GYRE by @JessGunnAuthor #YA / #NA #SciFic Ancient Atlantis and Lemuria travellers #wwwblogs

Gyre (Atlas Link, #1)Gyre by Jessica Gunn
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Gyre is Young Adult/ New Adult Scifi and book #1 of the Atlas Link series. The book opens in Boston, but most of the action takes place aboard a top secret Navy vessel known as SeaSatellite5.

Chelsea, an archaeology student and rock singer, meets Trevor Bancore one evening. He stops Chelsea being assaulted. Trevor is on the run; for him, there is no escaping a war over time travel, fought between two ancient races.

Three months later Chelsea is confronted by her cheating boyfriend, and her anger unleashes a hidden power within her. She teleports to a top secret naval vessel, where a serious security breach occurs and she is rescued by the intervention of Dr Helen Gordon.

Helen believes Chelsea has an ancient Atlantean gene. However, Chelsea knows nothing of such an ancestry link. Seasatellite5 is currently searching the oceans for ancient artefacts; to keep Chelsea safe and train her, she is offered an internship, helping with the archaeology finds. Chelsea has few choices and is also strongly attracted to Trevor, who works on the vessel, so accepts the post.

The team discover an ancient outpost, but news of the discovery draws interest from others. Trevor has not been totally honest with Chelsea about his own background; when the sub is hijacked by a group of Lemurians, Chelsea discovers just who the enemy is.

As with the start of any series, there is a lot of background information to digest. I enjoyed the theme of Atlantis and the war with Lemuria being documented in history books with connections to lost cities. The association with ancient artefacts becoming travel portals is good, and I can see this leading into the next books in the series.

There is a large cast of characters; I wanted the secondary significant players to be easier to picture, especially for later scenes involving fast action and multiple characters. Currently these were weaker areas of the book, and I found it hardest to picture scenes featuring Lemurian powers.

The scifi fantasy genre allows for creativity of both characters and new worlds. Chelsea is transformed from student to super soldier. Trevor creates and plays computer games like many teenagers, but holds down a top engineering job. I don’t think we’ve seen his real strength yet; in this book he holds much of the storyline together, but has a far lesser role than Chelsea. Were they believable? On the whole I think they were; a few times I would have liked to see their dialogue tightened, and some of the high emotion scenes didn’t work for me. The strength of the book, however, is the possibility of Atlantis and Lemuria being real, and how the author will develop this throughout the series.

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Book Description

Chelsea didn’t try to teleport. All she wanted was to play the Battle of the Bands show. But after accidentally teleporting onto classified Navy vessel SeaSatellite5, all she’s rocking is the boat. 

Once it’s sorted out that Chelsea’s not a threat, SeaSat5’s top scientist offers Chelsea a position on the crew as an archaeology intern. Dr. Gordon studies people with powers, believing them to be descendants of Atlantean refugees, except Chelsea’s powers are beyond anything on previous record. 

While great for everyone else onboard, the miracle of Chelsea is Trevor’s worst nightmare. The same girl who’d given him a brief lifeline to sanity three months ago literally fell from the sky, under a mile of ocean, and onto the very station where he’s employed. Making matters worse, Trevor’s family are Lemurians, Atlantis’s enemy, and Chelsea’s presence is unpredicted—a wrench in an already unstable situation. But Trevor wants no part of his family’s war. The only thing he wants is Chelsea, Atlantean or not. 

Days into Chelsea’s sudden appearance, SeaSatellite5 uncovers Atlantean ruins and a massive artifact cache, placing its entire, hundred-man crew in the crosshairs of an ancient war. There are those who want the Atlantean relics inside the ruins destroyed, and only Trevor knows the treasures for what they really are: Link Pieces, tools used by the ancient civilizations for their time-travel war. 

With lies and shifting alliances abound, Chelsea and Trevor will have to think fast in order to save the station. If they don’t, the Lemurians will seize the artifacts and Atlantis will be destroyed forever.

About the author

Jessica Gunn

Jessica Gunn is a New Adult author and avid science-fiction and fantasy fan. Her favorite stories are those that transport the reader to other, more exciting worlds. When not working or writing, she can be found binge-watching Firefly and Stargate, or feeding her fascination of the ancient world’s many mysteries. Jessica also holds a degree in Anthropology.

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Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT SKYJACKED by Shirley Golden @Shirl1001 @urbanepub #SciFi

Today’s team review is from Lilyn, she blogs at http://www.scifiandscary.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Lilyn has been reading Skyjacked by Shirley Golden

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Skyjacked was a good effort by Shirley Golden.  It was an enjoyable read, but it wasn’t an exciting one. I never got swept up in it. Actually, I felt on a few occasions like I had to force myself to finish it. And that’s not really the reaction this book deserved. But like I said: It was okay. It never thrilled me, but it was competently told. 

I think maybe I was expecting too much. “Motley band” “ultimate adventure”, etc, had me expecting something filled to the bursting with wise-cracking wit, impression-leaving characters, and tons of action. There was a good bit of action, but the only character that really stood out to me as interesting was the robot. It took about 65% of the book (Kindle format) before I became adequately invested enough to care about what was going on. I feel like, at that point, no matter how interesting the rest of it is, it’s just a bit lacking.

I do give Shirley Golden props for fleshing out her story with believable bits of history and side notes. I’m ashamed to admit it took me a little too long to realize the Niaz/Nazi thing. On the other hand, that made it into a delightful surprise when I did see it. Like an Easter Egg hidden in the book.  I also did enjoy how she was able to pull in a few threads I thought were unconnected in ways I wasn’t expecting. I also enjoyed watching one of the characters get what was coming to him and seeing the other come into herself. I can’t say that I bought all of it, but I bought enough.

I was happy with the ending. I do think she did a great job of picking the perfect ending for this book. Most of the time I’m the person who argues against the type of ending Skyjacked had. However (probably partly because it was unexpected), it worked really well for this book. Actually, the ending was the strongest part of the book. If more of the book had been as well-written as that ending was, I’d have been much happier.  I wish I could say more, but I don’t want to spoil anything!

Overall, not a bad book, but not an outstanding one.  Still, I think most sci-fi readers would enjoy it. 

Book Description

Separated from his son, only a galaxy stands between him and home… The year is 2154, and Corvus Ranger, space pilot and captain of the Soliton, embarks on a penal run to Jupiter’s prison moon, Europa. It should be another routine drop, but a motley band of escaped convicts have other ideas. When Soliton is hijacked, Corvus is forced to set a new destination, one which is far from Earth and his son. Unable to fight (or smooth talk) his way to freedom, Corvus finds himself tied to the plans of the escapees, including their leader Isidore and a gifted young boy who seems to possess strange abilities. Desperate to return to Earth and the son he left behind, Corvus is thrown into the ultimate adventure, a star-strewn odyssey where the greatest enemy in the universe may very well be himself.

About the author

Shirley Golden

Shirley Golden has fiction publications in anthologies and magazines. Some of her stories have won prizes, and many have been shortlisted in competitions. She is a novelist who writes historical fiction and fantasy. Her debut novel, ‘Skyjacked’, a space fantasy, will be published by Urbane Publications in the spring of 2016.

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT SERENGETI by @Rockwell_JB #SciFi #WeekendBlogShare

Today’s team review is from Lilyn, she blogs at http://www.scifiandscary.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Lilyn has been reading Serengeti by JB Rockwell

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So, I never thought I’d read a story where the whole first third of it was one massive battle, and walk away saying I liked it. I have a short attention span, so protracted scenes tend to make me wander off. However, the action in J.B. Rockwell’s Serengeti was interesting enough that it kept my attention glued to it. I read it while taking a bubble bath, whilst walking through the house, etc. And when things calmed down (and they do calm way down), I happily kept reading it.

Serengeti is one part pulse-pounding action, two parts Wall-E 2. And, surprisingly, the two completely different types of books work really well together. The first third allows you to garner respect for the AI controlling the ship Serengeti, and to begin thinking of her as a ‘person’. As Serengeti, herself. A being, not a ship. That’s a crucial step to being able to feel for her as the other two-thirds happen.  And you do feel for Serengeti. J.B. Rockwell does a fantastic job of showcasing the AI’s humanity even as she’s doing things that no human could do. The feelings of isolation, and sorrow tug at you again and again. But her sheer determination and loyalty to her crew keep you rooting for her.

There were problems with the book, though. One of the biggest problems I had with Serengeti is that I had trouble believing the AI was that human. It had its moments where it seemed more like an unwitting anthromorphosism than actually believable evolution. That might partially be my mind’s unwillingness to believe that the development of AI can progress that far. However, J.B. Rockwell inserts enough coldly logical thoughts/acts that she mostly keeps pulling it back from being too much for too long. Mostly. There’s a character introduced at one point in the later half of the story that I just cannot buy. It’s a little too much.

It’s hard to review the book as a whole because of how very different the sections are. I will say that J.B. Rockwell wrote one of the best space battles I’ve read in a long time. It was clearly written, easy to visualize, and full of enough deaths and explosions to make my heart go pitter-pat. It’s a lovely book to curl up with, as it gets you revved up and then slowly pulls your emotions back down. Serengeti is one of those books you’ll end up re-reading, just to see if she can invoke the hope and melancholy in you all over again. 

Book Description

It was supposed to be an easy job: find the Dark Star Revolution Starships, destroy them, and go home. But a booby-trapped vessel decimates the Meridian Alliance fleet, leaving Serengeti-a Valkyrie class warship with a sentient AI brain-on her own; wrecked and abandoned in an empty expanse of space. On the edge of total failure, Serengeti thinks only of her crew. She herds the survivors into a lifeboat, intending to sling them into space. But the escape pod sticks in her belly, locking the cryogenically frozen crew inside. Then a scavenger ship arrives to pick Serengeti’s bones clean. Her engines dead, her guns long silenced, Serengeti and her last two robots must find a way to fight the scavengers off and save the crew trapped inside her.

About the author

J.B. Rockwell

J.B. Rockwell is a New Englander, which is important to note because it means she’s (a) hard headed, (b) frequently stubborn, and (c) prone to fits of snarky sarcasticness. As a kid she subsisted on a steady diet of fairy tales, folklore, mythology augmented by generous helpings of science fiction and fantasy. As a quasi-adult she dreamed of being the next Indiana Jones and even pursued (and earned!) a degree in anthropology. Unfortunately, those dreams of being an archaeologist didn’t quite work out. Through a series of twists and turns (involving cats, a marriage, and a SCUBA certification, amongst other things) she ended up working in IT for the U.S. Coast Guard and now writes the types of books she used to read. Not a bad ending for an Indiana Jones wannabe…

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SKYJACKED by Shirley Golden @shirl1001@urbanepub light easy read #SciFi #SundayBlogShare

SkyjackedSkyjacked by Shirley Golden
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Skyjacked is an easy read scifi suitable for a wider reading audience. It begins in 2146 with a young boy undergoing experiments for an energy which he emits, and his ability to “read” others.

The book then continues eight years later. We meet Corvus a spaceship pilot. He is about to take some prisoners to a penal colony on Europa, however once arrived he finds a small coup and he and his spaceship are hijacked. Four ex-prisoners take Corvus and two of those he was transporting and set off for an unknown planet.

Needing fuel, they encounter a planet of A1 Robots and Corvus’ instincts about one of his captors come true. On another planet when searching for water they are waylaid by pollen from mysterious plants. Attempts to reach out for rescue invite dangerous aliens and the action increases when they set off on a rescue mission.

There’s enough action and character relationship developments to keep the pace interesting. The quantity of scifi gizmos and gadgets is enough without it being overwhelming. Overall an enjoyable quick read.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book Description

Separated from his son, only a galaxy stands between him and home… The year is 2154, and Corvus Ranger, space pilot and captain of the Soliton, embarks on a penal run to Jupiter’s prison moon, Europa. It should be another routine drop, but a motley band of escaped convicts have other ideas. When Soliton is hijacked, Corvus is forced to set a new destination, one which is far from Earth and his son. Unable to fight (or smooth talk) his way to freedom, Corvus finds himself tied to the plans of the escapees, including their leader Isidore and a gifted young boy who seems to possess strange abilities. Desperate to return to Earth and the son he left behind, Corvus is thrown into the ultimate adventure, a star-strewn odyssey where the greatest enemy in the universe may very well be himself. 

About the author

Shirley Golden

Shirley Golden has fiction publications in anthologies and magazines. Some of her stories have won prizes, and many have been shortlisted in competitions. She is a novelist who writes historical fiction and fantasy. Her debut novel, ‘Skyjacked’, a space fantasy, will be published by Urbane Publications in the spring of 2016.

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Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT THE FAIR & FOUL by Allie Potts #SciFi #TuesdayBookBlog

Today’s team review is from Noelle, she blogs at, http://saylingaway.wordpress.com

#RBRT Review Team

Noelle has been reading The Fair & Foul by Allie Potts

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Book Review: Fair and Foul by Allie Potts @alliepottswrite #rbrt #sci fi #technological fiction

 

I chose to read Fair and Foul, Project Gene Assist Book 1, for Rosie’s book review team because I was very much attracted by the premise – a brilliant female programmer, Juliane Faris, determined to change the world through technological advancement but blinded by her ambition to create a legacy by participating in highly risky and uncontrolled experimentation. The procedure to which she willingly submits grants her unprecedented knowledge and control over her mind, it at will to the internet, making her brain a supercomputer. This is not without side effects which threaten her very sanity. It’s clear from the premise that the author has a real gift for seeing and imagining future technology.

The testy relationship at the outset between Juliane and her mentor, Alan (couldn’t find a last name), a superstar scientist, is all too real – he takes advantage of her work without giving her credit. She has guts and does stand up to him. She and Alan both work for ACI, a private-public partnership think tank devoted to research and development, established by Louis Evans, Sr. When Juliane meets Louis, Jr., reportedly a playboy with no interest in his father’s creation, she quickly finds he is neither dumb or disinterested. He has a quick mind and is determined to take ACI to even greater heights of discovery. When Juliane falls for Louis and engages in an affair, she thinks her future is rosy. But there are two caveats a scientist should always remember: don’t antagonize your mentor and don’t date the boss’s son!

I found Alan’s character two dimensional – loathsome, self-centered, egotistical – and some of the other characters weren’t much better. Juliane’s research assistant was the exception. Chad was delightfully and humorously all too human and I wish he hadn’t disappeared half way through the book.

I am not the most tech-gifted reader, but there were parts of this book that had me confused. It was especially frustrating when some of the descriptions of the laboratory work did not ring true, even for a computer lab. I spent several decades running my own lab, so more background work in running a research operation might have grounded the story to a better degree. The science itself is occasionally confusing, and experimenting on oneself – and without controls – is such a negative for me that I had to make an effort to suspend belief. But that’s what one does with science fiction.

There are editing gaps – an explosion that apparently occurs in Juliane’s lab to which there is a reference but no description, before the explosion in the foreign factory producing one of Juliane’s products. Color me confused.

I suspect there are a lots of sci fi fans out there who will dig into this book with great enjoyment, and Ms. Potts has received some strongly positive reviews. While there were parts of Fair and Foul I found interesting and compelling, it was a difficult read for me personally.

Book Description

Juliane has a supercomputer for a brain and she isn’t afraid to use it. Perhaps she should be.

Juliane Faris is a brilliant programmer determined to change the world through scientific and technical advancement. Blinded by ambition, she will do whatever it takes to secure her legacy including agreeing to participate in an experimental procedure. The procedure grants her unprecedented knowledge and cellular control over her body but threatens everything she holds dear including her sanity. When others undergo the same modifications it becomes apparent that not everyone can afford the price that this technology demands

Set in the not too distant future, The Fair & Foul is earth-based science fiction dealing with the next era of human evolution. The line between humanity and technology is blurring, and what seems like magic is only a scientific discovery away. 

About the author

Allie Potts

Allie Potts, born in Rochester Minnesota was moved to North Carolina at a very early age by parents eager to escape to a more forgiving climate. She has since continued to call North Carolina home, settling in Raleigh, halfway between the mountains and the sea, in 1998.

When not finding ways to squeeze in 72 hours into a 24 day or chasing after children determined to turn her hair gray before its time, Allie enjoys stories of all kinds. Her favorites, whether they are novels, film, or simply shared aloud with friends, are usually accompanied with a glass of wine or cup of coffee in hand.

A self-professed science geek and book nerd, Allie also writes at www.alliepottswrites.com.

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT HELL HOLES by Donald Firesmith @DonFiresmith #SciFi #Paranormal

Today’s team review is from Olga, she blogs at http://www.authortranslatorolga.com

#RBRT Review Team

Olga has been reading Hell Holes by Donald Firesmith

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Hell Holes: What Lurks Below (Volume 1) by Donald Firesmith Science,horror, fantasy, paranormal

I received a free ARC copy of the book and I voluntarily decided to review it. I am also sharing this review as part of Rosie’s Book Review Team.

Hell Holes is an intriguing book and one difficult to classify. Set in Alaska, the prologue already gives us a hint about what is to come, but once we start reading the account written by Professor Jack Oswald, we get taken in by the mystery of the holes, and by the hypotheses suggested, sending us in the direction of science-fiction. The explanations and the possible scenarios are plausibly rendered and the fact that Oswald’s wife, Angie, studies the effect of climate change, add to the interest.

The plot turns soon when the holes prove to be dangerous in more ways than one, and paranormal and fantastic elements become more important as the plot moves on. There are also horror elements, like the monsters and the destruction and killings, and we do get more than a few hair-raising moments.

As often happens with some of these genres, there is a fair amount of exposition, regarding the set-up of the different pump stations and oil fields, and later about the supernatural elements (as one of the characters is revealed to be completely different to what we thought at first sight). As there is a description of the different Hell inhabitants later on after the end of the story, it does feel somewhat repetitive.

The book is also very short, even more than it looks like when we check the pages, as the end comes at around 80% of the book length, and the rest is taken by a summary/description, a cast of hell characters, a brief biography of the author and a longish sample of the next book, that follows (with a slight overlap) from the first one. From the sample, we see that the second book in the series is narrated by Professor Oswald’s wife.

The novel (novella) is plot-driven, and once the chase is on, the book moves quickly and never lets off, and we don’t have much chance to notice that we do not know the characters in detail, and there is plenty of room for development, although one suspects the action will continue taking pride of place in the next novels.

There are series where it doesn’t matter where you start reading (or it might matter, but it’s possible to read any novel and enjoy it in its own right without feeling you’re missing the context). This is not the case here, as although the story seems to be told from different points of view in the different books, it is all the same story. And in case you hate cliff-hangers, the book ends up in a worrying twist/hook. But, fear not, because if you read the sample of the next book at the end, at least that hook is solved.

The book is an easy and quick read and an action-filled one that you’ll imagine as a TV series or a movie with no difficulty. If you’re a stickler for specific genres and strong characters it might not suit you, and you might question some of the details, but if you’re looking for an entertaining read that moves easily between genres, and don’t mind investing in a series, give it a try.

Book Description

A geologist, his climatologist wife, two graduate students, a local newspaper reporter, an oil company representative, and a field biologist travel to one of dozens of huge holes that have mysteriously appeared in the tundra of the North Slope of Alaska. Their mission is to research these strange craters that threaten financial and environmental catastrophe should they open up under the Trans-Alaska Pipeline or any of the many oil wells and smaller pipelines that feed it. Unfortunately, a far worse danger lurks below, one that threatens to destroy all of humanity when it emerges. Who will survive the demonic invasion to flee south towards the safety of Fairbanks?

About the author

Donald G. Firesmith

A geek by day, Donald Firesmith works as a system and software engineer helping the US Government acquire large, complex software-intensive systems. In this guise, he has authored seven technical books, written numerous software- and system-related articles and papers, and spoken at more conferences than he can possibly remember. He’s also proud to have been named a Distinguished Engineer by the Association of Computing Machinery, although his pride is tempered somewhat by his fear that the term “distinguished” makes him sound like a graybeard academic rather than an active engineer whose beard is still slightly more red than gray.

By night and on weekends, his alter ego writes modern paranormal fantasy, apocalyptic science fiction, action and adventure novels and relaxes by handcrafting magic wands from various magical woods and mystical gemstones. His first foray into fiction is the book Magical Wands: A Cornucopia of Wand Lore written under the pen name Wolfrick Ignatius Feuerschmied. He lives in Crafton, Pennsylvania with his wife Becky, and his son Dane, and varying numbers of dogs, cats, and birds.

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The Visitor by Tony Harmsworth #SciFi #Bookreview

The Visitor  by Tony Harmsworth
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Three point Five stars

The Visitor is a SciFi tale and begins in 2025 with astronaut Evelyn Slater heading up in a Soyuz shuttle to the International Space Station which orbits Earth. Her role will be to investigate space debris using a ship called a Scaffy Wagon. Much of the debris will be parts of broken spaceships which she can nudge into the gravitational pull of earth and they will burn up upon entry into the atmosphere.

However they soon discover that one item is like nothing they’ve seen before. A broken piece of Alien technology. A research lab is built to study the item and Evelyn finds herself heading up the secret mission.

Forced to return to Earth, Evelyn is given a job as Director at Goonhilly in Cornwall, she heads up a team of specialists, who try to solve the mystery of the alien object and learn all they can from it. Two new developments throw Evelyn into the public limelight, firstly a second alien object and the decision by world leaders to make the discoveries public knowledge.

Emotions about the project run high and Evelyn is endangered and left in a coma. The second alien object is intact and teams of scientists work round the clock to interact with it. How will the people of Earth respond when the Alien comes down to Earth for a visit?

There is a really good storyline in here, the descriptions about space are fascinating, some very in-depth, and I liked the idea of fully robotic cars on our roads. It needs a bit more work in some areas; where there are some character and information dumps and sometimes the amount of dialogue slows the pace of the story, the use of another edit would take this book to the next level.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT THE FAIR & FOUL by @alliepottswrite #SciFi #Fantasy #fridayreads

Today’s Team Review is from Teri, she blogs here http://teripolen.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Teri has been reading The Fair & Foul by Allie Potts

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Juliane has a supercomputer for a brain and she isn’t afraid to use it. Perhaps she should be.

Juliane Faris is a brilliant programmer determined to change the world through scientific and technical advancement. Blinded by ambition, she will do whatever it takes to secure her legacy including agreeing to participate in an experimental procedure. The procedure grants her unprecedented knowledge and cellular control over her body but threatens everything she holds dear including her sanity. When others undergo the same modifications it becomes apparent that not everyone can afford the price that this technology demands

Set in the not too distant future, The Fair & Foul is earth-based science fiction dealing with the next era of human evolution. The line between humanity and technology is blurring, and what seems like magic is only a scientific discovery away.

My Review:  I’m such a groupie for books involving any kind of genetic manipulation – the scientific aspects fascinate me.  If you read the description above, you can see why this one grabbed my attention.

In this novel, there are characters seeking scientific and technical advancements for the right reasons, and those who are only looking out for themselves – which provide some compelling and interesting conflicts.  As a woman, Juliane deals with her share of struggles and roadblocks, but her determination to succeed in her field is admirable.  The author does a wonderful job of making the reader feel as frustrated and confused as Juliane over certain plot developments.  The supporting characters are varying degrees of likable and loathsome and although I was convinced I knew who was trustworthy and who had ulterior motives, I was proven wrong.  It’s nice when that happens.

Juliane is a strong, ambitious woman, so it’s disappointing when an attractive guy shows up and she seems to lose focus – but I’m not a fan of romance novels, so that’s a personal preference on my part.  At times, the dialogue is somewhat stilted, and the addition of contractions would make conversations sound more natural.

The ending just blew me away and is a perfect launching pad for book two in this series.  If you’re a fan of though-provoking sci-fi, this is your book.

I received a copy of this book through Rosie’s Book Review Team in exchange for an honest review.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT THE DEAD CITY by @dylanjmorgan #SciFi #wwwblogs

Today’s team review is from Cathy, she blogs at http://betweenthelinesbookblog.wordpress.com/

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Cathy has been reading The Dead City by Dylan J Morgan

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Several weeks after the first contingent of soldiers were despatched to Hemera on an ill-fated reconnaissance mission (The Dead Lands), another larger, elite force has travelled from Erebus to Hemera in order to rescue any survivors. Headed by Colonel Paden who couldn’t really care less about his soldiers, and has his sights firmly set on the treasure he believes is buried beneath the presidential palace. The Superior Armed Forces are aware from previous reports that Hemera’s capital, Magna, is overrun by mutants but were unprepared for the magnitude of their task and the swarms of creatures which greeted their disembarkation.

The action is non stop from that moment with terrifying battle scenes and lots of carnage on both sides. Written in the third person, it gives excellent, and sometimes poignant, insights into the characters, as we get to know the dynamics and great mix of personalities and motivations. They all inspire strong emotions and are crafted exceptionally well – those you love and those you love to hate. My favourites are Ryan and his sister, Jayde, along with several others. I know it’s a mistake to get too attached (it took me a while to get over Lane) as Dylan Morgan has no scruples about killing off characters, good as well as bad.

There are so many motivating forces in this story, including hate, greed, love, fear, honour and principles relating to loyalty and conduct. I know from reading previous books there is never a happy ever after, but this finishes with a completely unexpected and terrifically awful twist at the end, which I hope means the story isn’t over just yet, although I think I’ve visualised enough body parts and gore flying around to keep me going for a little while😉

The writing is as descriptive and detailed as always, with well defined characters, and a fast paced plot. If I can use the three Gs again – gritty, gruesome and great! Those words do seem to encapsulate Dylan Morgan’s books.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com available free from Kindle Unlimited

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT THE DEAD CITY by @dylanjmorgan #SciFi #SundayBlogShare

Today’s team review is from Teri, she blogs at http://teripolen.com/

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Teri has been reading The Dead City by Dylan J Morgan

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I’ve been anticipating this followup to The Dead Lands (review here) and was highly rewarded for my impatience patience.

The reader is immediately dropped into a riveting action sequence that will make you want to flip ahead to see what happens – but try to resist the urge!  The action sequences are vivid and extremely well done and I could easily picture the scenes as if watching a movie.

Morgan also possesses a talent at creating characters you love and those you love to hate and would like to feed to the mutants yourself – namely the greedy, narcissistic, and disgusting Colonel Paden.  That being said, one of the reasons Morgan’s books are so suspenseful is that you never know if one of your favorite characters will live or go down in a blaze of glory –  or even with a whimper.  But it sure does make for an exciting read.

And the ending!  Just when I thought the story was over, my heart rate had returned to normal, and I’d made peace with the sacrifices and deaths, a curveball came out of nowhere and left me in shock.  A dark, but nice twist that could lead to a sequel – I hope.

I received a copy of this book through Rosie’s Book Review Team in exchange for an honest review.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com