‘A fairy tale version of Old Russia’. @deBieJennifer Reviews Vasilisa by @FarbMl, For Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT

Today’s team review is from Jenni. She blogs here https://jenniferdebie.com/

Rosie's #Bookreview Team #RBRT

Jenni has been reading Vasilisa by M L Farb

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It seems that I have accidentally read M.L. Farb’s Hearth and Bard Tales novels from back to front – and so we arrive at the third reviewed, and the first in the series, and what a glorious first it is. Intrinsically different from its sister-tales, but filled with the same wonder and beauty, Vasilisa follows (fittingly) a girl named Vasilisa in Ruska, or Russia of old. Born in the forest and raised as a serf, Vasilisa lives her life as an outcast because of her supernatural strength and the secret of her father’s heritage, a secret assiduously kept by her mother. Vasilisa’s only friend is Staver, the son of her master, and her only wish is to return to the serenity of the forest from whence she came.

As with all her other Hearth and Bard Tales, Farb weaves multiple threads from old fairy tale and myth to create the fabric of this novel. Likewise, as with the others, there is care and craft shown on every page. Vasilisa was not Farb’s first novel, but it is her first in this series, and even here, her skill in turning old threads into new tapestries shows. Where less practiced novelists might still be working out the kinks in their new series, the style of the Hearth and Bard Tales is already set and strong in Vasilisa.

As different from Fourth Sister and Heartless Hette as they are from each other, Vasilisa’s Ruska is a landscape all its own, full of forest groves, brutal winters, and wide plains. The balalaikas sing sweetly, the otters play freely, and the Tsar is (refreshingly, given the reality of Russian history) not so bad a guy. It is a fairytale version of a world, but certainly not without risk – bears and ogres lurk in the forest, a cruel mistress waits in the manor house, and far worse threatens beyond Ruska’s borders. This is a story about courage, and tests, and acceptance, even when revelations from the past threaten long-held convictions. It takes more than brute strength to win these battles, and more than pure wit to outsmart these enemies. Lucky then that we have a courageous heroin, as determined and strong as she is tricksy, to walk us through this first, spectacular entry into Farb’s Hearth and Bard Tales.

5/5

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“Forest born! Ogre child! You’re nothing but a demon wild!”

Vasilisa has always been strong. She’s strong enough to break the arm of the bully that daily taunts her. She won’t because she and her mother are servants at the Orlov manor, and her mother would be punished for her retaliation. Instead Vasilisa bides her time until she is sixteen and can return to the forest.

Only Staver, the master’s son, shows her kindness. His friendship pulls as strong as the forest, but their classes are divided forever by law. She is a forest born, fatherless servant and her future at the manor holds mockery filled drudgery.

War threatens. The forest calls. Will she stay to protect the one who can never be more than a friend, or flee to the peace that the forest offers?

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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‘For fans of shojo manga and fairytale alike.’ @deBieJennifer reviews The Fourth Sister by @FarbMl #TuesdayBookBlog

Today’s team review comes from Jenni. She blogs here https://jenniferdebie.com/

Rosie's #Bookreview Team #RBRT

Jenni has been reading The Fourth Sister by M.L. Farb

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Return to the magical world of the Hearth and Bard Tales for M.L. Farb’s second entry in the series with Fourth Sister. Set in Nihon, or a Japan of myth and mystery, Fourth Sister is a completely different creature from the Russian fable of Farb’s first Hearth and Bard novel, or the Germanic fairytale of her third.

Fourth Sister follows Shisei, the titular fourth sister of a family of seven, as she struggles to come to terms with the curse and fox that have stalked her throughout her life. Over the course of the novel Shisei leaves home, returns home, learns a trade, practices her poetry, and learns to accept herself because of her unique gifts, rather than in spite of them.

Unlike other fairytale-esque novels, probably the most refreshing thing about Fourth Sister is that this isn’t a romantic story. There is no quest for a prince or hunger for a husband here. If anything, the closest thing to a handsome prince we have in Fourth Sister is the antagonist, far from the romantic ideal. Yet, this is a love story, very much so. A familial love story. A sisterly story.

This is a novel about sacrifice and cleverness and the lengths a family of sisters will go to save one of their own, and the way Shisei, with seemingly nothing but bad luck and a curse, can offer her siblings. This is also a novel about misconceptions, fears, and the strength that comes with understanding—and what incredible things can be accomplished through it.

Delicately rendered with stunning details and the kind of attention that comes with love and care, Farb’s Nihon never feels like a caricature of Japanese history or culture. As with her other Hearth and Bard Tales, copious research obviously went into this novel, and I suspect consultations with a cultural expert, and that shows in every page.

Engaging, heartbreaking, and delightfully ticklish in places, this is a story for fans of shojo manga and fairy-tale alike. Farb is a born tale-spinner and with her Hearth and Bard Tales has given herself the latitude to explore a world of inspiration. Fourth Sister stands a testament to her talent, her ingenuity, and her heart for the worlds she creates.

5/5

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Shi, shi, fourth and death.
Fourth sister and twin to death.
Brother born silent.

Blamed for her twin brother’s death, Shisei, the outcast fourth of seven sisters, apprentices herself to a mask maker; but when the local Kazoku accuses the youngest sister of killing his son, Shisei must lead her sisters in a deception that will either save the youngest or condemn them all.

Fourth Sister is a Japanese fairy tale retelling with sparse poetry and gold-mended brokenness. A Studio Ghibli type story which invokes reflection.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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