Sunday Connection – Catch Up With This Week’s Blog Posts #SundayBlogShare

Catch Up With This Week’s Book Reviews and posts from the Blogosphere

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Monday – Eleanor reviewed fantasy The Last Dragon Rider by Errin Krystal

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Tuesday – Saw a book promo for Irish family romance That Summer At The Seahorse Hotel by Adrienne Vaughan

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Wednesday – Terry reviewed women’s fiction Bear Medicine by G Elizabeth Kretchmer

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Thursday – Noelle reviewed WW2 #PTSD Fred’s Funeral by Sandy Day

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Friday – Alison reviewed fantasy Keepers by Sacha Black

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and I reviewed fantasy romance River by India R Adams

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Saturday – Karen B reviewed suspense Maggie’s Revenge by Jacquie Biggar

Discussion Post – 40 Days Until She Dies, discussed Emily Barr’s book The Truth And Lies Of Ella Black

Posts from around the blogosphere

Tips for debut authors

http://terrytyler59.blogspot.co.uk/2018/02/miscellaneous-tips-for-debut-writers-2.html

Writing stuck?

http://writersinthestormblog.com/2018/02/a-simple-tip-to-help-get-rid-of-saggy-middles/

How to run a Goodreads Giveaway

https://dehaggerty.wordpress.com/2018/02/07/how-to-do-a-goodreads-giveaway-writerwednesday-goodreads-giveaway/

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Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT #WW1 #PTSD Novella Fred’s Funeral by @sandeetweets

Today’s team review is from Noelle, she blogs here http://saylingaway.wordpress.com

#RBRT Review Team

Noelle has been reading Fred’s Funeral by Sandy Day

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Fred’s Funeral is a novella by Sandy Day, inspired by hundreds of letters written by the author’s Great Uncle Fred, but a wonderful concoction of her imagination.

Fred Sadler has just died in his room in a hospital for the mentally ill. He sees his cousin and his brother and a whole family of those who died before him, congregating on the other side of an ethereal divide. The problem is, he can’t cross the divide. He finds himself – or at least his consciousness – watching from the ceiling of his room, as his priggish sister-in-law, Viola, and her brother, Thomas, open his one possession, an old battered suitcase. It is Viola who gives her interpretation of Fred’s life based on old memories and the contents of the suitcase.

As they paw through his belongings, Fred is shocked to find Viola’s version of the events of his life is not as he remembers it. Why had he spent so many years locked up in Whitby Hospital for the Insane?

As Fred moves through his funeral and the gathering of the family afterward, and between his memories and the pronouncements of Viola and others, we learn that the young Fred went off to fight in World War I and came back damaged: addicted to binge drinking, constantly angry and full of anxieties. At that time, Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome was not recognized, and the remainder of his life was consumed by his trying to govern his emotions and fit in, his family’s attempts to provide and adjust for him, and finally, his placement in the hospital. We are reminded of the barbarity of the so-called modern treatments for patients at that time in such institutions.

What I particularly liked about this story are the ways different people look at the same events, and the ability to see how his confusion, frustration, and mental breakdown – now so understandable – were met with misunderstanding by his family. Fred desperately wants to gain control of his life, to spend his life in the home and with the family he so values, but can’t help pushing them away.  The reader can feel his angst and understand his actions, but at the same time see themselves in the family’s shoes. The author does a wonderful job of describing family relationships and deep-seated feelings.

This is a short, but very profound read.

Book description

Fred Sadler has just died of old age. It’s 1986, seventy years after he marched off to WWI, and the ghost of Fred Sadler hovers near the ceiling of the nursing home. To Fred’s dismay, the arrangement of his funeral falls to his prudish sister-in-law, Viola. As she dominates the remembrance of Fred, he agonizes over his inability to set the record straight.

Was old Uncle Fred really suffering from shell shock? Why was he locked up most of his life in the Whitby Hospital for the Insane? Could his family not have done more for him?

Fred’s memories of his life as a child, his family’s hotel, the War, and the mental hospital, clash with Viola’s version of events as the family gathers on a rainy October night to pay their respects.

About the author

Sandy Day is the author of Poems from the Chatterbox and Fred’s Funeral. She graduated from Glendon College, York University, with a degree in English Literature sometime in the last century. Sandy spends her summers in Jackson’s Point, Ontario on the shore of Lake Simcoe. She winters nearby in Sutton by the Black River. Sandy is a trained facilitator for the Toronto Writers Collective’s creative writing workshops. She is a developmental editor and book coach.

Sandy Day

Goodreads | AmazonUK | AmazonUS

Sunday Connection – What’s Been Happening This Week? #Blogging #SundayBlogShare

Catch up With This Week’s Book Reviews.

Then Follow The Links To Posts From Around The Blogosphere

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Monday – I reviewed romantic suspense The Obsession by Nora Roberts

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Tuesday – Noelle reviewed Victorian romance The Viscount And The Vicar’s Daughter by Mimi Matthews

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Wednesday – Robbie reviewed WW1 survivor’s tale Fred’s Funeral by Sandy Day

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Thursday – I reviewed contemporary The Things We Don’t Say by Roberta R Carr

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Friday – It was my turn on the blog tour with a review for paranormal thriller The Doll Funeral by Kate Hamer

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Saturday – I reviewed novella and paranormal romance Confessions Of A Pirate Ghost by Jo-Ann Carson

Fun posts

Tuesday Teaser – from thriller The Intruder by P.S. Hogan

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What am I reading? For WWW Wednesday

Plus links from around the Blogosphere

Ever wanted to write a memoir?

https://blog.reedsy.com/how-to-write-a-memoir/

Advice about querying publishing agents

https://lyndseyhallblog.wordpress.com/2018/01/18/in-the-query-trenches-author-toolbox-blog-hop/

Book Blogger Etiquette: How To Get Comments

http://avalinahsbooks.space/book-blogger-get-comments/

The One Thing That Will Kill Book Sales Dead—And 10 Ways to Avoid it.

http://annerallen.com/2018/01/kill-book-sales-10-ways/

Fanna’s post supports fellow book bloggers

https://fannatality.wordpress.com/2018/01/25/discussion-book-bloggers-a-publicity-team-that-should-be-respected-oh-and-theyre-free-for-an-unlimited-time/

Shannon discusses expanding  the YA & NA genres

https://shannonathompson.com/2018/01/27/na-or-ya-college-aged-protagonists/

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT Robbie reviews #WW1 #PTSD Fred’s Funeral by @sandeetweets

Today’s team review is from Robbie, she blogs here https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Robbie has been reading Fred’s Funeral by Sandy Day

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My review

Fred has just died in his small room in a hospital for the mentally ill. Fred finds himself a ghost, stuck between this life and the next and forced to watch his prissy sister-in-law, Viola, arrange his funeral. Fred seems tied to Viola and his brother, Thomas, and watches on, silent and powerless, as his life is rehashed by Viola to his relatives after the funeral. Viola’s version of the events of his life are unfavourable and cause Fred to think back to recollections of these same events.

Fred went off, as a young man, to fight in World War 1 and came back damaged and unable to manage to do the usual things in life such as hold down a job, get married and raise a family. Post his combat years, Fred suffers from huge anxiety and fear and this manifest itself in his binge drinking and uncontrolled behavior and angry outbursts. This condition is commonly known as “shell shock” or post-traumatic stress disorder (“PTSD”).

The author gives some interesting insights into the character of Fred as she provides his version of events and describes beautifully his confusion and frustration with himself as he finds himself unable to control his anxiety and the resultant behavior. Fred continuously feels that he is right on the edge of regaining control of his life.

His father shipping him off to a hospital for the insane puts Fred on the sad path to complete misery and metal collapse as he is removed from the home environment that he values and longs for. His brother is not convinced that the mental hospital is the best place for Fred but his doesn’t have the strength of character to stand up to his wife and father.

A well penned story of a man’s struggle to overcome PTSD against the overwhelming prejudice and misunderstanding of the time as well as the horrific treatments imposed on mental patients in hospitals.

I rated this book four stars out of five.

Book description

Fred Sadler has just died of old age. It’s 1986, seventy years after he marched off to WWI, and the ghost of Fred Sadler hovers near the ceiling of the nursing home. To Fred’s dismay, the arrangement of his funeral falls to his prudish sister-in-law, Viola. As she dominates the remembrance of Fred, he agonizes over his inability to set the record straight.

Was old Uncle Fred really suffering from shell shock? Why was he locked up most of his life in the Whitby Hospital for the Insane? Could his family not have done more for him?

Fred’s memories of his life as a child, his family’s hotel, the War, and the mental hospital, clash with Viola’s version of events as the family gathers on a rainy October night to pay their respects.

About the author

Sandy Day is the author of Poems from the Chatterbox and Fred’s Funeral. She graduated from Glendon College, York University, with a degree in English Literature sometime in the last century. Sandy spends her summers in Jackson’s Point, Ontario on the shore of Lake Simcoe. She winters nearby in Sutton by the Black River. Sandy is a trained facilitator for the Toronto Writers Collective’s creative writing workshops. She is a developmental editor and book coach.

Sandy Day

Goodreads | AmazonUK | AmazonUS