Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT IREX by @CarlRackman Victorian Seafaring HistFic #Thriller

Today’s team review is from Noelle, she blogs here http://saylingaway.wordpress.com

#RBRT Review Team

Noelle has been reading Irex by Carl Rackman

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Book Review: #Victorian historical mystery #psychological thriller #seafaring tale

 Irex is Carl Rackman’s debut novel, and in terms of creating a feeling of doom and tension in totally bleak surroundings, this author succeeds too well!

Set in the late Victorian era, the story alternates between the maiden voyage of the steel hulled, tall ship Irex, and the investigation into the causes of its wreck and the fate of the survivors amongst her passengers. The settings: The Firth of Clyde, the North Atlantic and the Isle of Wight – all in late winter with unceasing rain, snow and sleet.

Will Hutton, a good and decent married man, has been chosen to captain Irex on this voyage, the ship carrying a cargo of three thousand tons of pig iron to Rio de Janeiro. Hutton has decades of sailing experience, having served on such ships since he was a boy. In addition to the cargo, there are three passengers on Irex: Salvation Army missionaries George and Elizabeth Barstow and a mysterious man of means, Edward Clarence. Captain Hutton’s developing relationships with each of these passengers is a complex subplot, more so when he discovers that one of them hides a horrifying past and none of them are who they seem. The unending storms preventing Irex from making headway on her journey and an early death of a crew member foretells an ill-fated voyage. Lack of sleep, his physical attraction to Mrs. Barstow, challenges to his authority and blackmail all threaten Hutton’s ability to save his ship and challenge his sanity.

Irex wrecks off the Isle of Wight six weeks after sailing from Scotland, and a county coroner, Frederick Blake, is sent to the island to hold an inquiry into the cause. The inquiry is compromised from the start by the existence of a mole within the procedure, and with a disturbing lack of information and witnesses, Blake finds he himself must unravel the events dooming the ship, as well as the character of the crew and its passengers, to reach a finding. When he discovers that powerful forces within the British aristocracy are working to impede his investigation, he is more determined than ever to find out what actually occurred aboard Irex.

The atmosphere of this mystery is exceptional and the author’s attention to detail, especially in the chapters dealing with the voyage and the sailing of such a large ship, show an incredible depth of research. The ship, its crew, and their responsibilities are finely delineated – as a sailor myself, I appreciated the descriptions.

The author has created a rich Victorian world and spun the tail with colourful, unforgettable characters, weaving in intrigue and mystery. When the truth about Clarence is revealed, the plot unveils a deeper depravity – for me a light bulb moment.

My only complaint is the slow pace at which the plot unfolds. The book is dense, very dense, and there were stretches that could have been shortened significantly without affecting the content. I truly wanted to digest it all but wanted more to get to the resolution!

Mr. Rackman is an exceptional writer and this is a superb first outing – a psychological thriller, a seafaring adventure, and first rate murder mystery. I look forward to his next book.

Book Description

In the harsh winter of December 1889, the sailing vessel Irex leaves Scotland bound for Rio de Janeiro. She carries three thousand tons of pig iron and just three passengers for what should be a routine voyage. But Captain Will Hutton discovers that one of his passengers hides a horrifying secret. 

When the Irex is wrecked off the Isle of Wight six weeks later, it falls to the county coroner, Frederick Blake, to begin to unravel the events that overtook the doomed ship — but he soon finds that powerful forces within the British Establishment are working to thwart him. Locked in a race against time and the sinister agents sent to impede him, he gradually discovers that nothing aboard the Irex is what it first seemed… 

Irex is an atmospheric mystery, set in a rich Victorian world, packed with intrigue, twists and colourful characters — the spellbinding first novel by Carl Rackman.

About the author

Carl Rackman

Carl Rackman is a former airline pilot with interests in seafaring and mysteries. His reading is multi-genre – historical, sci-fi, fantasy and techno – but psychological thrillers are prime. He started writing in 2016 and Irex is his first novel. He lives in Surrey, UK.

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#NewRelease ONE LITTLE MISTAKE by @emmacurtisbooks @RosieMargesson #Thriller #SundayBlogShare

One Little MistakeOne Little Mistake by Emma Curtis
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

One Little Mistake is a psychological thriller. The main setting is the London area, the year 2010. Running alongside is another story, set in 1992, which ties in at the end. The book chapters alternate between the two.

The story opens with baby Josh having a morning nap, the third child of Vicky Seagrave. Sleepless nights and a fractious baby leave her strung out, so she’s vulnerable when little distractions occur.
A moment of a poor decision, a break-in and the quick action of her friend leads Vicky down a path of destiny she would not have chosen in hindsight. Vicky and Amber met at anti-natal classes; they’ve become best friends, but the friendships is not without problems, mostly based around Amber’s complex emotional issues.

In the second storyline, Katya was in the care of social services, but her social worker, Maggie didn’t listen when she tried to tell her that Luke was abusing her.

When one lie leads to another Vicky’s life begins to spiral out of control. Others have seen something in Amber they don’t quite trust, but Vicky has been blinded by their friendship. Can she turn things around and keep control? Or will one tiny error be her downfall?

I thought the author portrayed really well the stress new mothers feel when they have demanding babies who don’t sleep at night, and when they also feel they have to cope with social pressure to do everything ‘right’. The story was well developed, with small cracks in the relationship between Vicky and Amber slowly drip-fed to the reader. The pull of a thriller or a mystery, for the reader, is to try to solve the mystery themselves, and this gave a satisfying balance between mystery and clues.

The building of Amber’s character was stealthy, taking her full circle from devoted best pal to jealous friend, and, finally, to shocking stranger. Revelations about her past were a great surprise, and gave another, fascinating angle to the reader’s understanding of her.

Closing messages from the book will have readers thinking about the friendships they currently have and perhaps some they’ve lost on the way, and made me think about how little we know, sometimes, about those we consider friends. The playground gossips at the school of Vicky’s older children had me nodding in recognition, as they will with most mothers.

A good, well-written debut novel. In order to give this book 5* I would have needed to see some really unexpected twists of the jaw-dropping kind to keep the reader on the edge of their seat in this popular genre, but I was impressed with what I read.

A thriller to pull at the heartstrings of mothers, and, perhaps, to make others question their closest friendships.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book Description

Vicky Seagrave is blessed: three beautiful children, a successful, doting husband, great friends and a job she loves. She should be perfectly happy.

When she risks everything she holds dear on a whim, there’s only person she trusts enough to turn to.

But Vicky is about to learn that one mistake is all it takes; that if you’re careless with those you love, you don’t deserve to keep them . . . 

About the author

Emma Curtis

Emma Curtis was born in Brighton and brought up in London. Her fascination with the darker side of domestic life inspired her to write One Little Mistake, her first psychological suspense. She has two children and lives in Richmond with her husband.

Goodreads | AmazonUK | AmazonUS | Twitter

ALONE TRILOGY by @BobSummer5 #Psychological #Thrillers set in #Wales #TuesdayBookBlog

ALONE (The complete trilogy)ALONE by Bob Summer
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Alone Trilogy are a set of psychological thrillers set in Wales around a small town of Nanteang. Book #1 Alone But Not Lost introduces us to a lonely a very insecure character called Sin. She lives in a house with top security, CCTV cameras, locks and bolts and a safe room, and hovers on the edge of sanity. Her only human contact is with Hawk, an odd-job man she leaves notes for who gets her shopping and tries to become her friend.

News of the release from prison of Glyn Morgan has Sin panicking, and making preparations to run away. This triggers memories from her childhood and fills us in on the story so far. Born to a mother made rich from a song her band once made, Sin is her mother’s mistake and she’s subjected to verbal and physical abuse from a mentally unstable parent. Forced to live in a pit beneath the garage. Later they send Sin to a private school, where she meets Jenna, but it’s a front for a Paedophile ring and the girls run away, successfully at first, but later they’re caught. With no proper schooling or upbringing, Sin is far from streetwise and experiences then and later, when they return to her mother’s house make her insanity no surprise.

Book #2 The Edge. Grown up Sin is on the run. Jenna’s gone, Hawk’s dead and she can’t trust anyone. This book is also more about police officer Sara Jones, who came as a community support policewoman to offer support when Glyn was freed. Sara and Sin had met about twenty years before when Sin and Jenna were on the run. They both have mental health issues, and are alone. Sara is ostracized at work over supporting a rape allegation against a fellow police officer. She’d like to be a part of the current murder investigation, but she has family connections and they keep her out. But she can’t let it rest and follows her own line of inquiries which lead them to Sin.

Book #3 Detective Alan Meadows is also a loner, sent in undercover to sniff out the corruption in the police-force. There’s been a big fall-out because of Sara’s investigations and she’s left the force for a peaceful life, but two cases of arson at Hawk’s properties and kidnapping of her son and his pregnant girlfriend have her back on the case. With few avenues open to her, she asks Alan for help, the kidnappers want Sin because they believe she holds vital information, but Sin is in a top mental hospital. Sarah will stop at nothing to save her family and Alan puts his job on the line to help her.

It was good to read these books one after another, there was just enough detail of the story so far, for readers who will read them singularly, but not too much for those reading them in sequence. I think they work best read one after the other and I enjoyed the level of suspense in each book. As the books evolve they move more into police crime thrillers. There were some good twists at the end of book three which I didn’t see coming. I would recommend these to anyone who enjoys good thrillers.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT WINGS OF MAYHEM by @SueColetta1 #Thriller #WeekendBlogShare

Today’s second team review is from Karen, she blogs at http://mytrainofthoughtson.wordpress.com

#RBRT Review Team

Karen has been reading Wings Of Mayhem by Sue Coletta

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My Opinion

This book introduces you to Shawnee Daniels, leading a double life and – being immune to feedback is suboptimal when a serial killer is near.

With The Wings of Mayhem, Sue Coletta has once again created an incredibly chilling thriller with a stubborn young woman stalked by a serial killer. It is a very compelling read, inevitably drawing you in as the story proceeds. Sue Coletta paints a clear picture of the main characters’ mindsets – making the readers acquainted with them – while the story evolves. I was drawn rather close to Shawnee (despite her stubbornness) and Levaughn. The characters are very complex, believable with their flaws and virtues; sometimes too believable for comfort. The story is cleverly elaborated and has a great flow. Sue Coletta’s thorough research shows; you find proof throughout the story

This is a book for you if you like psychological suspense, thrillers with serial killers, stubborn characters, and if you are a fan of excellently researched topics.

Highly recommended!

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT CURRENTS OF SIN by @aallemanwrites #Thriller #LasVegas

Today’s second team review is from Judith, she blogs here http://judithbarrowblog.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Judith has been reading Currents of Sin by Arleen Alleman

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My Review:

I was drawn to the cover of this book; it intrigued me and, together with the blurb, I was looking forward to the read.

The subject matter is dark; human trafficking, teenage runaways, enforced prostitution. It’s hard to read because of the themes and because of the depth and intensity of the writing. Which is to be admired. It is obvious that the author has researched extensively and she brings all that knowledge to the story..

The depictions of the settings and the atmosphere they evoke are strong, well described, well detailed. Las Vegas is revealed to have an underbelly of corruption and danger.

The characters are well drawn, especially the protagonist, Darcy. The reader learns a lot of the background, her family, her previous life, former encounters, her friends and her enemies. The portrayal of the abduction of Pamela, Darcy’s adopted daughter, the way she is conditioned into prostitution is written with confidence. I had no difficulty believing the hopelessness of the situation. I know though, I should have read at least one of the former books to have been able gained more empathy with this character.

The plot is complex and interwoven with the history of all the characters’ lives and the multifaceted subplots they bring to the story.

But reading Currents of Sin reminded me how difficult it is to write a book that is a sequel, or a follow on to a series of books. The danger of telling rather than showing- or of information dumping – is difficult to overcome.  I found myself having to read and re-read certain parts to understand how the characters fitted in. Some of the explanations – although necessary in the main to bring an awareness to the situation – slowed the action considerably. I was constantly drawn away from the plot to appreciate and realize where and how, characters and situations were connected.

Yet, as I always say, this could be me and the way that I read. After writing this review I looked for the book on Amazon to find an image of the cover (which still think is brilliant, by the way). There were many good comments on other reviews. There were quite a few five stars. Whenever I see this I start to doubt myself as a reviewer. So I spent a few more hours re-reading. It did become easier but I still don’t think Currents of Sin could be read as a stand alone; there are too many referrals to the plots of the former novels for me.

But if read as a final book in a series I can see that all the threads would be pulled together. It is a good psychological thriller.

Buying links:

Amazon.co.uk:http://amzn.to/2bsg0Ig

Amazon.com: http://amzn.to/2c0M8AI

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT BEDSIT THREE by @sallyjenkinsuk #Thriller #fridayreads

Today’s second team review is from Judith, she blogs at http://judithbarrowblog.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Judith has been reading Bedsit Three by Sally Jenkins

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My Review:

I really enjoyed this novel, it’s a good psychological thriller that steadily builds in tension until the end.

Sally Jenkins’ style of writing is easy to read without being cosy. Her words take the reader steadily through the plot without revealing too much, yet there is also subtle foreshadowing. .

The main characters are well portrayed: the single mother, Sandra, with a young daughter, the new occupant of bedsit three, Ian, a middle class, unemployed man, separated from his wife and son, desperate to be reunited with them. And then there is the former resident of bedsit three;  the mentally disturbed  Ignatius Smith, evicted and living nearby in his car. The author gradually reveals the actions and thought processes of each of these people. And  I liked how the two”off the scene” characters associated with  Ignatius Smith were revealed.. And, no, I won’t say any more about that!

My only disappointment in the whole of this book was with the dialogue. Sometimes, with all of the characters, I thought the dialogue was stilted (perhaps a little contrived?) and didn’t fit their portrayed personalities. Every now a then a section of speech felt as though it was there, not so much for exposition, but for explanation to the reader. Hmm, does that make sense? .

The main setting is Vesey Villas, an old house separated into cramped bedsits. The descriptions of the building are evocative and gives a good sense of place; of seedy, uncared-for rooms. In fact each setting that the characters move around in is well depicted

Bedsit Three has a good, progressive plot, the story is equally shared between the three main characters and was gripping enough to  keep me reading almost in one session. Personally I was a little disappointed with the ending. But this wasn’t because of the writing or the way the plot evolved; it was because I wanted a different ending. I need to stress this was purely personal and gives credit to the writing of Sally Jenkins. So ignore what I’ve just written. You could always find out what I mean by buying this great book.

Bedsit Three is for anyone who enjoys a well written contemporary  psychological thriller.

Buying links:

Amazon.co.uk: http://amzn.to/2bOZQYY

Amazon.com: http://amzn.to/2c5OrG4

Rosie’s Book Review Team #RBRT Childhunt by @FaithMortimer #Mystery #Suspense

Today’s team review comes from Judith, she blogs at http://judithbarrowblog.com/

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Judith chose to read and review Childhunt by Faith Mortimer

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The plot of CHILDHUNT is an excellent one. I admire Faith Mortimer’s writing. I didn’t realise this was a follow on of the Diana Rivers, Psychological Thriller Series and that some of the characters had a past life in earlier books. This coloured my first reaction when reading of this novel and I needed to give it a second go.

I know how difficult it is to avoid information dumps in sequels. This is one reason, I think, that the story is slow in starting. The early chapters mainly consist of setting the characters and their back-story within the scene. We are first introduced to Adam (a detective), Roger (a retired barrister’s clerk). Diana, the obvious protagonist of the book, and ex-fiancée to Adam is only mentioned in a conversation between the two men about a past crime; the killing of two children. She is brought into the story shortly afterwards as a writer, now married to Steve. And it is through her we meet two of the important characters, Debbie and William; parents of Charlie and Hannah.

There are some thrilling action scenes but these are often slowed right down by long pieces of internal dialogue of the characters, especially the character of Debbie (ostensibly the person thought to be involved in the crime discussed earlier) And there are various times when the point of view changes within the narrative without warning, mid-scene, which slows the story yet again.

I don’t give spoilers in reviews so that’s as far as I’ll go.

The dialogue is good and differentiates the characters but the dialogue of the children didn’t ring true for me. Even being willing to believe they are exceedingly well behaved, Charlie’s voice sounded stilted and that of the little girl, Hannah, irritated, purely because it was written exactly as anyone with a lisp would speak. The odd syllable to show that she stutters is all that is required – you need to trust that the reader understands.

The setting is Cyprus, the descriptions of the customs of the country are interesting, there are some wonderful descriptions of the unusual wintry conditions and the descriptions of the buildings are good, especially that of the rented house of the paedophile.

Paedophilia is obviously a difficult subject to write about and Faith Mortimer’s description of the physical appearance of Philip Bolton, the paedophile, is good (although palpably, and quite rightly) written to repulse) and, straight-away, the reader is made aware that there is a sordid mystery to his past. But I found the internal dialogue of the paedophile particularly uncomfortable; not only because of his thoughts but because of the way it was written. For example, “he grinned, lasciviously, thinking how pleasant and delightful touching them would be…”, when he realises his plan is working he felt a “…tingle with excitement in his groin and he let out a cackle of laughter…” and, when he touched the little girl, “The feeling made him groan with desire.” Ms Mortimer makes a good job of making the man repugnant but there was something about the delineation of the scenes that Bolton is in that feels melodramatic and wrong. But, as always, this is only my subjective view.

This is a well-plotted psychological thriller, written from a third person omniscient narrator’s point of view. There are enough clues drip-fed into the story to keep the reader interested (I guessed the real identity of Philip Bolton about halfway through the book – which was quite satisfying). And as I said at the beginning of this review there is much I admire about Faith Mortimer’s writing.

But I probably would have preferred an earlier book about amateur sleuth, Diana Rivers – if only to get to know the background of the characters (but probably because the subject matter of the crime was totally abhorrent.) I know these crimes are a fact of life; I was a child, living at the time of the Moors murders, in a village near to where the children were buried, and remember it far too well.

However, disregarding that, and purely on the basis of reviewing the novel, I have thought carefully about CHILDHUNT and, after much consideration, have given the book three stars.

Find a copy here:

http://amzn.to/1Fqp6y4

http://amzn.to/1A4dryJ

Rosie’s Book Review Team #RBRT Terry reviews Behind A Twisted Smile by Faith Mortimer

Today we have a review from Terry, she blogs at http://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

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Terry chose to read and review Behind A Twisted Smile by Faith Mortimer

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Behind a Twisted Smile by Faith Mortimer

3.5 stars

Reviewed by me as part of Rosie Amber’s Review Team

A psychological thriller. Keen marathon runner Moya Waterford has had a brief relationship with Martyn Cousins, and thinks she will hear no more from him when she calls it a day. This, however, is when the trouble starts, as he insinuates himself into the life of her family and manages to convince everyone that he is a really nice guy. Moya suspects differently, especially when she finds out details about his past. Alas, no-one believes her….

This is a fairly standard plot, but it’s in the telling, right? I sped through the first fifty per cent of the book on a long train journey without even noticing I had read so much of it; I found the writing style very readable, and there were no long boring bits or diversions that might have tempted me to skip read. Martyn was delightfully slimy, sister Evie and mother Belinda irritating in their naiveté; the dialogue is mostly smooth and the book starts with a good punch.

I’m in two minds about this one; one the one hand I did enjoy it, but on the other hand I felt frustrated by it because the whole premise by which the plot hangs is, I think, unfeasible. Very slight spoiler alert here; skip to the next paragraph if you don’t want to know anything at all about the plot. Right from the beginning Martyn gives Moya’s friends and family the impression that he dumped her and she is upset and jealous because he is now with her sister, Evie. So why doesn’t Moya make clear that it is she who finished it and she doesn’t even like him much? She’s supposed to be a strong, outspoken sort of woman but for some reason is struck dumb about this detail until much later. Next, someone from Martyn’s past travels hundreds of miles to reveal shocking details about her own experience with him, and to warn Moya that he is dangerous, but for some reason Moya does little about it, and doesn’t even seem to give it more than a cursory consideration although the pattern is clearly repeating itself. When she does finally start to reveal details, her lifelong best friend chooses to believe Martyn over her, despite all the evidence.

I liked Faith Mortimer’s writing style and would read another book by her; if you are good at suspending disbelief this might work for you (as I can see by the reviews it has for many), but for me it needed more thinking out, perhaps another draft or two to tighten up the prose, and less inclusion of unlikely occurrences in order to push the plot forward. I was expecting much more of a twist in the tale all the way through, and suspected another character’s involvement in the evil-doing; I thought I’d been really clever and guessed it at 57% but I was wrong; a really great twist at the end would have made the book so much stronger.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Rosie’s Book Review Team #RBRT Babus reviews Just Two Weeks by Amanda Sington-Williams

Today’s review comes from Babus, she blogs here, http://ajoobacatsblog.wordpress.com

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Babus chose to read and review Just Two Weeks in conjunction with Brook Cottage Books

Just Two Weeks by Amanda Sington-Williams

Just Two Weeks by Amanda Sington-Williams

Review

This chilling story starts with Jo meeting a fellow tourist over breakfast at her hotel in Sri Lanka, but the terrifying events that follow escalate, leaving Jo fearful for her life and the reader unnerved at the edge of their seat.

Jo’s fear, frustration and sheer desperation is palpable throughout this psychological thriller as she doubts every relationship she has. The way her stalker keeps tabs on her and implicates herself into her life gave me chills. The suspense in this book is well-written and the premise that what happens to Jo could happen to anyone lends fear factor.

A totally gripping, but chilling read.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

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Just Two Weeks by Amanda Sington-Williams

Just Two WeeksJust Two Weeks by Amanda Sington-Williams

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Just Two Weeks is a psychological Suspense. Jolene Carr is holidaying alone at the Green Spa Hotel in Sri Lanka. A last minute decision by partner Mark, who needed to stay home and look after his terminally ill father meant Jo took off on her own. She needed this break, she’d just been made redundant and she had an old leg injury which would benefit from the warm sun and massages in the hotel spa.

At her first breakfast she is befriended by another lone traveller, they chat and Zara invites Jo to spend the day with her at another beach. Instructed to bring her passport and money with her for safety, Jo falls foul of an easy con and is left high, dry and robbed. This is just the beginning of a set of harrowing events, where locals clam up, authorities are suspicious and Jo is left frightened, exhausted and vulnerable.

A victim of several more holiday incidents which you read about in the papers, Jo believes that she keeps seeing Zara/Raquel or whatever this con woman’s name is. Returning home Jo goes to put it all behind her until Raquel starts stalking her. With everyone around telling her she’s imagining things and jumping to the wrong conclusions, Jo’s life spirals out of control. She discovers more alias for this woman as the net closes in.

This book definitely left me having an uneasy sleep once I’d finished it late at night, but I’m not a hard core psychological suspense reader. I wanted to shout at Jo more than once at her ability to not act safely, easy for me to judge whilst sitting in the warm safety of my home.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

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After being made redundant from a seemingly secure job Jolene Carr takes a two week break in the sun. On the first day she meets Raquel, another hotel guest. Little does she realise how this apparently innocent acquaintance will lead to terrible and lasting consequences. After a frightening incident she hits a conspiracy of silence from the locals and over the rest of the holiday she feels herself slipping into a vortex of fear. Back home, the nightmare continues and she realises that Raquel is stalking her. Her hippie mother and her partner Mark tell her she is imagining it all. All certainties, even about relationships, become fluid and treacherous as her past begins to unravel. If it wasn’t for Rob, her ex-lover who Jolene thinks has his own agenda, she would be left to cope on her own.
How much fear and betrayal can one person take?

Amanda Williams

Amanda Sington Williams’ first novel, The Eloquence of Desire was published by Sparkling Books in 2010 and has been translated into Turkish. She won an award for this novel in 2007 from the Royal Literary Fund. Since 2006 when she first started writing she has had many short stories published, including: Growing Pains by Bridgehouse Publishing, A Mother’s Love by Indigo Mosaic, Two Orchids by Sentinel Literary Quarterly. Unseasonable Weather by Dead Ink Press, The Woman at Number Six by Writing Raw, and many more.

Her second novel, Just Two Weeks is a psychological suspense and won the IPR Agents Pick in 2013.

website: www.amandasingtonwilliams.co.uk

blog: http://singtonwilliams.wordpress.com

Twitter https://twitter.com/SingtonWilliams

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/amandainbrighton?fref=ts

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/Amanda-Sington-Williams-writer/298320619836

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3526510.Amanda_Sington_Williams

 

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