Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT OIL & WATER by @pjlazos environmental #Thriller #fridayreads

Today’s Team Review is from E.L Lindley, she blogs here http://lindleyreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

#RBRT Review Team

E.L has been reading Oil & Water by P.J Lazos

Oil and Water by P.J. Lazos is an expansive, well written novel which follows the fate of two families. The families couldn’t be more different but Lazos draws us into their separate worlds before bringing them together in a spectacular denouement.

The novel is written in three parts and the first part introduces us to the Tirabi family and the Coleman/Hartos family, both of whom suffer unspeakable tragedies that shatter all of their lives. Lazos’ skill as a writer is very much in evidence as she builds up suspense and danger whilst at the same time getting the reader to really care about her characters and also highlighting the perils of not caring for the environment.

The Tirabi family are the obvious choice for winning the readers’ hearts. Patriarch, Marty, invents a machine called the TDU which can turn any carbon based object into oil. This machine will clearly revolutionise the oil industry but Marty and his political strategist wife, Ruth, are murdered before he can complete the project. This leaves their four children adrift and it’s their plight and relationships that, to me, is the heart of the novel.

My favourite character is Kori, Marty and Ruth’s flaky, twenty something daughter, who is suddenly thrust into the role of provider and mother figure to her younger siblings – especially Gil, the youngest who’s only eight years old. Her feelings of oppressive responsibility lead her into making wrong choices which Lazos presents in a way that’s both realistic and moving.

Running parallel to the Tirabi children, Lazos also invites us into the lives of Bicky Coleman, the CEO of Akanabi Oil and his grieving, chemical engineer son-in-law, David ‘Hart’ Hartos. Bicky is a ruthless business man whose orbit Hart has become embroiled in through his marriage to Bicky’s daughter. From the onset, Bicky is surrounded by intrigue and corruption and the ripples of his dissatisfaction and misery damn everyone he comes into contact with.

In part two of the novel the Akanabi Oil Company is responsible for an oil spill and Lazos uses Hart to demonstrate the repercussions of this on the environment. He is sent by Bicky to help clean up the damage and working alongside the Wildlife Rescue Centre he comes face to face with the horrific damage that oil causes to birds and other wildlife. Lazos also depicts how big business and the government are in league with each other so that the importance of safety and environmental issues are overlooked in favour of profit.

Additionally Lazos uses part two of her novel to show the impact the oil industry has had on the Middle East. Robbie Tirabi, the second eldest of the Tirabi children, enlists into the military and is sent to Iraq. He soon realises that the unrest in that region has been caused by the way so many people such as the “marsh Arabs” have been displaced to make way for the oil industry.

Whilst Robbie is in Iraq, the remaining Tirabis give an interview to the Philadelphia Inquirer and news of the TDU spreads. As Hart becomes more and more disillusioned with the oil business he feels compelled to find the family and discovers a kindred spirit in Gil, a gifted child who has the ability to finish off what his father began. The Tirabis come to represent the sense of family that Hart has been missing but their work on the TDU stirs up terrible danger.

Lazos’ novel is an interesting combination of factual and spiritual. The reality of the impact that unbridled capitalism and human greed can have on the world is offset by the way the Tirabi children are visited by the spirits of their dead parents who guide them to make the right choices. Gil in particular has the ability to see into the future and connect with the spirit world.

I really enjoyed Oil and Water, as it’s both engaging and thought provoking. It’s not an easy read but if you’re looking for something more substantial than a conventional pot boiler then it’s well worth the effort.

Book Description

When inventor Martin Tirabi builds a machine that converts trash into oil it sends shockwaves through the corporate halls of the oil cognoscenti. Weeks later, Marty and his wife, Ruth are killed in a mysterious car accident. Their son, Gil, a 10-year old physics prodigy is the only one capable of finishing the machine that could solve the world’s energy problems.  Plagued with epilepsy from birth, Gil is also psychic, and through dreams and the occasional missive from his dead father he gets the push he needs to finish the job.
Meanwhile, Bicky Coleman, head of Akanabi Oil is doing his best to smear the planet in it. From a slow leak in the Gulf of Mexico to the most devastating oil spill the Delaware River has ever seen, Akanabi’s corporate practices are leaving oily imprints in their wake. To divert the tide of bad press, Bicky dispatches his son-in-law and Chief Engineer, David Hartos to clean up his mess.  A disillusioned Hart, reeling from the recent death of his wife and unborn child, travels to Philadelphia to fulfill his father-in-law’s wishes.
There’s no such thing as coincidence when Hart meets Gil and agrees to help him finish Marty’s dream machine. But how will he bring such a revolutionary invention to market in a world reliant on fossil fuels and awash in corporate greed?  To do so, Hart must confront those who would quash the project, including his own father-in-law.
You’ll find murder, mystery, and humor as black as fine Arabian crude filling the pages of Oil and Water. The characters are fictional, but the technology is real. What will we do when the oil runs out? 

About the author

P. J. Lazos

Pam Lazos’ passions run deep and wide, however for brevity’s sake, let’s just say, mainly:  her family, writing, and the environment. She is a former correspondent for her local newspaper (Lancaster Intelligencer Journal); a literary magazine contributor (Rapportage); on the Board of Advisors for the wH2O Journal, the Journal of Gender and Water (U of Penn); a once and sometimes editor and ghostwriter; author of a children’s book (Into the Land of the Loud); and of the novel (Oil In Water), about oil spills and green technology, posted by chapter on her lifestyle and literary blog (Persephone’s Stepsisters) co-authored with friend, Cynthia Gregory; and, because it’s cool, a beekeeper’s apprentice. By day, she toils as an environmental lawyer, chasing eco-scofflaws; in her spare nano-seconds, and with the blessing of her family, she writes. Her heart embraces these ephemeral joys and more, especially laughter.

Goodreads | AmazonUK | AmazonUS | Twitter

RISE SISTER RISE by Rebecca Campbell @rebeccathoughts #NonFiction #SundayBlogShare

Rise Sister Rise: A Guide to Unleashing the Wise, Wild Woman WithinRise Sister Rise: A Guide to Unleashing the Wise, Wild Woman Within by Rebecca Campbell
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Four Point Five Stars

Rise Sister Rise is a non-fiction guide for those ready for change in their life circumstances, whether at a crossroads in life, a desire to stand up and be heard, or a need to follow a dream.

Rebecca Campbell firmly believes we are at a crucial point in our world development, ending thousands of years of oppression and darkness caused by religion and power hungry world leaders. Our planet is dying under current human abuse; people are lost, hurt and angry.

This book is “a call to arms for women to rise up, tell their truth and lead using their innate powers and wisdom.”

They can do this through the support systems and strengths of sisterhood. There have always been wise women, healers, medicine women, priestesses and visionaries. Campbell sees women all over the world awakening to what has been locked and hidden away inside them. Courageous, encouraging, passionate, compassionate, confident, self-assured, radiant women.

In this new high speed electronic world, we have forgotten to listen to the planet we inhabit, to work with its seasons and the cycles of the waxing and waning moon. Each season of the year has different components; spring is full of new life and energy, winter is for sleep, rest and recuperation. But many of us try to live our whole year at high-speed with maximum energy output and it is unhealthy for us, we fill up with stimulants and are constantly exhausted.

Campbell suggests remembering what makes us women, celebrating the strengths being a women brings and getting back our passion to change things in our worlds for the better.

This isn’t a book just about feminism, it is about reclaiming ourselves and saving the world.

View all my reviews Goodreads

Book Description

Rise Sister Rise is for the women who agreed at soul level to be here at this stage in history to lead this global shift that the mystics of all of the ages have predicted: the return of the mother and the rise of the feminine. It is essentially a call to arms for women to rise up, tell their truth, and lead.
Most women have spent much of their working lives “making it” in a man’s world, leaning on patriarchal methods of survival in order to succeed, dulling down their intuition, and ignoring the fierce power of their feminine. They have ignored the cycles of the feminine in order to survive in a patriarchal linear system – but now the world has changed.

Rise Sister Rise is a transmission that calls the innate feminine wisdom to rise. It is about healing the insecurities, the fears, and the inherited patterns that stop women trusting the Shakti (power) and wisdom (intuition) that effortlessly flows through them. It’s about recognizing all of the ways we have been keeping ourselves contained and restrained in effort to fit into a certain archetype of woman. It’s about co-creating a whole new archetype of woman – a woman who does not keep herself small in order to make others feel more comfortable. A woman who knows like she knows like she knows that she is not her body weight, her sexual partners, or her career. A woman who deeply respects the wise woman in her life and cultivates her own wisdom every single day.

Full of tools, calls to action, contemplative questions, rituals, and confrontational exercises, this book teaches women that it is safe to let Shakti rise, safe to trust their intuition, and safe to take leaps of faith – because in healing ourselves we are healing the world.

About the author

Rebecca Campbell

Rebecca Campbell is a Hay House author, grounded intuitive, spiritual mentor, six sensory teacher and co-creator of The Spirited Project.

Goodreads | AmazonUk | AmazonUS | Twitter

THE SHACK by Wm Paul Young #BookReview #Spiritual #Theology #Philosophy #Religion

The ShackThe Shack by Wm. Paul Young
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The Shack is a book which falls into the spiritual, theology, philosophy and Christian fiction categories for me, I wouldn’t want to give it just one label as it covers a multitude of areas, but definitely covers the trinity of God, Jesus and the holy spirit.

The story-line revolves around Mackenzie Phillips and a weekend spiritual experience in a shack. Not just any shack, but the shack where police suspect his child was brutally abused, before her certain death.

Mack’s a mess and has been since Missy went missing whilst on a camping trip with Mack and her brother and sister. He blames himself and it is affecting home-life. One day Mack gets a message inviting him to the shack, he doesn’t know if it’s real or a hoax or the killer. He packs his wife and family off to see friends and then heads out on a wintry journey alone, to the shack.

The story of his experience is enlightening, he meets a God persona, a man named Jesus and an almost ethereal woman called Sarayu. They welcome him with love and work on his deep emotional wounds and beliefs in a weekend that he’ll never forget.

When reality returns Mack has one hell of a story to tell and a changed outlook for the future.

This book will easily be a marmite read, it was definitely a challenge with areas I found hard to understand and some which need re-reading. Overall the story is an interesting one and heart-breaking to hear Mack’s detailed life up to his visit to the Shack.

It’s one of those books where everyone will have an opinion and get something different from it because it chooses to use a religious theme, a topic which almost every reader will have experienced in one form or another. So as people have debated religion for millennia, so might they debate the subject matter within this book and how it is handled.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book Description

Mackenzie Allen Philips’ youngest daughter, Missy, has been abducted during a family vacation, and evidence that she may have been brutally murdered is found in an abandoned shack deep in the Oregon wilderness. Four years later in the midst of his “Great Sadness,” Mack receives a suspicious note, apparently from God, inviting him back to that shack for a weekend.

Against his better judgment he arrives at the shack on a wintry afternoon and walks back into his darkest nightmare. What he finds there will change Mack’s world forever.

In a world where religion seems to grow increasingly irrelevant The Shack wrestles with the timeless question, “Where is God in a world so filled with unspeakable pain?” The answers Mack gets will astound you and perhaps transform you as much as it did him. You’ll want everyone you know to read this book!

Find a copy here from Goodreads | AmazonUK | AmazonUS

#FridayBookShare THE SHACK by Wm Paul Young @ShelleyWilson72

Welcome to a #FridayBookShare post it’s been a while since I joined in with this game created by Shelley Wilson

#FridayBookShare

#FridayBookShare

With the weekend approaching it’s the perfect time to seek out new books to read, so Shelley has created a Friday Book Share game to help search for that ideal read.

First line of the book.

“Who wouldn’t be sceptical when a man claims to have spent an entire weekend with God, in a shack no less? And this was the shack.”

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb.

Mackenzie Allen Philips’ youngest daughter, Missy, has been abducted during a family vacation, and evidence that she may have been brutally murdered is found in an abandoned shack deep in the Oregon wilderness. Four years later in the midst of his “Great Sadness,” Mack receives a suspicious note, apparently from God, inviting him back to that shack for a weekend.

Against his better judgment he arrives at the shack on a wintry afternoon and walks back into his darkest nightmare. What he finds there will change Mack’s world forever.

In a world where religion seems to grow increasingly irrelevant The Shack wrestles with the timeless question, “Where is God in a world so filled with unspeakable pain?” The answers Mack gets will astound you and perhaps transform you as much as it did him. You’ll want everyone you know to read this book!

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Mack: Hurt, angry, judgmental.

Delightful design

1812457

Audience appeal

Those interested in spiritual life, religion, Christian fiction, theology, philosophy.

Your favourite line/scene.

“Well, Mackenzie, don’t just stand there gawkin’ with your mouth open like your pants are full”, said the big black woman as she turned and headed across the deck, talking the whole time. “Come and talk to me while I get supper on.”

Find a copy here from Goodreads | AmazonUK | AmazonUS

Anyone can have a go – all you need to do is answer the following questions based on the book you are currently reading/finished reading this week and use the hashtag #FridayBookShare

First line of the book.

Recruit fans by adding the book blurb.

Introduce the main character using only three words.

Delightful design (add the cover image of the book).

Audience appeal (who would enjoy reading this book?)

Your favourite line/scene.