🛸’A fine example of the #postapocalyptic genre.’ @TerryTyler4 reviews What Was Once Home by @B_K_Bass, for Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #TuesdayBookBlog🧟‍♂️

Today’s team review is from Terry.

She blogs here https://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.com/

Rosie's #Bookreview Team #RBRT

Terry has been reading What Was Once Home by B K Bass.

Book cover for What Was Once Home by B.K. Bass set against an orange sky and a green bridge
What Was Once Home by B.K. Bass

4.5 out of 5 stars

Jace Cox is a young teenager when the ‘twigs’ invade – and after one August day in 2034 his life will never been the same.  Fast forward a few years and he’s part of the militia fighting against them.  A few more years, and the town of Lewisburg has been reclaimed by its inhabitants, with Jace as its the sheriff – but the troubles are far from over.

Although I’m first in line when it comes to a post apocalyptic book, I wasn’t sure I’d like one about an alien invasion, thinking it might be too comic book-like.  But this isn’t.  B K Bass has made the subject totally convincing, and I really enjoyed it.  It’s got a great structure that kept my attention throughout – although the main story is told from Jace’s third person point of view in the early 2040s, there are occasional flashbacks to earlier, and also excerpts from the autobiography he wrote as an old man.  Aside from this, I loved the ‘interludes’ – sections told from other points of view in other areas, for a wider look at the situation.  These diversions from the main story were perfectly placed, and I could see how well thought-out the whole book is.

Bass has an easy writing style, creating good dramatic tension with a feeling of foreboding.  Every aspect of the book feels feasible, from the people who take charge in the new Lewisburg, those who want to be guided and given instructions, the fighting force, to the independent who want to do their own thing outside the walls – and, of course, the opportunity for the power-hungry to take over.

One small aspect I appreciated was how Jace, having been so young when the twigs arrived, knew little about life outside his immediate environment.  At one point an older person referred to a settlement as a ‘hippie commune’, and Jace didn’t know what he meant.  I loved that!

This book gives food for thought about war versus murder, what is ‘right’ when it comes to defending your home and your people, what it takes to live in harmony alongside those who are different from you, and leaves a couple of unanswered questions, which made me think that another book, perhaps after Jace’s time, would be most welcome.  I’d most certainly recommend What Was Once Home as a fine example of the post-apocalyptic genre.

Rosie's #Bookreview Team #RBRT

When his world is suddenly torn apart, one man must learn to survive in What Once Was Home.

Jace Cox’s life is changed when an overwhelming alien force invades the Earth with no warning or provocation. In the years that follow, he must not only fight to survive, but also learn what it means to be a man and a leader. As the situation grows more dire and the weight of loss bears down on Jace, he realizes his greatest challenge isn’t the alien invaders or even his fellow man.

It is holding onto his own humanity despite living in a world gone mad.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

The Singing Bowl by Roy Dimond

The Singing BowlThe Singing Bowl by Roy Dimond

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The Singing Bowl is an epic journey for mankind. It follows a Tibetan Monk as he searches the World for answers to a mystery and a long lost book. Forced to flee from invading Chinese Communists the monk is one of a religious group called The Gatherers, he begins by running for his life from Tibet and walking over the mountains to Nepal.

There are many people who will help and teach the monk along his journey and the author uses few names, instead he gives them identities which help form a distinct picture in the mind of the reader. For instance “The Wise Woman of Alexandria”, “The Nomad” and “Wife of Big Brother”. There are some wonderful characters and many have starring roles in the journey of the monk. He travels through The Ancient World, The Old World and The New World and in each world he has a lesson to learn from the people who make up that place.

The people he meets are also from all religions and they show their generosity when they help him and share their homes and food with him. He meets some of his fellow Gatherers who are on their own journeys and interacts with them before they each move on. It’s not all easy, the Communists search for the monk and want to stop and destroy him because of what he represents. Many times his life is at risk and he escapes because of some faithful friends.

I didn’t want the book to end although the Monk’s mystery was solved. My favourite part of the journey was from the Ancient World, I thought I was learning as much as the monk. I wanted to search the dusty book shops and sit for hours pouring over long lost books. I wanted to race through the book, not putting it down, but I also wanted to sit back and reflect on some of the parts that I had read, it really made me think about our World and if you choose to read this book I hope it makes you think as well.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

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