The Inheritance by Elaine Jeremiah

The InheritanceThe Inheritance by Elaine Jeremiah

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The Inheritance has two main settings, a farm in Cornwall and London. The story includes sibling rivalry and secrets amongst them. Emma is the daughter whose story is similar to a modern day prodigal son. She longs to escape the back water of Cornwall and the hard graft life on the farm. She is easily led and rather innocent, finding herself amongst selfish friends and finds out the hard way what she values most in life.

Kate is Emma’s sister she currently works on the farm having given up sixth form college after the shocking disappearance of her boyfriend. Hiding away on the farm doesn’t have all the answers for Kate either, so it was good to see her return to her studies.

There is a mystery surrounding the death of the girl’s mother whom they both call “Meredith” because she failed to live up to the maternal needs of the girls. Their father was forced to lie about Meredith’s death in order to protect his children.

Secrets; Kate doesn’t tell her family about Steven, Steven doesn’t tell Kate the truth about his family. The past catches up with Kate soon enough when she returns to college to study evening classes. She meets Steven’s Guardian and soon fears she is being stalked.

This book sprinkles a little mystery, a first romance, a moral story and a big happy ever after ending.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

View all my reviews On Goodreads

Guest Authors Sean and Daniel Campbell

Today with have writing duo Sean and Daniel Campbell as our guests. They are the author’s of yesterday’s book Cleaver Square. Here is a link to the post if you missed it. http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-4p2

Sean Dan pic for RA interview re Cleaver Square

Let’s find out more about them.

Sean Campbell

1) Where is your home town?

We’re both from Portsmouth, which is a Naval city on the south coast of England. Sean’s been a Londoner on and off for all of his adult life, but Dan’s still in Portsmouth and is currently at the city’s Highbury Catering College (which includes culinary luminary Claire Smyth among it’s alumnus).

2) How long have you been writing as a duo?

We’ve been writing together since 2012, when we made a St Patrick’s Day bet that we could write a novel in 90 days or less. Dead on Demand, our first book, was the result.

3) Where did the title of the book “Cleaver Square” come from?

It’s a real place – with one of London’s finest pubs in it. There is no 36B, but we’ve otherwise been pretty faithful to reality. The square is a unique slice of London that is almost surreally quiet, with gorgeous townhouses and a huge green that is used for street parties and boules in the summer.

4) If this your first murder mystery?

We had several murders in Dead on Demand, but that was told from the point of view of the antagonist, who tries to plot the perfect murder (and comes pretty close to succeeding!). Cleaver Square is our first book that’s firmly in the ‘mystery’ bracket, but it also crosses into the suspense genre too.

5) What writing roles did you both take on?

Dan does some of the big picture stuff, but I get the research elements (so if you find an error in forensics or police procedure, that’s probably my fault).

6) How long did it take to research the material for the book?

It took a little while – we took nearly eighteen months over this on and off. I trained as a barrister so the legal side is dead easy, and I have a number of friends in the forces as well as some handy contacts in the world of forensics to annoy in the hopes of getting things right.

7) You’ve got some great characters in the book, mine were the Lovejoys purely because their name conjured up memories of a favourite TV series of mine. Which character was your favourite?

Probably Tina – she’s a bit of a tart, but she’s loveable with it. And who doesn’t like drinking/ board game mash-ups?

8) Which were the hardest parts of the story to write and why?

Charlie’s back-story – he’s had a rough time of it, and getting the timings/ age consistent with all the minor elements of the forensics, as well as making sure that little things like sunrise times stay consistent takes a lot of co-ordination. Thankfully, we had some excellent editors on board to catch our faux-pas.

9) Tell us about some of your other books

Dead on Demand is the most well-known – there are tens of thousands of copies out there in the readersphere, and we hope to reach a few more this year. We’ve also got a few non-fiction titles out, including one on the British Peerage system. I don’t know if you’ve ever seen the ‘Become a Lord or Lady’ Christmas gifts, where you buy a square foot of land, and allegedly become a Lord, but they’re, at best, misleading. Laird is simply Scottish for ‘landowner’ rather than denoting a title. There are ways to become a Lord, but a square foot of mud probably doesn’t cut it.

10) Do you have ideas for another murder for Detective Chief Inspector Morton to investigate?

Absolutely – we’ve got an idea that we’re outlining at the moment that combines a dash of political intrigue with what we hope our most original murder method yet.

Product Details

Dan Campbell

1) Where is your home town?

Portsmouth.

2) How long have you been writing as a duo?

Duo? I do all the hard work.

3) Where did the title of the book “Cleaver Square” come from?

Well, we thought about Knife Octagon for a while, but that’s just too multi-sided.

4) If this your first murder mystery?

I never killed nobody guvnor. Honest, I didn’t.

5) What writing roles did you both take on?

I wrote. I looked pretty. Sean provided the requisite age to get taken seriously (I was 16 when ‘we’ wrote Dead on Demand)

6) How long did it take to research the material for the book?

Sean did that. Or so he says. I think he just makes it up. He’s got that convincing look about him.

7) You’ve got some great characters in the book, mine were the Lovejoys purely because their name conjured up memories of a favourite TV series of mine. Which character was your favourite?

Bertram Ayala – he’s almost as vain as I am.

8) Which were the hardest parts of the story to write and why?

The middle is the worst. You’ve not got that “just started” motivation, and the end isn’t in sight yet.

9) Tell us about some of your other books.

I’m doing a couple of solo projects this year – watch out for The Utopia Project, an ‘End of the world’ story that comes out in December.

10) Do you have ideas for another murder for Detective Chief Inspector Morton to investigate?

Yes – can’t say exactly what just yet, but if you think an ice bullet is clever, this will blow your mind.

Product Details

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Cleaver Square by Sean and Daniel Campbell

Cleaver SquareCleaver Square by Daniel Campbell

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cleaver Square is a murder mystery / thriller set in and around London. It opens with a murder scene in Hackney Marshes on a cold January morning. A body is found by Robert Lyons, a member of the North London Metal Detectors. A post mortem reveals the body is of a young teenage boy, who has been in the ground for some weeks. A key item of evidence is a valuable watch found with the victim by the metal detector.

Whilst the murder investigation gets underway led by Detective Chief Inspector David Morton, the readers are introduced to Charlie Matthews a young lad who is being taken to a new foster home by his social worker. Charlie’s history is tragic, both parents died in a car crash, then a set of foster parents died in a house fire, he is being moved once again through the overloaded social care system.

With a murder case going no where and Morton working long unsocial hours his home life is shattered when he and his wife are the victims of fraud and all their bank accounts and savings are emptied and their credit cards compromised.

DNA testing of evidence lead the team to ask “Who is Charlie Matthews?” But they are no closer to answering the question when Detective Tina Vaughn goes missing whilst following her own line of enquires.

Finally a new detective finds a new angle and a window of opportunity for the murder crime is revealed. The Police can close in on the suspects, but which Police department will get there first?

This was a cleverly written book, which kept me interested the whole way through, I wanted to solve the crimes too. The book tackles some serious real life issues which are sad possibilities in todays world.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Sean and Daniel are our guest authors on the blog tomorrow, so do come back and meet them.

Guest Author Scott Fivelson

Today our guest on the blog is author Scott Fivelson, he writes both plays and books and has taken time out from his busy schedule to tell us more about himself.

4web_ScottFivelson_intense

 

1)  Where is your hometown?

Born and raised in Chicago, Illinois, USA. City of the Big Shoulders, as the poet Carl Sandburg called it. He must have been an early Chicago Bears fan… The very mention of Chicago or the Bears probably sends an e-mail alert to Jim Belushi.

2) How long have you been writing? Where did your love of writing begin?

Nobody said anything about loving it… But yes, you guessed it, I like writing. I think it started as a kid as a way of being late for dinner. Wait a minute, that doesn’t speak well for my mother’s cooking.  She made outstanding coconut pancakes. (I guess this is the first time I’ve ever written about them…) The truth is, I can’t actually remember why I liked writing, apparently gravitated to it without any sort of conscious decision. Maybe that’s one of the things that makes it interesting to me. Maybe that’s why I sometimes write mysteries – when I’m not writing satires or romantic comedies. Or sometimes my writing combines these elements. Speaking of which…

3)  In October I reviewed your play “Dial L for Latch-Key.” Can you tell the readers a little about the play and where the idea came from?

Dial L for Latch-Key

Here is the link to my review http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-2LY

I loved Alfred Hitchcock’s film of the play, “Dial M for Murder.” A few years ago, while watching the movie again, I found myself quite caught up in the notion of a play inspired by just the last act of “Dial M,” where the detective employs all his brilliance and chicanery to bring Ray Milland to justice. It seemed a perfect little arena to revisit all of Hitchcock – or as much as I could fit into this stuffed bird of a play on the Bates Motel wall.

4)  “Dial L for Latch-Key” has been performed in some big cities. Can you tell the readers where it has been seen on stage?

The play has been presented on a number of stages, including the Upstairs at the Gatehouse Theatre in Highgate Village, London, the New End Theatre in Hampstead, London, and The Phoenix Theatre in San Francisco, produced by Off Broadway West.

Off Broadway West

Off Broadway West

Upstairs at the Gatehouse poster

Upstairs at the Gatehouse poster

5)  If someone downloads/buys your play and wants to put it on stage, do they need a license? Do you get any special royalty payment? Or do you only get the income from the original purchase?

My publisher, Hen House Press in New York, has the print rights, and they publish “Dial L for Latch-Key” as a paperback and as an eBook, available on Amazon, BarnesandNoble, et al. I hold the stage rights, and so I have the final word on where it gets produced. I get contacted by theater companies, or sometimes it’s one proactive actor or director who’s feeling inspired to mount a production. I can be contacted at: infojet@earthlink.net. My publisher Hen House Press will relay offers as well. The payment for a license is ordinarily a per performance royalty fee. If it’s a very small theater troupe or school situation, I’ve been known to make an exception and waive royalties, but usually it’s a per perf fee, yes.

6)  Tell us about some of the other plays you’ve written, what are they about?

Since “Dial L for Latch-Key” is a one-act comedy mystery, when it ran at the Upstairs at the Gatehouse theatre in London, we put it on a double bill with a one-act dramatic thriller I’ve written, called “Leading the Witness.” A young blind woman has been witness to a murder, and the only one who believes her is a blind New York City homicide cop – a detective who’s lost his sight in the line of duty. As I say, that one’s also a one-act, but it plays like a mini-movie. Very cinematic. Ironic, for having two blind characters as the leads.  It’s fairly thrilling, I think. James Torme – an absolutely brilliant actor as well being as one of the best jazz singers on the scene today – his father was the legendary Mel Torme, and the talent shows – James played the “Inspector” in “Dial L for Latch-Key” and he also portrayed the “Det. Lt. John School” in “Leading the Witness.” James told me that he prepared by having a friend lead him around London, eyes closed, or something terrifically Method like that… He lived to tell the tale, and was wonderful in the part.

7)  You’re multi-talented and have written books too, what genres have you written in?

You’re awfully kind. We ought to do these interviews more often… I started out writing a number of satirical pieces and short stories, and many of those appeared in Chicago Magazine, Playboy Magazine, and the Los Angeles Times. I’m especially proud of my novel, “Tuxes” (BeachSide Press), a comic take on the classic rich-family, multi-generational saga.  It’s like Edna Ferber’s “Giant,” TV series like “Dallas” and “Dynasty,” then throw in Albert Brooks and even a little Mary Shelley.  Ask.com has compared it to Kurt Vonnegut, so I’ve got to remember to send them flowers or something. As a screenwriter, I’ve worked in other genres. The late, great David Carradine played a singer-songwriter in “American Reel,” opposite the very fine British actor Michael Maloney, whom you may recognize from his work in Kenneth Branagh films like “Henry V” and “Hamlet.” Mariel Hemingway was in it too, which was lovely. I co-wrote the picture with a great friend, Junior Burke.

8)  Your short story , “A Farewell to Legs,” is also available as an audiobook. The reader is Mariel Hemingway. The book has been described as written in a Hemingway style in our time. How coincidental is the reader’s name?

Truth to tell, not too coincidental. The actress Mariel Hemingway (“Manhattan,” “The Contender,” many other films) is the granddaughter of the iconic author Ernest Hemingway. Of course, I knew Mariel from having worked with her on “American Reel.” Still, it was a real coup and an artistic blessing when she agreed to read what is essentially a tribute to and sendup of the classic Hemingway prose style. Standing in the recording booth before Mariel started the audiobook reading, she got off a good one: “Wait a minute… I’m channeling my grandfather.” Maybe she was. Her reading was good and true, as Hemingway himself might have written.

9) What are the biggest differences in writing a play as opposed to writing a novel?

I equally enjoy writing fiction and for the stage. For me, it’s like it’s the difference between living internally and living externally, in a creative sense. With a novel, you stay strictly indoors, but with all the accompanying pleasures of that. With a play, you get to go out of doors, you get to roam more freely. With a screenplay, you’re on Mars – if it’s a Will Smith film. Oh, excuse me, that’s right, it’s just another Earth…

10)  What are you working on now? Have you any near future publication dates for fans?

It’s been an exciting year. I’ve been directing a feature, a very unique Hollywood biopic – “Near Myth: The Oskar Knight Story.” The film stars Lenny Von Dohlen (“Twin Peaks,” “Tender Mercies”), Oscar winner Margaret O’Brien, Joaquim de Almeida, Julianna Guill, Rudolf Martin, Kristina Anapau, Lawrence Pressman. And Lenny Von Dohlen is amazing as “Oskar Knight.” He really does the man justice. Watch for the movie later next year. To come full circle, “Dial L for Latch-Key” has just been released as “Dial L for Latch-Key: The Radio Play.” It’s available in both digital and CD formats from Blackstone Audio.  The play is performed by the By The Time I Get To Tucson Players – Phil Gordon, Colleen Zandbergen, Jesus Limon, Brian Levario, and Douglas Grant. It’s quite witty fun. I don’t want to overstate it, but these actors would keep even Ralph Fiennes on his toes. Plus we recorded it at the JTG Studios in Tucson. Let’s see Ralph match that.

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“Dial L for Latch-Key” at Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Dial-L-Latch-Key-Scott-Fivelson/dp/098346040X

http://www.downpour.com/dial-l-for-latch-key-145461

“Leading the Witness” at Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Leading-Witness-Scott-Fivelson/dp/1937890139/ref=la_B00F8ZL39E_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1382724416&sr=1-7

“A Farewell to Legs” audiobook at Hen House Press website:

http://www.loveandpublishing.com/Farewell.htm

“Tuxes” (novel) at Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Tuxes-Scott-Fivelson/dp/0978982215/ref=la_B00F8ZL39E_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1382724551&sr=1-4

“American Reel” (film) at  Amazon and MVD Visual:

http://www.souldogs.com/AmericanReel/

Her Grace in Disgrace by Claudia Harbaugh (28th Oct)

Her Grace in DisgraceHer Grace in Disgrace by Claudia Harbaugh

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This review is based on a free copy of the book sent to me by the author. Her Grace in Disgrace is a historical romance, I really loved this book, there were so many great characters both upstairs and down. I felt part of the book and eagerly wanted to know how situations would develop. It even taught me new words which are no longer used today, but fascinated me. Isobel evolved into a lovely lady whom I’m sure will go on to impress us with her good works in the next instalment where we will continue to read about the Warwick Home for Widows. A really enjoyable read.
Find a copy of this book here from Amazon.

Claudia will be our guest author tomorrow on the blog, come back and find out more about her.

View all my reviews

Guest Author Serena Fairfax

My guest today is Serena Fairfax, please join me in welcoming Serena to the blog and let’s find out more about her.

serena_fairfax

1) Where is your home town?

London is my home and no one sings its praises better than Adele in  “Hometown Glory.”  Listen and hum along to it.

2)   How long have you been writing? What inspired you to pen your first book? 

Off and on for years.  I’d read some Mills & Boons and  tried my hand at it. Well, I never cracked the M&B nut although STRANGE INHERITANCE and PAINT ME A DREAM  were published by Robert Hale Ltd in its now defunct Rainbow Romance line.

3)  Tell us a bit about your childhood in India, have you worked any of your experiences into your writing?

My father was an international businessman (I fantasised that this was his cover story and that he was really a secret agent). Wherever in the world he was posted, we followed. We spent many enjoyable years in India  and as my mother was curious and gregarious we had  lots of friends from all backgrounds. Some of the incidents in WHERE THE BULBUL SINGS such as the suicide and the acid attack sprang from real life episodes. Then I was sent to boarding school in England (loved it- midnight feasts in the dorm with, dare I say, more than the odd tipple smuggled in, and inspiring teachers) followed by University where I read law and then qualified as a lawyer, which is still the day job.

4)  You’ve written 4 romances, there are so many sub-categories in this genre today where would you place each of your romances?

STRANGE INHERITANCE, PAINT ME A DREAM, GOLDEN GROVE and WILFUL FATE  (all  50,000 words) are what I categorise as light contemporary romances with a happy ever after ending.  Where THE BULBUL SINGS is contemporary women’s fiction (over 100,000 words) with a romance theme but essentially a story of a woman from the minority Anglo-Indian community who reinvents herself. IN THE PINK (45,000 words) isn’t a romance  but an entertainment.

5)  “Where the Bulbul Sings” is set in an Anglo-Indian community, what is a Bulbul?

A bulbul is an Indian songbird or, more romantically, nightingale. Bulbuls perch in Africa, Asia and as far north as Japan. They have short necks, long tails, wings are rounded and short and they vary in length from 13cms to 29cms.  They are highly vocal. Some bulbuls are rather drab whilst others have colourful plumage. Most bulbuls are monogamous but the yellow whiskered greenbul is polygamous!

6) How does the title reflect the story?

Ah, that’s for the reader to determine!

7) You’ve written another book “In the Pink” it is described as a wry comedy, tell us a little about the book and where the idea for the storyline came from.

A friend’s brief involvement with an NGO (non-governmental organisation) triggered the storyline and of course, I pumped it up and invented a lot of incidents and characters including the delightful Dame Marjorie Sandringham.

8) You are part of the “Romantic Novelists Association”, why is this a good group for aspiring romance writers to join?

It embraces a range of writer from newbies, the successful and still struggling and is supportive and encouraging to all. But what would be even better is if it were to go the extra mile to welcome to the membership, talented indie authors who haven’t before been published by traditional houses, thereby ending the unjustified bias against them. The local chapter meetings are a fun place to exchange ideas and the speakers give valuable tips on hot topics.

9) As an Indie Author, what marketing tools have worked well for you?

Marketing is 90% of an indie author’s work and is a hard slog but one mustn’t blush unseen. I give talks, appear at romance book fests (I’m participating in the Festival of Romance which is being held in November), blogging, guest posting, being interviewed on other writer’s blogs and joining writers’ groups. One never knows where it will lead.

10) Tell us about your latest book. Do you have a planned publication date?

My latest offspring is an erotic romance. I hope I’ve pulled it off (no pun intended). It’s scheduled for release as an ebook in December 2013.

Thanks so much, Rosie.

where_the_bulbul_sings_180For a direct link to this book click here for Amazon.co.uk

My books are available as ebooks on Amazon (USA and UK), Smashwords and the IBookstore.

Serena’s links:

Website     http://www.serenafairfax.com/

Blog : http://www.serenafairfax.com/serena_fairfax_author_blog/

Email:        info@serenafairfax.com

LinkedIn      http://uk.linkedin.com/pub/serena-fairfax/4a/852/a67

Twitter:      http://klout.com/user/Sefairfax?n=tw&v=connect_twitter

Facebook     http://www.facebook.com/serenafairfax

Amazon links:

STRANGE INHERITANCE (ASIN:B005KMVF34)

PAINT ME A DREAM (ASIN:B005LKMQZG)

GOLDEN GROVE (ASIN:B005JZ0RAO)

WHERE THE BULBUL SINGS  (ASIN:B0093MHTNM)

IN THE PINK (ASIN:B0051YFOTK)

WILFUL FATE (ASIN:B00802VMP2

Thanks for being my guest today Serena, and Good Luck with the next book.

My Year of doing good, May 12th-18th

Good deedsContinuing my attempts to follow in the foot steps of Judith O’Reilly after reading her book;

May 12th – Sent e-mails and texts to children of friends who are all starting their GCSE exams tomorrow. Signed up to follow several new blogs and new people on Twitter. Supported another author on Facebook and followed up a few more blog posts with comments. Visited my parents and caught up with their news. Remembered to send a birthday card to another relative. Sent out reminders to authors who will be appearing as guests on my blog this week, just to let them know that I haven’t forgotten them. Added money to my jam jar.

school sign 04 - smallMay 13th – My half morning of volunteering at a local school. Invited to go on a school trip with the baby class to a zoo, it’s causing me a huge dilemma, it’s got “Good Deed” written all over it, but it’s on a day that I usually work, so I would have to change my day, then it doesn’t fit with my own children’s activities, plus I know from experience that it is unlikely to be an easy trip. It boils down to how much do I want to do this good deed? I’ll have another think about it! Dropped off a card and present for a friends son.

May 14th – A busy work day for me, not much time for good deeds. Have made a batch of cookie dough ready to bake in the morning so that I can take cookies as a gift for a friend when I visit her for coffee. It’s raining today which gives me the ideal opportunity to empty my homemade compost on to the garden. I recycle all of my kitchen vegetable scraps and ferment them for my garden. There is a smelly downside, so for the sake of my neighbours and the family I try to spread it on the garden when the rain can wash it in. I know I should have dug around and found some gloves to wear, but I was being lazy. Phew!! I can smell my hands from the keyboard, think they need a fourth wash! (It’s all organic, it just stinks!)

May 15th – Baked my cookies and some cheese sables which I took with me on my visit to my friend. Picked up litter on my way home. Am trying to make a conscious effort to regularly check my spam mail after I found some “Guest Authors” had slipped through the net. Most spam is just that “rubbish” but I felt really bad when I stumbled upon people who had made an effort, only to have their message relegated to spam.

May 16th – Invited a friend out for coffee. Had a phone call from an 84 year old relative who needed help filling out a security form. She needed actual dates and places of birth of her parents, and as I hold the current family tree she came to me for the details. The need for pages of security details just so that she can continue a voluntary job which she has been doing for nearly 20 years has ruffled her feathers! Let me explain; Imagine an Edwardian style Lady in today’s society, we’re talking table manners and best behaviour, they call her “The Hat Lady” mixed with a mobile phone and her own independence. She’s been mistaken for the Queen, which is hilarious considering her voluntary job. She is a garden tour guide for HRH Prince Charles at his Highgrove garden estate. The security form went on to ask if she has ever been involved in espionage? (Well you’re not likely to admit it are you?) She’s not impressed with one or two other questions on the form, so someone in admin will be receiving a phone call from her today. Rather them than me!

jpeg GB flag

May 17th – Whilst digging through the Family tree file yesterday, I found more details on a 999 year lease which is being argued over at the moment. Spent another 2 hours surfing the net to find a solution. We (My Husband’s Family) need to prove ownership of a piece of land which a family member leased to St Mary Magdalene Church in 1793 in order to extend the churchyard. The lack of documentation is infuriating, we have a signed document but can’t prove where it was registered, I keep spending hours and getting lost in fascinating documents held by the National Archives, inching my way closer. Every time the entitlement gets passed down a generation there is trouble with the proof of ownership, there is a £22 per year rent which was worth loads at the start and will be worth nothing at the end, but it’s the land which is in Bermondsey, London which is today’s issue. There is a painfully slow and expensive investigation being done by the family solicitor, plus the local council transformed the closed church yard into a garden last year and they have stopped paying the rent. All a bit of a nightmare, good job I love history. The chance to do today’s Good Deed will be later as my name is down to help provide the cricket tea at my sons match. (Praying it’s not another freezing cold evening)

May 18th – A tired day today, my Good Deeds have been very minor, just keeping up with my cyber friends, supporting their blogs and tweets and writing book reviews. Sent out e-mails to guest authors who will be appearing on the blog next week. Keeping up the Good Deeds feels like a long up hill trudge today.

“P” AtoZ Challenge

This is the third and final book by Jean Fullerton on the challenge, Jean has been one of my guest authors http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-j0 and will be taking part in The Very British Blog Tour 2013.http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-dQ During the challenge we are asking everyone to PLEASE leave a comment, thanks.

Jean has given us some behind the scenes material about her book Perhaps Tomorrow;

Perhaps Tomorrow is set in Victorian East London- Jack the Ripper hunting ground. The heroine is Mattie Maguire, a young widow struggling to keep the family coal yard running and raise her young son. Enter Nathanial Tate recently escaped convict from Botany Bay. When he meets Mattie Nathaniel quickly realises the man he seeks Amos Stebbins also threatens Mattie but very soon Nathaniel’s quest to bring Amos Stebbins to justice take on a sinister twist.  Again the story is set in and around the impoverished streets of London’s dockland.

Product Details

Mattie Maguire is a twenty-six-year-old widow with an infant son. Since her husband, Brian, died three years before, she has struggled to keep the family’s East End coal business solvent, as well as taking care of her troubled mother-in-law. But unbeknown to Mattie, life is about to get even tougher. Maguire’s is in the path of the proposed Wapping to Mile End Railway extension that Amos Stebbins is trying to raise capital for, and he has his sights set on the deeds of the coal yard. Outwardly, Amos is a respectably married local benefactor. But he has a darker side and will stop at nothing to get what he wants. Nathaniel Tate is the son of a poor farmer who used to be employed by Amos as a clerk, until he was wrongfully convicted of embezzling money that Amos stole. Sent to a penal colony in Botany Bay, Sydney, Nathaniel escaped after receiving the news that his wife and children had died. Now he has returned to London, hell-bent on killing Amos, whom he holds responsible for his family’s destruction. Tracking Amos down to Maguire’s, a desperate and penniless Nathaniel accepts Mattie’s offer of work. But as Nathaniel begins to help Mattie turn around the fortunes of the business, and the pair grow ever closer, he starts to think less of revenge and more of the possibility of a future with Mattie. That is until a furious Amos reveals Nathaniel’s true identity to Mattie – and the police.

Buy Perhaps Tomorrow on Amazon http://www.amazon.co.uk/Perhaps-Tomorrow-ebook/dp/B004JHY6VY/ref=la_B002BOD3HA_1_5_bnp_1_kin?ie=UTF8&qid=1363721093&sr=1-5

Here is what one reader thought about the book;

I have been eagerly awaiting this third book by the very talented Jean Fullerton. I loved her first two books, No Cure For Love and A Glimpse at Happiness and this one is even better.
It has all the ingredients of a bestseller. A cracking story, totally authentic and historically accurate setting and her best hero to date. Nathaniel Tate lights up the page; he’s tough,resourceful, intelligent and totally scrumptious. He is an escaped convict (having been sent to Botany Bay)and has returned to seek revenge on the man who sent him there.
This man is Amos Stebbins. Stebbins is everything a villain should be; on the outside a pillar of society but actually totally corrupt.
Mattie Maguire is the perfect match for Nathaniel. She is running the coal yard that Stebbins is trying to obtain by deception, but is barely making ends meet. Nathaniel, of course, helps her turn round the fortunes of the business and the two of them fall in love.There are many exciting twists and turns before the two of them are safe from the machinations of the evil Stebbins.I was captivated from the very first page and sat up late two nights in a row in order to finish the book. I can’t recommend it highly enough. Now there is another long wait until her next book appears.
Here are 5 links to randomly chosen AtoZ Bloggers;

“C” on the AtoZ Challenge

Today I bring you the first of three books entered on the challenge by Jean Fullerton. Jean was recently a guest author on my blog http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-j0 and I am also being her host on The Very British Blog Tour 2013.http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-dQ As part of the challenge we are asking everyone to PLEASE leave a comment, thanks.

Call Nurse Millie is the entry for today’s challenge and we begin with an insight from Jean about her inspiration for the book;

Call Nurse Millie is set in post-WW2 East London and features Millie Sullivan a District Nurse and Midwife. Like everyone Millie is full of optimism at the end of hostilities and when she meets Alex Nolan she starts to look forward to a bright future.  As a qualified District Nurse I was fascinated by the equipment Millie would have used to nurse her patients. It combines my love of the area in London where I was born and raised with my own profession.

Product Details

Here is a little more description about the book;

It’s 1945 and, as the troops begin to return home, the inhabitants of London attempt to put their lives back together. For 25-year-old Millie, a qualified nurse and midwife, the jubilation at the end of the war is short-lived as she tends to the needs of the East End community around her. But while Millie witnesses tragedy and brutality in her job, she also finds strength and kindness. And when misfortune befalls her own family, it is the enduring spirit of the community that shows Millie that even the toughest of circumstances can be overcome.

Through Millie’s eyes, we see the harsh realities and unexpected joys in the lives of the patients she treats, as well as the camaraderie that is forged with the fellow nurses that she lives with. Filled with unforgettable characters and moving personal stories, this vividly brings to life the colourful world of a post-war East London.

Buy Call Nurse Millie on Amazon http://www.amazon.co.uk/Call-Nurse-Millie-ebook/dp/

Here are 4 randomly chosen blogs from other AtoZ Challengers;

http://fairbettysworld.blogspot.co.uk/

http://inthetesseract.blogspot.ca/

http://acitrusgroveinthesuburbs.blogspot.com.au/

http://unconventionallibrarian.com/

Guest Author Jean Fullerton

Today my guest on the blog is author Jean Fullerton, keep an eye out for more of Jean’s books as she will be appearing in my AtoZ Challenge during April. here are Jean’s replies to the guest author questions;

1) Tell me your name. Jean Fullerton
2) Where do you live? London England
3) When did you start writing? Eleven years ago.
4) What type of books do you like writing the most?
I write historical romances set in East London’s  Whitechapel area- Jack the Ripper Country with feisty heroines and heart-stopping heroes.

5)Pass on 3 tips about writing or publishing;

1 Write the stories you love
2 Learn your craft.
3 Stick at it.

6)What was the last book that you read? How would you rate it?

Lee Child’s “Die trying” 12 out of ten. Fabulous!

7)Now choose just one of your books and add a link to it.

Call Nurse Millie starts in 1945 as the troops begin to return home and the inhabitants of London attempt to put their lives back together. For 25-year-old Millie, a qualified nurse and midwife, the jubilation at the end of the war is short-lived as she tends to the needs of the East End community around her. But while Millie witnesses tragedy and brutality in her job, she also finds strength and kindness. And when misfortune befalls her own family, it is the enduring spirit of the community that shows Millie that even the toughest of circumstances can be overcome.
Through Millie’s eyes, we see the harsh realities and unexpected joys in the lives of the patients she treats, as well as the camaraderie that is forged with the fellow nurses that she lives with. Filled with unforgettable characters and moving personal stories, this vividly brings to life the colourful world of a post-war East London.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Call-Nurse-Millie-ebook/dp/B00BMUVRT0/ref=sr_1_1_bnp_1_kin?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1363121249&sr=1-1