Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT THE DCI JONES CASEBOOK: ELLIS FLYNN by @KerryJDonovan #Thriller

Today’s Team review is from Terry, she blogs at http://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

#RBRT Review Team

Terry has been reading The DCI Jones Casebook: Ellis Flynn by Kerry J Donovan

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THE DCI JONES CASEBOOK: Ellis Flynn by Kerry J Donovan

3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed by me as a member of Rosie Amber’s Review Team

I’ve read a couple of this author’s other books, and still like On Lucky Shores best, which I recommend highly. This one is a standard sort of British detective crime thriller, generally well planned out. I liked the plot itself, and thought the baddies were suitably horrible, very convincing. From what I can see, Mr Donovan certainly knows his stuff about police procedures, no problems there. Some reviews say the plot is a bit far-fetched, but this is fiction, isn’t it? It wasn’t a problem for me.

I thought where this book fell down was the characterisation/dialogue, which was, at times, almost like a something out of a comic book, or a spoof; Captain Jean-Luc, the French detective (‘Jean-Luc, the same as your Captain Picard in Star Trek’), came across like something out of 1980s comedy series ‘AlloAllo; he and Jones’s sidekick Alex, a Swedish Brigitte Nelson type, preface their English phrases with ‘how do you say‘ every five minutes, not forgetting Alex’s ‘ja‘ at the end of too many sentences, and their misunderstandings of English phrases ‘is this what is called in England being a butter-fingers?’ and something about uncovering ‘the Ring of the Vice‘. We know they’re French and Scandinavian; it’s not necessary to remind the reader every time they open their mouths. I couldn’t decide if it was meant to be spoof-like or not; I just found it irritating.

The book begins with the wonderfully depraved Ellis Flynn’s grooming of young teenager Hollie Jardine; this made for an excellent opening to pull the reader straight in, but was, alas, was let down by poor proofreading, and by the fact that part of the initial detective work hinged on the discovery of some photo booth pictures of Hollie and Ellis. Hollie was so excited about these, persuading Ellis to have them taken. This leapt out at me: do teenagers do the photo booth thing any more? I thought that was more something of 15 or 20 years ago; these days, teenagers take photos and videos on their phones, constantly. I know this is set in 2011, but virtually all teenagers had camera phones/smartphones by then.

I’m sorry not to give a better review, because Mr Donovan is a jolly good writer in so many ways, and I can see by others that this book has been received very well, so perhaps it’s just me! As far as the plot and suspense go it’s fine; it’s just the dialogue and proofreading that let it down—and I’d still read another book by him, especially if he wants to revisit Chet Walker from On Lucky Shores!

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com available free from Kindle Unlimited

 

Rosie’s Team #RBRT THE DCI JONES CASEBOOK: ELLIS FLYNN by @KerryJDonovan #Crime #TuesdayBookBlog

Today’s second team review is from Cathy, she blogs here http://betweenthelinesbookblog.com

#RBRT Review Team

Cathy has been reading The DCI Jones Casebook: Ellis Flynn by Kerry Donovan

The DCI Jones Casebook: Ellis Flynn by [Donovan, Kerry J]

Another excellent instalment in the DCI Jones Casebook series. When young Hollie Jardine goes missing DCI David Jones, head of the Midlands Police Serious Crime Unit, is on the case along with his partner DC Alexandra Olganski. Jones is near to retirement, but his determination to find Hollie is absolute, although he finds missing child cases very difficult. His friend and colleague, Phil Cryer, has a daughter who could look just like Hollie when she reached her teens and that makes the case hit home even more so.

Luckily CCTV caught some footage and he and Alex risk more than their jobs when they follow Hollie’s trail over the channel. What they discover there defies description. Both their lives will be affected.

Hollie has been groomed and persuaded to go away for a holiday by the loathsome Ellis Flynn. When Hollie arrives to meet Flynn and sees another man with him she becomes suspicious, having second thoughts, and is taken by force. From the start the indication is there’s a paedophile ring at work. These characters are portrayed brilliantly, even though they’re hateful, and the beginning of the story, coming from Flynn’s point of view is chilling. More so because it’s a scenario that could be all too real.

The procedural was fascinating to follow and David Jones is a compassionate and very likeable protagonist, regardless of his almost OCD tendencies. He hates mess anywhere but most especially in his own space. A sad past is hinted at and with his time as a father cut cruelly short, he has a solitary air, although certain of his colleagues are good friends. Kerry Donovan has given a good balance between the logistics of working the case and the individuals’ thoughts and feelings. It’s a multilayered story with a great cast of characters. I really enjoyed the interaction and working relationship between Jones and his French counterpart, Colonel Jean-Luc Coué, a great character. Both of them are firmly on the same page regarding the abduction, and worse, of young girls and the way the offenders should be dealt with.

This is a compelling and tension filled read, the timelines at the beginning of each chapter adding to the ‘race against time’ feel of the storyline. Just when it looks like the case is almost wrapped up, the plot escalates again with a completely unexpected twist. Then again, when it seems like everything has been in vain, another surprise. There’s one question left unanswered for which I have my own, hopefully right, guess. I’ll have to wait and see!

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com