Digital Fortress by Dan Brown

Digital FortressDigital Fortress by Dan Brown

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A fast paced story with several intense build ups to speedy action. This book saw action in Spain and America. Plenty of trails to suspects for the reader to follow. Some complex mathematical sequences and problems to solve. Codes and code breaking being at the heart of the storyline. A huge computer gets a code to break and threatens national security. The key to abort the worm which penetrates the system outwits the top encrypting brains and the suspense goes to the wire. Fewer links to ancient texts and secrets than some of Dan’s other books, but still enjoyable.

Look out for a copy from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

View all my reviews on Goodreads.

An Abundance of Katherines by John Green

Today I would like to welcome another young book reviewer to the blog, I hope you enjoy these as much as me. Thank you Louise for this review.

An Abundance of Katherines

‘‘An Abundance of Katherines’ – by John Green

Rating: 4/5

Colin Singleton is, coincidentally, rather unlucky with relationships. Having been dumped by a total 19 girls, all with the name of Katherine, it’s no surprise that this former child prodigy is feeling somewhat… rejected. However, with the endless possibilities of a summer road trip stretching ahead of him and his over-indulged best friend, can Colin finally move on from his dire attempts at love with the help of Satan’s Hearse, ‘Gutshot’ and a certain wide-eyed girl who doesn’t go by the name of Katherine?

My favourite aspect of this book has to be the characters. All were relatable, and most were loveable  and as each overcame their own challenges and developed as people, we are provided with the frequent and inspiring morals of the story. I found this book to be such an uplifting read and, being about teenagers, I found the characters to be very similar to my own friends, and even to myself at some points!

Whilst it adds depth to the novel, there are references to mathematics throughout, with graphs drawn in to show the emotional development of poor Colin as he struggles to solve The Theorem of Underlying Katherine Predictability. However, the ever thoughtful John Green adds most of the mathematics into an ‘appendix’ at the end, so it isn’t a fundamental part of the novel; I couldn’t even look at Colin’s final equation!

I would therefore recommend this book for anyone who enjoys a thought-provoking but equally heart-warming read; it was so sweet that I finished it in less than 24 hours!’

See this book here on Amazon.