📚#PostApocalypse Fiction. @SandraFirth3 Reviews What Was Once Home by @B_K_Bass, for Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT

Today’s team review is from Sandra.

Sandra blogs here https://www.firthproof.co.uk/index.php/book-reviews

Orange rose and Rosie's Book Review Team
Rosie’s Book Review Team

Sandra has been reading What Was Once Home by BK. Bass.

Book cover for What Was Once Home by B.K. Bass set against an orange sky and a green bridge
What Was Once Home by B.K. Bass

I’m not normally a fan of post-apocalyptic fiction, especially not when there are aliens involved as well, but when What Once Was Home appeared on the list of Rosie’s Book Review Team, I thought I’d try something outside of my comfort zone, and I’m so glad I did. BK Bass is an excellent storyteller and drew me right into this world where everyday life has changed so completely. The book opens with the prologue, and Jace, now in his sixties, is looking back to Landfall Day when the ‘twigs’ arrived and the world as he knew it ended. Forced to grow up fast in order to survive, Jace becomes someone the others look to for leadership. Initially, the various groups of survivors work together against the common enemy, but eventually a destructive tyrannical force seeks overall control, and they have to fight to hang on to their humanity.


Mostly told from Jace’s point of view, with excerpts from his autobiography at the beginning of each chapter, there are occasional ‘Interludes’ that fill in gaps in the story and help us to understand the bigger picture. Setting What Once Was Home in the rural backwater of Lewisburg in North Carolina emphasises the isolation after the invasion when all communication and transport networks have been destroyed. The outside world no longer exists and survival in the here and now is all that matters.


The characters are well drawn and believable, and the writing makes an alien invasion seem perfectly plausible. The world building is convincing and has a cinematic quality that I could imagine being turned into a film or TV series. This is the first book by BK Bass that I have read, but it won’t be the last – sometimes it’s worth stepping out of your comfort zone.

Orange rose book description
Book description

When his world is suddenly torn apart, one man must learn to survive in What Once Was Home.

Jace Cox’s life is changed when an overwhelming alien force invades the Earth with no warning or provocation. In the years that follow, he must not only fight to survive, but also learn what it means to be a man and a leader. As the situation grows more dire and the weight of loss bears down on Jace, he realizes his greatest challenge isn’t the alien invaders or even his fellow man.

It is holding onto his own humanity despite living in a world gone mad.

AmazonUK AmazonUS

🛸’A fine example of the #postapocalyptic genre.’ @TerryTyler4 reviews What Was Once Home by @B_K_Bass, for Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #TuesdayBookBlog🧟‍♂️

Today’s team review is from Terry.

She blogs here https://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.com/

Rosie's #Bookreview Team #RBRT

Terry has been reading What Was Once Home by B K Bass.

Book cover for What Was Once Home by B.K. Bass set against an orange sky and a green bridge
What Was Once Home by B.K. Bass

4.5 out of 5 stars

Jace Cox is a young teenager when the ‘twigs’ invade – and after one August day in 2034 his life will never been the same.  Fast forward a few years and he’s part of the militia fighting against them.  A few more years, and the town of Lewisburg has been reclaimed by its inhabitants, with Jace as its the sheriff – but the troubles are far from over.

Although I’m first in line when it comes to a post apocalyptic book, I wasn’t sure I’d like one about an alien invasion, thinking it might be too comic book-like.  But this isn’t.  B K Bass has made the subject totally convincing, and I really enjoyed it.  It’s got a great structure that kept my attention throughout – although the main story is told from Jace’s third person point of view in the early 2040s, there are occasional flashbacks to earlier, and also excerpts from the autobiography he wrote as an old man.  Aside from this, I loved the ‘interludes’ – sections told from other points of view in other areas, for a wider look at the situation.  These diversions from the main story were perfectly placed, and I could see how well thought-out the whole book is.

Bass has an easy writing style, creating good dramatic tension with a feeling of foreboding.  Every aspect of the book feels feasible, from the people who take charge in the new Lewisburg, those who want to be guided and given instructions, the fighting force, to the independent who want to do their own thing outside the walls – and, of course, the opportunity for the power-hungry to take over.

One small aspect I appreciated was how Jace, having been so young when the twigs arrived, knew little about life outside his immediate environment.  At one point an older person referred to a settlement as a ‘hippie commune’, and Jace didn’t know what he meant.  I loved that!

This book gives food for thought about war versus murder, what is ‘right’ when it comes to defending your home and your people, what it takes to live in harmony alongside those who are different from you, and leaves a couple of unanswered questions, which made me think that another book, perhaps after Jace’s time, would be most welcome.  I’d most certainly recommend What Was Once Home as a fine example of the post-apocalyptic genre.

Rosie's #Bookreview Team #RBRT

When his world is suddenly torn apart, one man must learn to survive in What Once Was Home.

Jace Cox’s life is changed when an overwhelming alien force invades the Earth with no warning or provocation. In the years that follow, he must not only fight to survive, but also learn what it means to be a man and a leader. As the situation grows more dire and the weight of loss bears down on Jace, he realizes his greatest challenge isn’t the alien invaders or even his fellow man.

It is holding onto his own humanity despite living in a world gone mad.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS