Derek’s Revenge by Mac Black

Derek's RevengeDerek’s Revenge by Mac Black

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Derek Toozlethwaite is a journalist in Newingsworth who is trying to write a book. So far he has failed to find a suitable subject for his book, instead his research has got him into trouble. He’s also been thinking about his past, he’s never known his Mum, Granny and Grandad Smith raised him and there has never been any talk about his Mum.

Fans of Derek know that his life if full of crazy adventures and comical characters and to this end we find Derek quickly in trouble stuck sideways inside a caravan in a ditch with Hammy. With the help of the local fire brigade the rusty relic finally finds its way into Derek’s garden.

Café owner Anton, provides Derek with an idea for his book when he reminisces about a local rock band, who once used the café as their meeting place. They later found fame in America calling themselves Rabid Revenge. Derek decides he’ll write up the story behind the band and sets out to hunt down the band members.

There’s a surprising romance for Hammy, another falling out between Derek and wife Sally and Grandad is accused of stalking a lovely young American lady in Bisko’s supermarket. Will Derek get the story he needs? And finally write his book Rabid Revenge Revisited?

Another greatly entertaining book in the Derek series written by Scottish author Mac Black, with his distinctive style of comedy.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

View all my reviews on Goodreads.

Guest Author R.R. Gall

Today our guest is Richard, R Gall, author of yesterday’s book The Wrath Inside, here is a link to the post if you missed it. http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-51U

RR Gall

Let’s find out more about Richard and his writing.

1) Where is your home town?
   I live in Dumfries, Scotland.
2) How long have you been writing?
   As I’m getting on a bit now, it’s been quite a long time. I’ve dabbled away since my twenties but only started properly when the big 50 hit me for 6.
3) What genres do you enjoy writing?
   Usually murder/mysteries: the crime giving a peg to hang everything on.
4) Where did the idea for The Wrath Inside come from?
   It started by wanting to know what life was like at that time. Just basic things like: what they ate, how they made a living, their views, and how much, or, indeed, how little they knew of the world. With that in mind, I decided to set the story in a small, ordinary town.
   Also, as part of the research, I read old and modern translations of The Bible and was surprised by how the resonance changed with the language. So I tried to write something that would feel contemporary: hopefully showing that people have changed little through the years and that events in the book are no different to ones going on in places round the world today.
5) Tell us some of the historical background to the area which this book is set in at the time of AD 15
   There had been many different conquerors over the years (Persians, Greeks, etc) and now The Romans were in charge. But unease was growing – people wanted to be free from oppression. Revolts flared up, only to be sharply quashed.
6) What illnesses were both Ezera’s parents suffering from?
   There is more in the next story.
7) What jobs did Ezera and his friends have in their day to day life?
   In the area where the story is set, most would have worked the land. There would be set chores in the home as well. They would also be expected to study Scripture and Law.
8) Joseph Caiaphas had a lot of power over the people, how would Rome have dealt with this threat?
   I doubt if the Romans would have been all that bothered by the priest – as long as he did not overstep the mark. Similarly, High Priest Annas wielded great power for a long time but was only deposed after taking things a bit too far – perhaps sentencing people to death. However, he remained influential, in the background, for many more years to come.
9) Tell us about your trilogy.
   The Dumfries Detective Trilogy is a murder/mystery set of stories. It consists of: The Case of the Pig in the Evening Suit, The Case of Colourful Clothes and Kilts, The Case of the Hermit’s Guest Bedroom.
   As the titles suggest, there is supposed to be some fun in them but, also, enough thrills and spills to keep the tension going right through to the last book.
   Unusually, this amateur detective, Jin Johnstone, is not very good at what he does – although he is well-intentioned. Nevertheless, as the trilogy progresses, it is possible to see him improve as a detective, and, almost as importantly, as a man.
   All the action takes place in and around the Scottish town of Dumfries – taking in its sights and its colourful characters.
10) What are you working on at the moment? Do you have an expected publication date for fans?
    I’m writing a (slightly different) police procedural murder/mystery, set in Glasgow. It will be out at the summer.
The Wrath Inside
Find a copy on Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com.

Guest Author Olivia Stocum

Today our guest is Olivia Stocum author of yesterday’s book “Moonstone”  and last weeks book “Dawning”. Here are links to those posts. Moonstone: http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-4UA Dawning: http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-4T3

Let’s find out more about Olivia and her writing.

Olivia Stocum Author

1) Where is your home town?

I live in Owego, New York, a historic town by a river that floods at little too often for comfort, in a two hundred and fourteen year old house, that has the uncanny ability to be completely surrounded by water and yet still not succumb to the rising floods.

2) Tell us the significance of the title “Moonstone”

Originally Moonstone was meant as a description of my hero, William’s eyes. There is something in the Celtic gene pool that produces very dark hair with pale gray eyes. (Which is what William looks like.) Eventually, it came to mean more… but you’ll have to read the book to find out.

3) Where is Moonstone set?

Historic Scotland, early 1600’s, in the North Highlands. The exact location is completely fictional.

4) I don’t think I’ve read the word “Kilt” in your book? Is there a historical reason?

Yes. The kilt as we know it did not exist until the late 1700’s. I know some writers use the term anyway, but I’m kind of a stickler about such things. You’ll also note that I don’t use the word Sporran  for the same reason.

5) I love your rugged brave Scottish men, tell us how William got his shoulder injury.

William was injured in a battle in Sweden, where it was common for young Scottish men to hire themselves out as soldiers.

6) You had fun with some Gaelic words in this book, tell us a couple that William was caught saying.

LOL. Yes, he was caught, wasn’t he.

Here’s a few of the words used in the book:

Mo leannan – this means, my darling, sweetheart, love …

Bean sídhe – A female fairy, otherwise known as a banshee. Often she heralds the coming of doom. (Which sounds awful, but when William first met Rhiannon she was tied up with rope, and he got some of her blood on him. He knew their destinies where somehow intertwined, but he wasn’t entirely sure why or to what end.)    

Fey – Again associated with fairies, meaning one who is destined for tragedy.

Tha gràdh agam ort – I love you, or literally, I have love on you. Rhiannon is actually the one to say this (at least in Gaelic anyway)

 7) Tell us the motives behind Reginald’s actions.

Laird Reginald was a troubled man from an abusive past. I felt bad for him, really, and wished there was some help for him, but there weren’t any therapists around in the 1600’s, and William had to deal with Reginald for what he was; a threat to his family.

8) If I was around in the 1600’s I think I’d want to be rescued by some of the men in your books, who is your favourite?

Oh boy, you ask a lot of me. Let’s see… Ronan (from Dawning) is my beef head. He can be a tad dense, especially when it comes to women, but he’s completely loyal to Triona. William is my strong, sensitive guy. Unfortunately, he loves a little too deeply, and that makes him overprotective to the point of sometimes smothering Rhiannon. Then there’s Graham, my giant Norse throw-back. On the surface he’s a bear. Inside, he’s a big softy. And lastly, there’s Alec. He’s young and has a few lessons to learn about love, but his current broken heart won’t last forever…

OK, so I didn’t pick a favourite, and I don’t think I ever could! I love them all for who they are, AND for who they will become.

9) I did enjoy all the Scottish vocabulary, which of those words did you enjoy using the most?

Probably mo leannan, but I like all of it.

10) I feel there’s a story to be told for young Graham next, what do you think?

Absolutely. In fact, that is why he wasn’t present at the beginning of the book. While he was away visiting his niece, I was busy getting him in over his head with a certain young noble woman.

Moonstone by Olivia Stocum

Find a copy of Moonstone here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Dawning: Historical Romance

Find a copy of Dawning here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

I’ll certainly keep a look out for the next book in the series.

Moonstone by Olivia Stocum

Moonstone by Olivia StocumMoonstone by Olivia Stocum by Olivia Stocum

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Moonstone is the second Scottish historical romance that I have recently read by author Olivia Stocum. Set just a few years later than her previous book “Dawning” this one begins in 1607 and continues to revolve around some of the characters that I fell in love with.

Handsome Laird William MacAlastair has never found a women who could match his first love until his eyes fell upon the dishevelled and captured Rhiannon. Ankles and wrists tied, dirty and bruised, Rhiannon is dumped on the court floor of Laird Geoffrey Buchanan. Treated like a market item Rhiannon is to become Geoffrey’s wife unless someone can help her escape.

Stuck between his fierce Scottish pride and his promise never to force Rhiannon to do anything she doesn’t want to, William battles with himself, the men and mostly with his most valuable possession yet. Just how vulnerable can a brave Highlander get before he gives his heart completely?

This book can be read as a stand alone or better still alongside Dawning to embrace yourself with some hearty romance.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Olivia will be our Guest Author tomorrow here on the blog.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

The Royal Descendant by John P Ford

The Royal DescendantThe Royal Descendant by John P. Ford

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
The Royal Descendant follows the idea of Elizabeth I having an illegitimate child and thus providing an heir to the English throne. History books tell us that Elizabeth died without a true heir and the throne went to Scotland. Throughout history many royals had illegitimate children and more than one pretender has been backed by powerful supporters.

John Ford uses this idea and weaves a complex tale around the secret baby. Taking 13 years to complete, this book is full of very detailed research. The chapters go back and forth between different time settings capturing the lives of the many characters.

I liked the opening scene, the shocking murder of an innocent vicar and the leaving of a mysterious calling card. I also liked the jump to 1575 and Kenilworth Castle where we have several close scenes between Elizabeth and Robert Dudley.

There then follows a plot which entwines the search for descendants from the secret child and a growing list of murdered people which threatens to reach its final victim. The National Criminal Intelligence Service, Mi5, the police and several other security services are involved in the search for the person ultimately behind the plot to replace the Queen with the true heir to the English throne.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

View all my reviews on Goodreads.

Dawning by Olivia Stocum

Dawning: Historical RomanceDawning: Historical Romance by Olivia Stocum

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Set in Scotland in 1599, Dawning is a historical romance. Triona MacAlastair fell in love with Ronan at a tender young age. Now they are older she has eyes only for him. But Ronan wants land, money and respect before he will feels worthy of Triona.

She must let Ronan go and waits everyday day for his return, but after 4 years of waiting she begins to wonder if he’ll ever come back. Triona finds comfort in another, but still yearns for her man.

Rumours spread of a warrior known as Blackhawk and Triona’s father seeks him out to protect Triona when her life becomes endangered. The path to love is never smooth and Triona battles with herself and the men in her life, will she ever be able to capture and keep the one she truly desires?

This was a well written love story and I enjoyed all the battles of strong wills and frustrations that the characters went through. There was some lovely settings and I could almost smell the Scottish heather myself.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Olivia featured this book as part of our Romancing September Tour, here is a link to the interview Olivia gave about her work. http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-2qK

Her second book in the series will be reviewed here on the blog on March 11th followed the next day by a guest author interview.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Guest Author Mac Black

Today our guest is author Mac Black. Yesterday I reviewed his first book in the “Derek” series, “Please call me Derek” here is a link to the review. http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-4nZ

Mac Black

Now let’s find out more about Mac and his writing.

MAC BLACK

 

Where is your hometown?

If a home is just an address then I have had a few, but, of course, home is much more than that. There are three places that stand out for me, and all in Scotland. Glasgow was where I was born and brought up – a long time ago! That was in days when ships were built in large numbers on the River Clyde. Back then I worked as a ship draughtsman. A dramatic reduction in the demand for Clyde-built ships, not caused by me I hasten to add, meant a change of employer and of home. I moved to a new job in Dundee, quite a transition, and my family went from living in the big city of Glasgow to the small town of Carnoustie. We were settled there for a long time. It was a great town for two young daughters to grow up in, being not too large and on the coast, and with plenty of local activities. I became a small-town person from then. One further move has occurred, to another small town, to our most recent home in Cupar, a country town in the north of Fife. My wife and I have no plans to move again – at least, I have no plans …but who knows! I await further instructions

 

How long have you been writing?

Although I enjoyed creating amusing poems when I was younger, it was only when I retired from ‘real work’ that I tried ‘real writing’, and Autumn, 2009, was when I first put pen to paper as a writer of prose. (Umm, no… not strictly true as I have always had the luxury of writing with the aid of a computer, though, when I pay bills, my pen does still function – very reluctantly – to sign cheques.)  My first book was mainly factual, based on our family tree. That first attempt was lovingly created by hand – all my own work, writing, printing and binding, three copies only, a learning experience. Finding a publisher was never contemplated back then, it was a novelty and fun. Fiction was not attempted until the next year, in 2010. Another year later, and, after a very short search, I was lucky enough to find a publisher with a sense of humour who was interested in my work.

Where did the idea for “Please… Call me Derek” come from?

After a few false starts, I concluded that serious writing was not hitting the mark. As an amateur-dramatics performer many years ago I preferred comedy roles, so, attempting to write something light-hearted became the thought. My inspiration was to create a special character, one with a fairly unusual name who would gain sympathy through self-inflicted mishaps in simple everyday situations. To be honest, the plot just developed page by page, and, to my own amazement, eventually, I had created a ‘Derek’ story. I tried it out on a few friends, and was delighted to have some good feedback.

Apart from Derek my favourite character was Grandad Smith, which was yours?

As the creator of what is becoming a large fictional family, I really shouldn’t admit to having favourites. That would only cause jealousy and friction amongst them all and that would not be a good idea, now, would it? However, if you read each story you will find that the different characters take turns at playing centre stage in the various tales. Of course, Derek is the pivotal character always. He has to be my shining example of a hapless hero!

“Thelma” adds to the complications in the book, can you tell the readers why Sally’s Aunt Thelma was estranged from the family?

She was a naughty girl, and we all know what happens to naughty girls, don’t we? Continually falling-out with her father and her twin brother, when she was young, led to her leaving home as soon as she could. She has remained an outcast for most of her life, but, it shouldn’t have to continue forever like that. Perhaps she could become part of the family again? Would that be a good turn of events – maybe for her to become reconciled with them, now that she is older? Do you think that she could control her temper, and make peace with her brother, if she were promised a starring role in a ‘Derek’ book? What a brilliant idea! Yes, I might try that!

‘Sweaty’ and ‘Spider’ are great nicknames which you handle really well in the book, how much fun did you have thinking up these nicknames?

Being called ‘Blackie’ by my young pals is one of my own happy memories. We all had them, nicknames. As youngsters, using actual first names felt too proper, and using a surname was reserved for persons in authority, such as the hated schoolteacher, the minister – and the probation officer. A nickname back then was comforting, binding you to your pals – unless it was one you disliked, of course! Anyway, for Derek’s pals in his pre-school gang days, Toozlethwaite was a mouthful; with their childhood lisps it became ‘Thwaity’, and later progressed to ‘Sweaty’. As for Spider, well, that is a generational thing: his dad was called that – and his Grandad too, and, with him being tall and lanky, what other name could he possibly have?

The kidnappers only get £3000; do you think the absurdity of it is classic British comedy?

I’d like to think so. Having the bad guys win never seems morally correct for me, but then again when I write, unfortunately, the good guys tend to lose out too. Is it just me…?

Derek’s story continues in the next three books, can you give the readers a little hint as to what to expect?

One thing for certain is that Derek will inadvertently land himself in more trouble. If he gets married would you expect his life to become perfect? No, of course not! If he delves into his family history, will he find a few surprises? Yes, of course he will! Will he eventually find a subject for his longed-for book? Maybe, but you’ll have to read the stories to find the real answers to the questions, won’t you? Oh, and will he ever be rid of his nickname…?

Are you planning more Derek books?

To date, four books exist in the series, on the shelves as Paperbacks, and also accessible as Kindle versions. ‘Please…Call me Derek’, ‘Derek’s in Trouble’, ‘Derek’s Revenge’, they all came out during 2012; the fourth, ‘Derek’s Good Relations’, has only just been released in December 2013. The stories are in chronological order related to Derek’s adult life, and it is worth while reading them in sequence – if you dare to become hooked!

Do you have the publication date of your next book ready to whet the appetite of fans?

The fifth book is still a ‘work in progress’. It is called ‘Derek’s Secrets’ and is due for publication during 2014. Now, I need a favour, would somebody be good enough to tell me what this fifth story is supposed to be about? …Please!

Please... Call Me Derek

“Please Call Me Derek! and other books in the series available from Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com

Thank you Mac, I look forward to reading more of the Derek stories.

Ghost in the Machine by Ed James

Ghost in the Machine (Scott Cullen Mysteries #1)Ghost in the Machine by Ed James

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Set in Scotland this is a murder mystery. Police are called in when a woman goes missing, when she turns up murdered things become more serious. Little evidence and dead end trails follow until body number two turns up. A larger investigation gets underway and a third woman goes missing. I won’t say any more about the storyline. It is well written with lots of local dialect and phrases. There are good relationships between the characters. The book does contain strong language. It kept me guessing up to the end.

Find a copy of this book from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com currently free on Kindle at the time of posting.

View all my reviews on Goodreads.

Guest Author Jamie Baywood

Today my guest on the blog is Jamie Baywood and her book Getting Rooted in New Zealand.

Jamie Baywood authorLet’s find out more about Jamie;

1) Where is your home town?

Petaluma, California.

2) You wrote your book from diary entries, have you always liked writing?

I didn’t start keeping a diary or writing until I moved to New Zealand. Getting Rooted in New Zealand is a collection of my emails, memories, and dairy entries. It seemed natural to organize the book in chronological order in dairy format.

3) Can you tell our readers what made you choose to go to New Zealand?

Growing up in California, it was always my dream to live abroad. I found a work abroad company that helped young Americans get work visas in New Zealand and Australia. I had been watching a lot of Flight of the Conchords at the time and enjoyed Bret and Jemaine’s sense of humour and accents.

I had bad dating experiences in California and read in a New Zealand tour book that the country’s population at 100,000 fewer men than women.  I wanted to have some me time and an adventure. New Zealand seemed like a good place to do so.

4) How long did you plan to initially stay in New Zealand?

I had a 12 month visa, but I literally had no plans.

5) What type of jobs did your work visa allow you to do? Would you like to see a change in this type of visa?

The visa I was on only permitted me to work temporary positions. This greatly limited my options.

As crazy as my job experiences were in New Zealand, I would actually like to return to New Zealand and give it another try working as a writer. It would be great to return to New Zealand to make Getting Rooted in New Zealand into a TV show.

6) I believe the cost of living shocked you, can you give us some examples?

It was mostly the cost of fresh produce at grocery stores like bell peppers and cucumbers were $5 each. It would have been ideal to have a garden and grow my own veggies.

7) Tell us about “Performing” stories from your adventures. Where did you perform them?

I was very lucky in New Zealand to meet a lot of talented people outside of work. I had the opportunity to write and perform for Thomas Sainsbury the most prolific playwright in New Zealand. I performed a monologue about my jobs in the Basement Theatre in Auckland.

The funny thing about that experience was Tom kept me separated from the other performers until it was time to perform. I was under the impression that all the performers were foreigners giving their experiences in New Zealand.  All of the other performers were professional actors telling stories that weren’t their own. At first I was mortified, but the audience seemed to enjoy my “performance,” laughing their way through my monologue. After the shows we would go out and mingle with the audience. People would ask me how long I had been acting. I would tell them, “I wasn’t acting; I have to go to work tomorrow and sit next to the girl wearing her dead dog’s collar.” No one believed I was telling the truth.

8) How did meeting Grant change your views on meeting men?

I’ve always loved men, too much in fact. I didn’t escape California because I hated men; I left because I was perplexed by how to date.  I had one boyfriend from the age of fourteen to twenty-three. There were a lot of life experiences and things I should have learned in high school and at university that I didn’t.  After my first relationship ended I felt like a zoo animal released into the wild. I had no idea how to date and for a few years was completed bombarded by unwanted suitors in California.

By the time I meet Grant at the age of twenty-seven, I had fulfilled my dream of living abroad, been single for over a year and felt healed from previous heartbreaks. Grant had been in a long term relationship since he was a teen as well. He was more clueless about dating than I was. I found comfort in our mutual awkwardness.  Grant was very different than the guys I dated in California. We spent the first couple months going on long walks and talking. It reminded me an old-fashion courtship. I knew very early into dating him that he would be my husband.

9) At the end of your book you were hoping to move to Scotland to find a college course, did this work out?

 We didn’t stay in Scotland to study as planned. For unwanted complicated reasons, we had to move to England to study.  I have just completed a one year MA in Design. Designing my book cover was my dissertation project.  Grant is in middle of a two year MA in Landscape Architecture he will be done in 2014. We plan to move when his course is completed.

10) I know you a had a sneak look on the internet at holding a wedding in a Scottish Castle, did you fulfil this dream?

We got married in a little castle in Scotland at the beginning of year 2012. My husband wore a kilt. I was hoping for a white winter wedding, but we ended up getting sunshine in Scotland during the winter. It was a magical day; we had a rainbow over a loch, bunny rabbits hoping by us, birds chirping and a full moon reflecting on the loch at night.

Getting Rooted in New Zealand is available in paperback and eBook on Amazon:  http://www.amazon.com/dp/1482601907 and Amazon.co.uk

Jamie Baywood can be followed on:

Facebook.com/jamiebaywood
Twitter.com/jamiebaywood
Pinterest.com/jamiebaywood
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7069448.Jamie_Baywood
amazon.com/author/jamiebaywood

Getting Rooted in New ZealandGetting Rooted in New Zealand book description:
Craving change and lacking logic, at 26, Jamie, a cute and quirky Californian, impulsively moves to New Zealand to avoid dating after reading that the country’s population has 100,000 fewer men. In her journal, she captures a hysterically honest look at herself, her past and her new wonderfully weird world filled with curious characters and slapstick situations in unbelievably bizarre jobs. It takes a zany jaunt to the end of the Earth and a serendipitous meeting with a fellow traveler before Jamie learns what it really means to get rooted.
About the author Jamie Baywood:
Jamie Baywood grew up in Petaluma, California. In 2010, she made the most impulsive decision of her life by moving to New Zealand. Getting Rooted in New Zealand is her first book about her experiences living there. Jamie is now married and living happily ever after in the United Kingdom. She is working on her second book.

I’d like to Thank Jamie for being our guest today.

Romancing September author Lizzie Lamb (Day 16)

Day 16 on our Romancing September Across the World Tour and today we welcome author Lizzie Lamb to the blog with her book “Tall, Dark and Kilted”. Later you can join Lizzie over in Georgia with Stephanie, when they discuss writing romance today’s society.

Lizzie Lamb authorLet’s find out more about Lizzie and her book;

1) Where is your home town?

Leicester, UK. Recently, the remains of King Richard III were located and exhumed in a Leicester City car park after lying there since 1485!!

2) How long have you been writing?

I’ve been scribbling away since childhood. But my latest venture started in 2006 when I left the teaching profession to concentrate on my writing.

 Has is always been romance?

Romance and historical novels, but most recently rom coms, inspired by Jilly Cooper and Helen Fielding (Bridget Jones).

3) Your book cover is lovely and tantalising, who designed it?

I designed it using the Create Space template. My husband spent HOURS sifting through Shutterstock, Dreamstime etc for the right image before I settled on this one (from Dreamstime).

4) With its title, “Tall Dark and Kilted” can only be in Scotland, had you always wanted to set a book here?

I was born in Scotland and love anything to do with its history and romance, so it was a natural choice for me to set my first novel there. My second novel which is due out this autumn is set in Norfolk, England. But I’m returning to Scotland for number three and four.

5) Does our Scottish Laird Ruairi march around in his kilt all day or does it come out on special occasions only?

Ruairi owns several kilts in different versions of the Urquhart tartan – ancient Urquhart, hunting Urquhart and so on. He also has quite a few old kilts which have been ripped on thorns and thistles, mended and consigned to work wear. When estate work demands him to walk through the long grass or when he goes deer stalking he would wear combat pants to protect him from the midges!! Te He!

6) What does he wear under his kilt? (Sorry readers, I just had to ask!)

In true, Scottish fashion he usually goes commando. However, should the occasion warrant it, he would wear Calvin’s beneath his plaid. It the now famous window seat chapter of Tall, Dark and Kilted, the reader learns exactly what the gorgeous Ruairi wears under his kilt.

Old joke: Is there anything worn under your kilt, sir? Answer – No, it’s all in perfect working order. Ha ha!

7) Fliss practices Holistic therapy, did you deliberately want to mix “New” and “Old” in your book?

YES! She leaves behind the raucous lifestyle of Notting Hill and Pimlico and settles for the gentler pace of Kinloch Mara. There she can practice the more ‘yen’ side of holistic therapy, help people relax and unwind – and find out who she really is.

8) You’ve added humour to your book too, can you tell us a little of what to look for that will make us giggle?

Most people have said that they’ve enjoyed the sparky dialogue between Fliss and Ruairi. My favourite moment is when Ruairi’s sisters’ antics on the London Underground are revealed (via a YouTube video). We see them performing a sword dance to Scotland the Brave and then stripping down to thongs and hold up stockings to execute a pole dance to the Pussy Cat Doll’s Don’t You Wish Your Girlfriend Was Hot Like Me? Oh My! That sound pretty memorable!

9) You are a Founder member of The New Romantics 4, can you tell us more about this?

Certainly.

The catalyst for forming the NR4 was an inspiring lunch with a well known indie author (Amanda Grange) who encouraged us to stop waiting for agents to nail a publishing deal and to go it alone. We reached the conclusion we had nothing to fear other than fear itself and set off on the road to self publication summer 2012. Along with three other authors in  The New Romantics 4 (all members of the Romantic Novelists’ Association’s New Writers’ Scheme) I published my debut novel on Amazon as a paperback and kindle download.  Last autumn we held red carpet road shows where we read extracts from our novels over fizz and canapés, and then signed and sold copies of our books. We have plans to repeat this experience again in November 2013 – including one gig in London !! Woo Hoo. I’ll certainly look out for that.

10) What is the new title of your next book? When will it be published?

My second novel is called BOOT CAMP BRIDE and is currently with a copy editor. I expect it to be ready by the end of October 2013 and available on Amazon in November.

Tall Dark and KiltedFind Lizzie’s book here on Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Thank you Lizzie, I’m beginning to feel part of your book already without having read it, it’s characters are enticing me in.