if this is their first experience with Galbraith and Pole. Exposition is delivered naturalistically, no pages or paragraphs devoted to catching new readers up to speed, because honestly, what do they need to catch up on? Other than the odd line about tango lessons and the inevitable question that every author must confront when they pair up an immortal vampire and a very mortal human, there seems to be little plot carried over from the first novel. Something has started eating people on the streets of London, and the facts of the current case are far more pressing than hashing out the details of the last one.

And the man who is doing all this eating? Well he’s a fun character in and of himself, and a sly satire on the state of affairs in general that I will leave it to the readers to discover for themselves. Needless to say, there are two sides of this story: the hunters and the hunted, and Williams’ tongue was lodged firmly in his cheek when he drew this particular antagonist.

Fun and fast to read, with just the right amount of black in its comedy, Eat the Poor is a supernatural police procedural that laughs with sharp teeth. Williams evidently enjoyed creating these characters, readers will certainly enjoy getting to know them!

5/5

Orange rose book description
Book description

A werewolf is on the loose in London.

Chief Inspector Pole, the vampire from the mysterious Section S, teams up once again with his human counterpart to hunt down the beast before the people of the city realise that they are threatened by creatures they have dismissed as myths.

Time is short as the werewolf kills ever more recklessly. Can Galbraith and Pole stop it before panic spreads through London?

Galbraith and Pole start their search in Pole’s extensive library of the arcane, accompanied by a couple of glasses of his excellent malt whisky. All too soon, though, they will have to take to the streets to hunt the monster by the light of the moon.

But the threat is even greater than they think, for in its human form the werewolf is terrifyingly close to the heart of government.

This is Tom Williams’ second tongue-in-cheek take on traditional creatures of darkness. Like the first Galbraith & Pole book, Something Wicked, this will appeal to fans of Ben Aaronovitch’s Rivers of London.

You never know when the forces of darkness may be released and there will be no time for reading then. Buy Eat the Poor before it’s too late.

AmazonUk | AmazonUS

🌳’Monsters in the wood nip at the edges of her thoughts.’🌳Rosie’s #Bookreview of #urbanfantasy The Forest Of Forgotten Vows by Grace Carlisle.

Book cover for urban fantasy The Forest Of Forgotten Vows by Grace Carlisle, set against a woodland scene with orange toadstools from a free photo from Pixabay

The Forest Of Forgotten Vows by Grace Carlisle

Forest of Forgotten Vows by Grace Carlisle

3.5 stars

Forest of Forgotten Vows is an urban fantasy tale. It has an American setting in a deep woodland. Tamsin, a young adult, has returned to her grandmother’s home to help care for her. She left when she was a teenager but now memories of monsters in the wood nip at the edges of her thoughts.

Tamsin is about to dismiss any thought of monsters as silly and childish when a tiny man, a brownie, sprints out from under the doorsteps. Then there’s the cat who doesn’t speak, but wants Tamsin to follow it into the woods. Grandma doesn’t want Tamsin to wander about; her ventures have ended badly in the past. Perhaps Zach, Tamsin’s childhood friend, can help her remember what happened when they were children.

This story ventures into the world of Faerie and a mystery surrounding a prison. Tamsin has been on a quest since her childhood, but she cannot remember the details. Now as an adult she must once more tread through the complexities of Faerie and those who live there, to try and fulfil her quest and the vows she has made.

I liked the little brownie called Creeps and the characters from Faerie. However, the twists of the tale weren’t always easy to follow and I wasn’t a fan of the extended time spent in visions and dreams, which took me away from the story.  Just a suggestion here and there would have worked better for me with more interaction in real time to keep this firmly in the urban fantasy genre.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Orange rose book description

Book description

After returning to her isolated childhood home to care for her aging grandmother, Tamsin thinks the make-believe games and imaginary friends of her youth are far behind her. But she soon discovers the past has been waiting, and that the dangerous and enigmatic world of Faerie is bleeding into her world, forcing Tamsin to contend with forgotten friends, foes, and creatures pulled from deepest nightmares in order to reclaim what she didn’t know she’d lost.

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🕵️‍♂️’The seamier side of London is brought to the fore here’🕵️‍♂️@SueBavey reviews supernatural #mystery Eat The Poor by @TomCW99

Today’s team review is from Sue.

Sue blogs here https://suelbavey.wordpress.com/

Orange rose and Rosie's Book Review Team
Rosie’s Book Review team

Sue has been reading Eat The Poor by Tom Williams

Book cover for supernatural mystery, Eat The Poor by Tom Williams, set against a picture of a gargoyle, from a free photo from Pixabay.
Eat The Poor by Tom Williams

Eat the Poor is the second supernatural detective fantasy featuring the unlikely pairing of Chief Inspector John Galbraith and the vampire, Chief Inspector Pole, following on from Something Wicked which I read and reviewed last year. This time Pole and his mysterious police department “Section S” are on the trail of a creature that has been attacking deer in Richmond Park, dogs and more recently a human. Could the offender be a werewolf?

Once again I enjoyed the unlikely camaraderie of the two main protagonists, thrown together by the unusual nature of the local murder case. They are very different characters, Pole a 500 year old strait-laced vampire with refined tastes and Galbraith a down to Earth middle-aged detective whose waistline is spreading and hair is greying, beginning to consider his next steps within the police force. Seconded to Section S for the duration of this peculiar murder case, he soon finds himself dining with Pole at his abode most nights as they go over the particulars of the case and the body count begins to rise.

In addition to this fantasy series, the author is a writer of historical fiction and he often includes historical details in the story which make it richer and lend authenticity to the world in which the story is set. The seamier side of London is to the fore here, with murder victims coming from the ranks of the serial unemployed, their bodies being unceremoniously dumped in the garbage areas of the tower blocks of the seedier neighbourhoods in which they live.

We are told fairly early on who the perpetrator of the crimes is and are then able to watch the detectives follow clues until they figure it out for themselves and the pace speeds up until the final “edge of the seat” confrontation. What happens after this confrontation, I found to be quite surprising – it was not what I expected in terms of a conclusion to the case at all. This light-hearted police procedural and its surprising ending was a breath of fresh air and since it is a novella and therefore fairly short, it was quick to get into the action of the story and to grip my attention. I particularly liked how odious the Conservative MP Christopher Garold was. Anyone following British politics lately will not find the idea of a murderous werewolf that far-fetched when it comes to the dirty little secrets of those in power:

“…though the staff were good at turning a blind eye to peculiar behaviour from MPs, the sight of a wolf strolling through the corridors of power would, he thought, be too much for them to ignore.”

Anyone who likes a detective story with a little supernatural edge should give this book a try!

Book #1 Something Wicked was previously reviewed on Goodreads by Sue.

Orange rose book description
Book description

A werewolf is on the loose in London.

Chief Inspector Pole, the vampire from the mysterious Section S, teams up once again with his human counterpart to hunt down the beast before the people of the city realise that they are threatened by creatures they have dismissed as myths.

Time is short as the werewolf kills ever more recklessly. Can Galbraith and Pole stop it before panic spreads through London?

Galbraith and Pole start their search in Pole’s extensive library of the arcane, accompanied by a couple of glasses of his excellent malt whisky. All too soon, though, they will have to take to the streets to hunt the monster by the light of the moon.

But the threat is even greater than they think, for in its human form the werewolf is terrifyingly close to the heart of government.

This is Tom Williams’ second tongue-in-cheek take on traditional creatures of darkness. Like the first Galbraith & Pole book, Something Wicked, this will appeal to fans of Ben Aaronovitch’s Rivers of London.

You never know when the forces of darkness may be released and there will be no time for reading then. Buy Eat the Poor before it’s too late.

AmazonUk | AmazonUS

Rosie’s #Bookreview of #urbanfantasy THE DANCING CROW (Kingdoms of Blood, #1) by Des. M. Astor

The Dancing Crow: Version 2 of Book 1 (The Kingdoms of Blood) by [Des M. Astor, Michael  Allenson]The Dancing Crow by Des M. Astor

3 stars

The Dancing Crow is an urban fantasy tale about Ares, a vampire prince who goes into hiding from his own kingdom. He creates a gang of followers and together they try to protect innocent humans and stop them being taken as blood slaves by other ruthless vampire royalty.

This is an action packed story with lots of blood and gore from multiple battles. The author has created a world filled with mythical creatures and most of the action takes place in and around an unnamed city. There is a large cast of characters, many living in their own gangs and at times, it was hard to remember who they all were. Although the main plot of this story ends in this book, there is also an opening left for the continuation of the series.

I liked the mythical creatures and Ares was likeable for his principles and his sense of humour. However, I thought that his character needed deeper development to back up the purpose of the whole story arc. There was also room to make some of the other main characters more rounded and unique; at the moment too many of them act and sound too similar which makes them harder to picture.

Overall, I liked the story idea, but it still needs a bit more attention to the plot and the characters, then a good polish and tidy up; there were too many editing and proofreading errors for me to ignore.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Desc 1

Life as we know it is coming to a close. Vampires emerge from the shadows to rip dominant species on Earth from our grasp. There is no hope.

Or… is there? An unusual hero rises up from the depths of the city streets to fight for mankind. He’s a powerful vampire gang leader named Ares, and while he has plenty of flaws, he tries to stay true to his morals as much as possible. Blood runs like a river down the streets as the vampire war erupts all over the world, and magic starts to kindle from the slumber humanity locked it in.

Can Ares and his gang manage to pull through for at least his city and the innocent humans that reside there? Or will they fall like the rest? Time is ticking as the vampire tyrant known as Ash Elapid claws his way up through the ranks and tries to take the city, and nearby kingdom, for his own. Eventually this leads Ares to unusual allies, like a half-dragon and tasmanian devil shapeshifter.

Of course, saving his city isn’t the only thing on his mind. A vampire hunter known as Cecelia, indoctrinated heavily due to a religious cult, is trying to off him. While she’s a miserable failure, could she prove to eventually rise up and slay him?

Many humans are blind as to how vampires truly work, on top of all this. Not only are they very much alive, a sister humanoid species to them, but methods such as sunlight (which vampires are sensitive to since they’re nocturnal), holy water, crosses, and the light do not work to kill them. Some got it right with silver, at least, which is a deadly poison to vampires. None of that matters now–humans were taken off guard and will likely never recover.

Small areas of harmony can be established if people like Ares have any say in it.

This is the “Crow Version” of Book 1 in the “Kingdoms of Blood” series. The other version, Red Viper, features Sam Viper, a half dragon, and Darcia Deville, a tasmanian devil shapeshifter.

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The Dancing Crow: Version 2 of Book 1 (The Kingdoms of Blood) by [Des M. Astor, Michael  Allenson]

Rosie’s #Bookreview Of #UrbanFantasy GARKAIN by Anna J Walner

Garkain by Anna J. Walner

3.5 stars

Garkain is an urban fantasy set mainly in Australia. Raised through the foster care system in America, Amelia has recently been reacquainted with her real family, but she discovers that they are a family of Garkain, a branch of vampires. Amelia is told that she is a special child because her parents were a Garkain and a Larougo, similar to a werewolf, but from a forbidden union. Members of The Colony invite Amelia to visit their home to take part in an unbinding ceremony to unlock her paranormal powers. Just what those powers will be can only be speculated upon.

I liked the idea of the Australian setting, which was refreshing in this genre, but I thought that the story needed to put more emphasis on the Australian context, particularly with the dialogue and historical background. The storyline worked well, but occasionally it was rushed and left me wanting more details or explanations to make it all believable. The last third of the story was the weakest and I thought it needed a bit of reworking especially with the odd epilogue; it introduced new details which I felt would have worked better in the main narrative. This is the first story in this series and there were hints of what is to come, but I wouldn’t say that the ending hooked me enough to want to continue.

I read an ARC of this story, so some of my concerns may be resolved with the final publication.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book description

Amelia was dropped at a hospital in Houston 25 years ago. After searching for her biological family for years she receives a vague text: “It’s time for you to come home, we need you, the Colony needs you.”

The Colony is a secret society in the Outback of Australia, driven from Europe in 1788 to the prison colony of New Holland to begin anew. Her mother is Garkain, her father Larougo. Two different bloodlines, two different societies. One Vampire, one Werewolf. Given away instead of killed, she’s being called home for a purpose.

She’ll agree to things she thought she never would, become things she never thought existed, and agree to a bargain that will change the Colony forever.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS (available from June 25th 2021)

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #Fantasy #Romance The Starfolk Arcana (The Starfolk Trilogy Book 1) by @MarthaDunlop

Today’s team review is from Shelley, she blogs here https://shelleywilsonauthor.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Shelley has been reading The Starfolk Arcana by Martha Dunlop

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What a beautiful, mystical, and engaging novel!

The story follows Beth and Jonan, who are fated to be together. There are also a host of other characters who play important secondary roles in the development of the story and who add a deeper dimension and understanding to the lives of the main characters. Beth has hidden her psychic abilities incredibly well, but everything changes when she is drawn to the man with the violet eyes in such a way that confuses and frightens her.

When a ‘celeb’ begins to spread fear throughout the town by tapping into everyone’s fear of the spirit world, Beth and Jonan become targets. It’s up to them to stop her before she destroys everything. Jonan also has the task of helping Beth understand her destiny after he has spent many lifetimes searching for her. The link between the characters and the Starfolk Tarot pack was a lovely touch.

The author creates a rich world full of intrigue, well-rounded characters, and plenty of reference to spirituality and the psychic realm. If you’re a fan of this style of urban fantasy fiction, you’ll adore this book.

I loved all the characters and could connect easily with them. Beth is the strong, independent woman who guards herself against harm and who most of us girls can deeply relate to. Jonan is a careful hero, and Amelia is the bad element you love to hate! The author knows how to build relationships between the reader and the characters as you are fully invested within the first few chapters.

I look forward to seeing how the rest of the trilogy plays out.

I highly recommend it.

Book description

They’ve spent lifetimes being pulled apart. This time, they’re ready to fight.

After years of hiding her psychic abilities, Beth meets Jonan – the man with the violet eyes – and starts to feel like she belongs for the first time. Jonan has waited lifetimes to be with the woman who haunts his dreams. Drawn together by deeply buried memories from before birth, they try to make sense of a soul connection that opens windows into both their histories and their destiny.

But when a woman from Jonan’s past starts weaponising their emotions and stirring up hate, distrust and a fear of the supernatural, Beth and Jonan find themselves targeted in a wave of suspicion.

Only they can see what she is doing. But can they hold out against her bombardment and be true to who they really are, or will they allow The Fear to tear them apart?

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #Bookreview of #UrbanFantasy CURSED by J.A Cipriano

Cursed (The Thrice Cursed Mage, #1)Cursed by J.A. Cipriano

4 stars

Cursed Is book one of The Thrice Cursed Mage urban fantasy series.

Mac Brennan wakes up in a dustbin which is about to be emptied, knowing little more than his name. One arm is blackened with runes that he didn’t think he had before.

Stinking from other people’s rubbish, Mac goes to a laundrette hoping to steal some clean clothes. However, he gets involved in a fight to protect a woman from two thugs that he later discovers are werewolves.

In his search to find out who he is and why he can only remember wisps of images from his past, Mac joins a vampire and a druid in a daring kidnap rescue.

This is a fast paced action packed story with much fighting and talk of weaponry. The narrative flows smoothly as Mac causes chaos with his often outrageous behaviour towards others in the paranormal world.  I liked Mac and his action hero image. Some of the names of weapons that he used and other references to comic book heroes tended to go over my head, but generally I enjoyed this book.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book description

My name is Mac Brennan and that’s the only thing I can remember about myself. Not why I woke up in a dumpster. Not why my right arm is as black as pitch and covered in glowing red tattoos, and certainly not why a vicious death cult is after me.

Actually, that last part isn’t true. I know why the death cult is after me. It’s because I saved that damned girl from them. I didn’t know who she was at the time, but I’d have done it anyway. I just don’t like it when girls get beat up, call me old fashioned.

Still, I can tell she’s hiding something behind those devilish eyes, and if I want to find out what it is, I’ll have to help her.

My name is Mac Brennan. I have no memory, and I’m a werewolf-hunting, hellfire-flinging version of Faust himself.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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