#BookBloggersSupport22 Challenge 7: Books You’ve Read From Recommendations From Fellow Book Bloggers.

The next challenge in my year long support for book bloggers. (Created by the ladies at PagesUnbound.)

It’s easy to recommend books to others, however it is much harder to match a book to a specific recipient. Some of the books below have been recommendations of either the book or the author. Others have been general recommendations on blogs from keen readers and I have gone ahead and bought my own copy.

Book covers for eleven book recommended to me by fellow book bloggers
Books recommended by book bloggers

First book: Hostile Ground (Stargate SG.1 by Sally Malcolm and Laura Harper) This is fan fiction, written around the popular Stargate TV series. Several authors have written ‘new’ episodes for the characters and I read a variety over the years. My favourite writer was Sally Malcolm, she caught the characters and the dialogue so well that I easily imagined them as real TV episodes.

Book blurb –

It was meant to be an easy mission, a walk in the park. But SG-1’s first trip off-world after Colonel O’Neill’s return from Edora (STARGATE SG-1: One Hundred Days) proves to be anything but easy.

Tapped for a covert assignment, O’Neill must conceal the truth from his team at all costs. So when Dr Daniel Jackson is injured and the mission begins to go awry, tensions quickly reach breaking point. Stranded on a hostile planet, and desperate to find a way home before it’s too late, O’Neill leads his fractured team on a desperate journey across a barren and forsaken world.

Faced with an enemy more vicious than anything they’ve encountered before, only SG-1’s strength as a unit will keep them alive – if the secret O’Neill is hiding doesn’t tear them apart first…

Second book: The Moment By Douglas Kennedy is a cold war thriller set mainly in Berlin. This was recommended to me because I like the edgy and tense themes in spy novels from this era.

Book blurb –

In this, his tenth novel, Douglas Kennedy has written that rare thing: a love story as morally complex as it is tragic and deeply reflective. Brilliantly gripping, it is an atmospherically dense, ethically tangled tale of romantic certainty and conflicting loyalties, all set amidst a stunningly rendered portrait of Berlin in the final dark years before The Wall came down.

Third book: Renegade by Laramie Briscoe. This is one book from the small town contemporary romance series set around a special task force group.

Book blurb –

Ryan “Renegade” Kepler

I’m the type of man who knows what I want. I make up my mind and stay in my lane, never veering off the course I set for myself.

Going into the military? Did it.
Serving overseas? Did it.
Youngest member of the Moonshine Task Force? That’s me.

Whitney Trumbolt

Ryan is ten years my junior, but damn, being a cougar never felt as good as it did the night we spent together. Now all I want to do is go back to how things were before.

But Ryan is my younger brother’s best friend, and where Trevor goes, Ryan goes. Instead I put my head in the sand and do my best to go about my life.

Fourth book: The Lady’s Slipper by Deborah Swift is historical fiction with a botanical theme.

Book blurb –

1660. King Charles II has returned from exile, but memories of the English Civil War still rankle. There are old scores to settle, and religious differences threaten to overturn a fragile peace. When Alice Ibbetson discovers a rare orchid, the Lady’s Slipper, growing in a wood belonging to Richard Wheeler, she is captivated by its beauty— though Wheeler, a Quaker, is determined to keep the flower where God intended it to grow.

Fifth book: The Dead Boxes Archive by John F Leonard is a collection of creepy mild horror short stories with a Dead Box theme.

Book blurb –

The Dead Boxes Archive is a chilling collection of short horror stories and horror novellas. Together for the first time in one volume, seven tales from the critically acclaimed Dead Boxes series.

Dead Boxes are scary things. Wonderful and dreadful secrets hiding themselves in plain view.
On the surface, they often appear to be ordinary, everyday objects. Items which are easily overlooked at first glance. Perhaps that’s just as well because the Dead Boxes are as far from ordinary and everyday as you can get. They hold miracle and mystery, horror and salvation, answers to questions best not asked and directions to places better left unfound.

Sixth book: Writing Vivid Dialogue by Rayne Hall is just one book from her Writer’s Craft series of non-fiction books. I’ve read several and often recommend them to writers to help hone their work.

Book blurb –

Do you want to write fast-paced, exciting, sizzling dialogue?

This book reveals professional dialogue techniques to characterise the speaker, carry the plot forward and entertain your readers.

This is not a beginner’s guide. I assume that you have mastered the basics of fiction writing, and you don’t need an explanation what dialogue is and why it matters for your story. But your dialogue isn’t as strong as your story deserves. Perhaps it drags, perhaps the characters all sound the same, and perhaps it lacks tension, wit or sparkle.

I’ll offer you a toolbox filled with techniques. These are not ‘rules’ every writer must follow, but tricks you can try. Pick, mix and match them to suit your characters and your story.

Seventh book: A Demon Bound by Debra Dunbar is the first book in the Imp series of urban fantasy tales. I’ve read all the books in the series and was really pleased to have found them.

Book blurb –

Samantha Martin is an imp, enjoying an extended vacation from Hel. All she wants to do is drink beer by the pool, play mischievous pranks on the humans, and get her hot neighbor in the sack. It’s a relaxing break from her infernal home, as long as she manages to avoid the angels, who won’t hesitate to execute her on sight. But when her naughty hellhound lands her in trouble with the local werewolf pack, Sam is blackmailed into helping track and catch a killer. The steps she must take to appease the werewolves will put her right in the crosshairs of the angels. And with angels, there is no second chance.

Eighth book: The Worst Journey In The World by John R. McKay is World War Two historical fiction set on a boat heading to Russia via the arctic.

Book blurb –

When George Martin joins the crew of the Royal Navy frigate, HMS Virtuous, he is keen to start his new life at sea, but after trips escorting relief cargoes to the stricken island of Malta, he soon realises that life on a warship is anything but easy.
After the invasion of the Soviet Union by German forces in 1941, George finds himself on the Virtuous’s most perilous journey yet, as it forms part of a convoy heading to Russia. Hunted by Nazi U-boats, surface ships and the Luftwaffe, the crew must endure its greatest foe – the harsh Arctic weather. With temperatures dropping to minus 30 degrees Centigrade and violent storms threatening to sink the ship, George endures the harsh reality of war, whilst at the same time pondering his uneasy relationship with the mysterious Glenda, the girl he has left behind.

Ninth book: Flood by Ann Swinfen is historical fiction set in the Fenlands during the seventeenth century.

Book blurb –

Violence, greed and betrayal threaten the remote communities of East Anglia in the seventeenth century, when ruthless and unscrupulous speculators steal their common lands, while fanatic Puritans bring accusations of heresy and witchcraft. Granddaughter of a local hero, Mercy Bennington moves out of the shadow of her elder brother to become a leader of the protestors, finding the strength to confront the enemies who endanger the survival of her village and her own life. Yet the violence wreaked upon the fragile fenlands unleashes a force no one can control – flood.

Tenth book: The Heretic Heir by G. Lawrence is Tudor historical fiction and features the lives of Mary and Elizabeth.

Book blurb –

February 1603, the last of the Tudor monarchs is dying, but Death must wait for Elizabeth of England to finish her tale…

As The Bastard Princess, Elizabeth Tudor, daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, has fought through a childhood of intrigue and peril to her place as the heir to the English throne. But as her sister, Mary I, the first anointed and sole Queen of England takes the crown, Elizabeth must face her most dangerous challenges yet… for Mary I is determined to return England to the Catholic faith, and will have none stand in her way.

Protestant Elizabeth knows that she must survive the suspicions and distrust of her sister, in a reign where rebellion and war freely stalked the lands of England.
To survive, this heretic heir must hone her skills in survival, wit and wile, in order that she may one day… become Queen.

Eleventh book: The Alchemical Detective by Kirsten Weiss is book one of a paranormal mystery series.

Book blurb –

This metaphysical detective has a murder to solve. But will a devilishly handsome casino owner get in the way?

There’s a storm on the horizon. Riga’s lost her magic and has come to Lake Tahoe for a fresh start and to spend quality time with her new love. But life for a metaphysical detective is never that simple.

Someone’s killing psychics in Lake Tahoe, and the police think Riga may be connected to the murders. The best way to prove her innocence? Catch the killer herself… if she can escape the monster-hunting “reality” show she’s committed to for long enough. And as the killer circles closer, she may become his next target…

If you love talking gargoyles, smart mysteries, and mature heroines with complicated lives, you’ll love this series.

I would happily recommend all these books to others.

Book Blogging: It’s About More Than The Book. #BookBloggerSupport22 @pagesunbound

Challenge 4 in my year long support for book bloggers from the ladies at PagesUnbound. Today’s post delves deeper into book blogging.

If you are active on social media and you love reading, you’ve probably read your fair share of book reviews from book bloggers – and, if you’re like me, I imagine you’ve been inspired to click the Amazon link a few times, after doing so!

This is why I started book blogging: I want to be a positive force in this corner of social media, linking readers to writers they may never have heard of before, and talking about books which I enjoy. Although I mix my reading with mainstream authors, I prefer to support indies.  Giving them an extra voice amongst the many million in cyberspace gives me great satisfaction.

There are no rules about writing a book review (except to avoid spoilers); everyone has their own slant, though it’s not just bloggers who are talking about books; pick any social media site and you will find book enthusiasts. However, a blog post can offer an opportunity for a longer article as opposed to other social sites which rely heavily on soundbites. A book blog gives a personal touch—most regular reviewers will have had a review rejected by Amazon, for any number of reasons; language, comparison to other works, sensitive subject matter, whatever. On your own blog, though, you can write exactly what you wish – and when you wish.  You might want to review two books a week, or one every two months.  Novels, short stories, novellas, whole series – it’s up to you.

A book blog gives a personal touch

Book bloggers are of key importance to the reading world as they are prepared to share their thoughts and feelings about a book online, where billions of potential readers can access the reviews. There’s no word limit, which is good when you feel the need to wax lyrical about a book, one you stayed up late reading or a book you just don’t want to let go. There’s nothing quite like finding another bookworm who felt the same way about a particular story; I have some fabulous book friends made through book blogging.  We’ve had meet-ups where we talk book for hours – it’s marvellous!

Some say that its popularity is on the wane; like everything that first made its stamp as the internet found its way into everyone’s homes, it has ebbed and flowed. Perhaps book blogging could be likened to those who don’t mind travelling in the slower lane; those who want to watch the view and take their time. However, I have no doubt that there are still new audiences to capture, for anyone who wants to use their social media profiles to join us in sharing their bookish thoughts in the online bookworm world! Rosie Amber’s Book Review Blog has been going for ten years now – it’s taken time, enthusiasm, adaptability and the support of my family, review team members, publishers and authors who submit to me regularly.  My best blogging tool, though, is the fact that I enjoy it.

‘Perhaps book blogging could be likened to those who don’t mind travelling in the slower lane; those who want to watch the view and take their time.’

Is there a future for book blogging? Sadly, the majority of readers in the general public don’t post book reviews, which is why, for authors and publishers, book bloggers are like angels sprinkling magic dust. Unless a book has the backing of one of The Big Five publishers with a large marketing budget, getting it seen by its target demographic is an uphill challenge. If book reviewers start raving about a book, it will hit social media and draw attention to itself. Every person who sees its cover, sees someone tweeting the title, notices that it’s got yet another great review, is another who may decide that, yes, today is the day they’re going to Amazon to buy it. 

Book bloggers are like angels sprinkling magic dust.

If, like me, you enjoy delving a little deeper into a book after reading the book blurb but before making a purchase, go seek out some book blogs who read the type of books you love.  We’re not paid by publishers or authors, so we have no agenda – we simply write what we feel.  We don’t claim any great skills in literary critique; we use our own words, as they come out of our heads.  We’re ordinary people who have one massive thing in common with you – we’re obsessed with books, and we want to tell the world about those we love! 

Re-Blog From The Tolkien Reading Event. The Real J.R.R. Tolkien by Jesse Xander, Reviewed by Rosie Amber @PagesUnbound

My guest post for this event. See the original post here.

Every year on March 25, the anniversary of the Downfall of Sauron, the Tolkien Society hosts Tolkien Reading Day. This year’s theme selected by the Tolkien Society is Love and Friendship. The primary goal is to promote the reading of the works of J.R R. Tolkien! To celebrate, Pages Unbound will be hosting several days of Tolkien-related posts. In addition to our own thoughts, we will be featuring a number of guest posts!


Real JRR Tolkien Book Cover

OFFICIAL SUMMARY

The Real JRR Tolkien: The Man Who Created Middle Earth is a comprehensive biography of the linguist and writer; taking the reader from his formative years of home-schooling, through the spires of Oxford, to his romance with his wife-to-be on the brink of war, and onwards into his phenomenal academic success and his creation of the seminal high fantasy world of Middle Earth. “The Real JRR Tolkien” delves into his influences, places, friendships, triumphs and tragedies, with particular emphasis on how his remarkable life and loves forged the worlds of The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings. Using contemporary sources and comprehensive research, “The Real JRR Tolkien” offers a unique insight into the life and times of one of Britain’s greatest authors, from cradle to grave to legacy. 

REVIEW

Jesse Xander believes that much of the success of Tolkien’s writing is because of its believability, which Xander suggests is due to the way Tolkien immersed himself totally in the worlds he created. Xander shows the author’s complexities, his beliefs and ideologies, giving his audience insight into the man behind the books. Secondly, Xander goes on to consider the inspirations for Middle-earth.

Tolkien said: “One writes such a story not out of the leaves of trees still to be observed, nor by means of botany and soil-science, but it grows like a seed in the dark out of the leaf-mould of the mind.”

Xander has a passion for the world of Middle-earth, understanding how the communities, histories and languages of the inhabitants were considered on an anthropological scale. Once Xander saw the whole picture it was easier to fully appreciate Tolkien’s work.

The book begins with Tolkien’s early years: his birth in South Africa and the history behind the name John Ronald Reuel Tolkien. Xander suggests that the recurring theme of multiple names for Tolkien’s characters may have stemmed from the many different names that family and friends knew him by over the years. Xander discovered that Tolkien’s relatives, many of whom were lovers of storytelling, may have influenced his need to create fiction.

In 1896, Tolkien’s mother moved her family to the village of Sarehole; at an impressionable age, Tolkien is said to have found himself in the “heart of the English countryside.”

Jumping ahead to the summer before Tolkien went to Oxford University, his aunt took him and his younger brother on a trip to Europe, part of which involved trekking in Switzerland through mountains and valleys and a visit to the Aletsch Glacier. Some of the locations from this trip were some of the real places that inspired his work. There is also the suggestion that the all-male world of Oxford University may have been reflected in Tolkien’s works; as Xander said,  “Many of the women in Middle-earth are noted by their absence.”  A side discussion considers the following:

“Hobbit women appear either as deceased rebels, redeemable crones or love interests with barely anything documented about them.”

I was very interested in Tolkien’s background knowledge of ancient languages and dialects and how this evolved through his time in academia. While at Oxford, he was encouraged by one of his professors to study the Celtic languages; he began with ancient Welsh, and his love of languages became a part of his writing, for example the Elven script. I also liked how the author linked events and experiences with such detail from Tolkien’s writing, giving a clear picture of his influences.

There are a few black and white photographs to break up the writing, which were just enough to leave me with some images in my mind of the author. There is, however, much more in this book as it follows Tolkien’s life, family, friendships and his written works. I found the book interesting as previously I knew only the author’s name and very little else, while Xander offers some fascinating discussion topics which fans of Tolkien might like to consider.

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Challenge 3: Leave Comments On Ten Book Blogs #BookBloggerSupport22 @pagesunbound

It’s time for challenge 3 in this year long support for book bloggers. Created by the ladies at PagesUnbound I have committed to this because I enjoy being part of a great body of book lovers.

This month the challenge is to leave comments on ten different book blogger’s posts. I decided to make a blog post about this with links to the posts and book bloggers that I visited. This was actually harder than I anticipated because although I might comment on lots of blog posts, the interest is mine, while I wanted to make this post universal for other readers. So I chose posts more carefully to add to this list.

  1. Author Rennie St James runs a monthly book chat post which breaks down a chosen book. Rennie takes a sample of reviews of each book and discusses the book from a reader’s point of view and then from a writer’s point of view. February’s book was urban fantasy Urban Shaman by C.E. Murphy
  2. Book blogger Siena, posted about her reasons for quitting Instagram. Any social media platform has got to work for you and be enjoyable. She found it hard to drive traffic to her blog from Instagram. This can be a problem as you can’t have a live link to your blog from each Instagram post (like Twitter).
  3. Becky from Crooks Book Blog ask us about love triangles in books. Do you like them or not?
  4. Damyanti wrote a post that featured avid reader Kacee Jones Pakunpanya, who talks about how she found a way to work with her dyslexia so that she can still enjoy reading.
  5. Saturdays At The Cafe is a round up of the books that Jonetta from Blue Mood Cafe has added to her book shelf. There is always a great selection to tempt me.
  6. Davida wrote a #SixOnSunday post using books covers to show her support for #StandWithUkraine
  7. Sue has been running a month long feature on book sequels. This post is about Tom Williams and his historical fiction series based on a British spy during the Napoleonic wars. 
  8. Karen from Booker Talk is joining in with #ReadingIrelandMonth22 her post talks about her 5 favourite Irish writers.
  9. Cathy from 746 books has more Irish themes. Her Six Degrees Of Separation post is Irish themed.
  10. Raging Fluff is also a co-host of Reading Ireland month. Here is an interesting post about two different books written about former slave Tony Small.

Read my introductory post here.

Plus my challenge 1 post: 10 Book Bloggers Whose Posts I Enjoy Reading here.

My challenge 2 post: 10 New-To-Me-book bloggers is here

What about you, do you try to leave comments on blog posts?

Challenge 2: Introduce 10 New-To-Me Book Bloggers. #BookBloggerSupport22 @pagesunbound

Brought to you by the ladies at Pages Unbound, this idea is to help boost book bloggers.

Read my introductory post here.

Plus my challenge 1 post: 10 Book Bloggers Whose Posts I Enjoy Reading here.

For my second challenge I have followed 10 new-to-me book bloggers and have been enjoying and sharing some of their posts on my social media.

Here’s who I’ve followed.

Kate from The Quick And The Read is from the UK and is a life-long bookworm. She is on a mission to read all the books that she can. Find Kate on Twitter @TheQuickandthe4

Jeff Sexton from Book Anon lives in Florida and became an exclusive e-reader in 2013 and now reads a book a week. I found Jeff on Twitter @jsxtn83 or on Instagram @jsxtn83

Donna from Donna’s Book Blog lives in Nuneaton, England and is an avid reader of books from netgalley. Donna’s on Twitter @dmmaguire391

Jonetta from the Blue Mood Cafe lives in Greensboro, NC but hails from Virginia. She reads most genres and appreciates those who not only write well but can deliciously craft a character and a tale. Twitter @BlueMoodCafe1

Belinda Witzenhausen lives in Toronto, she’s a book blogger, writer, creativity coach, artist, student, bookworm, history geek, armchair archaeologist, amateur photographer, coffee connoisseur & hubby’s grossly under-paid bass roadie. Find her on Twitter @BWitzenhausen or Instagram @bwitzenhausen

Gem from Dyslexic Reader lives in Cheshire, since she was diagnosed with dyslexia she has worked hard to prove that being dyslexic doesn’t have to stop you achieving academic and goals. She began her blog to post review of books that she has enjoyed reading. Gem’s on Twitter @dyslexicreader2 or Instagram @dyslexicreader

Katy from KKEC Reads live in North California and she says ‘The written word has always brought such peace to my life; books and stories have always been the best companions. Find Katy on Twitter @kkecreads or Instagram @kkecreads

Wendy is from The Bashful Bookworm and has retired recently, she now has time to renew her love of books. She’s from Flagstaff, Arizona. Find Wendy on Twitter @BashfulBookwm or Instagram @the_bashful_bookworm

Jenny from Jenny Lou’s Book reviews recently began book blogging during the pandemic as an aid to getting through the uncertain times. She lives in Essex, England. She’s on Twitter @McclintonJenny and Instagram @mcclinton1985

Kate from Everywhere And Nowhere lives in Scotland. She describes herself as a reader, reviewer, a composer of language, a listener of podcasts, a tasty treat maker, a procrastinator, a lady of ink, a purveyor of items with lenses. Occasionally a peculiar creature, oftentimes a typical one. Find her on Twitter @Kate_everywhere and Instagram @kate_everywhere

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It’s never too late to join a challenge like this. To find out more details check out the full post from Pages Unbound here.

Challenge 1: Introduce 10 Book Bloggers Whose Posts You Enjoy Reading #BookBloggerSupport22 @pagesunbound

Previously I have introduced this new challenge from the ladies at Pages Unbound, with a blog post which you can be read here.

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Today’s post is my entry for challenge 1: Introduce 10 book bloggers that I enjoy.

Davida Chazan (Aka The Chocolate Lady) lives in Jerusalem. She posts book reviews for adult literary fiction – both contemporary and historical – with an emphasis on women’s fiction and biographical fiction. She likes culinary fiction and is passionate about chocolate. Davida often has posts which encourage a good discussion around book related topics. Find her on Twitter @ChocolateLady57

Karen from BookerTalk is a life-long book addict from Wales. On her blog you will find conversations about books. They might be reactions to the book she has just read or chats about her latest purchases or what she’s planning to buy next. Occasionally she might grumble about the size of her TBR mountain. Karen likes to support Welsh authors. Find her on Twitter @BookerTalk

Jo at Tea And Cake For The Soul is a life-style blogger, but she also loves books. She blogs about upcycling, travel, books, and of course cake. She also discusses matters such as sustainability, gardening, and money-saving tips, and offers ideas about how to promote kindness and improve your well-being. I discovered that Jo lives quite close to me and I have plans to meet her soon. Find Jo on Twitter @JoJacksonWrites

Kim from Brockway Gatehouse lives in Salisbury and is a fiction editor. She is currently promoting book bloggers in a feature on her BG blog, click through from here to read her introductory post. Do ask if she is still open for more book bloggers for her posts. Follow Kim on Twitter @KimProofreader

Stephanie Jane from Literary Flits is a proud vegan. On her blog she supports books from indie and small press publishers. She also reads and promotes books from global literature. Stephanie will review books that she ‘loved, liked or loathed!’ Find her on Twitter @Stephanie_Jne

Stacey and her team of reviewers at Whispering Stories post reviews for a wide genre of books. They also feature and promote authors each week on their blog. Stacey lives in Manchester and is a mum and carer for two of her children. Look out for the book related giveaways that Stacey runs. Find Whispering Stories on Twitter @storywhispers

Yvonne from vonnibee turned her love for reading into her book blog. I recently started following her book review posts. As well as her reading, Yvonne takes part in book blog tours and other book promotions. Find her on Twitter @yvonnembee

Jo from My Chestnut Reading Tree describes herself as a proud mum. Proud nana. Lover of Marmite. Book obsessed Norfolk girl living in Cheshire with her grumpy Scotsman. I met Jo in person a few years ago at a blogging event. Jo enjoys thrillers and contemporary fiction. Find her on Twitter @jocatrobertson

Sarah from By The Letter Book Reviews is an avid reader and loves to share the books that she enjoys. She is also a freelance publicist for Bookouture. I met Sarah, briefly, at a Bloggers Bash event. Follow Sarah on Twitter @sarahhardy681

Anne from Being Anne is retired and lives in Wetherby, West Yorkshire. Anne reads a range of books and has received several awards for her support of authors and their books. She was the RNA (Romantic Novelists’ Association) Media Star of 2019. I met Anne at a book blogging event in London. Find Anne on Twitter @Williams13Anne

It’s never too late to join a challenge like this. To find out more details check out the full post from Pages Unbound here.

A New Challenge To Boost Book Blogging. #BookBloggerSupport22 from @pagesunbound

The ladies from PagesUnbound have created a new challenge, which can be completed in your own time-frame or made into an easy year-long challenge, to bring back some much needed support for book blogging. The last two years have been difficult and many people have struggled to read, review, write blog posts, comment and share posts. We all understand. But, now let’s get back to what we enjoy.

Here’s what to do:

Introduction post: Write an introduction post and link it to the Pages Unbound post.

Challenge 1 (January):

Write a blog post about 10 book bloggers that you have enjoyed reading posts from.

Challenge 2 (February):

Write a blog post about 10 new-to-you book bloggers.

Challenge 3 (March):

Leave comments on 10 book blogger’s posts.

Challenge 4 (April):

Write a blog post in support of book bloggers. Some ideas (if needed) are:

A round-up of blog links you enjoyed reading in the past week or month.
A post about why you enjoy reading book blogs in general.
A post about how other people can support book blogs.
Challenge 5 (May):

Share 10 book blog posts on your social media pages.

Challenge 6 (June):

Respond to 5 comments that other people have left on another book blog – the idea is to start a conversation or a discussion rather than just leaving a new comment about the blog post.

Challenge 7(July):

Write a blog post about books that you have read because of other book bloggers. Your list can be specific (I read X book because Y blogger recommended it), or it can be more general (I read these books because they were popular with book bloggers in general).

Challenge 8 (August):

Follow 5 book bloggers who have been blogging for less than a year.

Optional – write a blog post supporting them (N.B. It isn’t always easy to find out how long bloggers have been blogging, so just do your best.)

Challenge 9 (September):

Write a guest post for another book blog or feature a guest book blogger on your own blog. (If you don’t know who to ask, I’m sure that others taking part in this challenge would be delighted to help.)

Challenge 10 (October):

Take the time to fully read 10 posts and leave a “like”. Bonus: comment on them, as well.

Challenge 11 (November):

In 5 of your own blog posts add links back to other book bloggers.

Ideas:

Creating a round-up of interesting links from other blogs.
Writing a discussion post inspired by someone else’s book blog and link back to it.
Linking to other bloggers’ reviews at the end of your reviews.
Linking to another blogger’s post in a discussion post to support a point.
Including quotes from other bloggers and linking back to them in one of your posts.

Challenge 12 (December):

Share 10 more book blogger posts to your social media.

Extra ideas for mini-posts:

Comment on a book tour post. (Why? So that publishers can see bloggers have an audience and these marketing posts are reaching people.)
Comment on an author interview. (Why? These posts tend to get fewer comments, so commenting shows authors and publishers that people are reading them — and blogs in general.)
Tag a publisher on social media when you retweet a 5 star review from a blogger. (Why? These posts often get little recognition from publishers.)
Vote for book bloggers in any end-of-the year awards where “book influencers” are nominated. (Why? Usually these categories are dominated by bookstagrammers and booktubers.)
Share your secrets to blogging “success.” (Why? We’re all in this together! If you have a great way to get traffic or comments, let others know so we can succeed as a community.)

Read the full post at Pages Unbound for more details.