“X” on the AtoZ Challenge

With the last 3 letters of the AtoZ Challenge to go, I bring you the letter “X”. XO: A Kathryn Dance Thriller by Jeffery Deaver. I previously read The Blue Nowhere by Jeffery and reviewed it here on the blog http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-ga Please add a comment below after you’ve read this post because it’s all part of the challenge, thanks.

Kayleigh Towne is a beautiful and successful singer-songwriter, and Edwin Sharp is her biggest fan. When she replies to one of his fan letters with ‘XO’, Edwin is convinced she loves him, and that her latest hit song ‘Your Shadow’ was written for him. Nothing Kayleigh or her lawyers can say persuades him otherwise.
Then the singer gets an anonymous phone call; it’s the first verse of ‘Your Shadow’ playing. Soon after, one of the crew is horribly murdered. Kayleigh’s friend Kathryn Dance, a special agent with the California Bureau of Investigation, knows that stalking crimes are not one-off occurrences, and, sure enough, more verses of the song are played as warnings of death to follow. With a little help from forensic criminalist Lincolyn Rhyme, Dance must use her kinesic and investigative skills in an attempt to find the killer before more people die.
Deaver has written the actual song, ‘Your Shadow’. Readers will be able to download it from http://www.jefferydeaver.com.
XO (Kathryn Dance, #3)

One reader thought this about the book;

XO twists and turns and never disappoints. I finished the book in less than a day. Deaver is the master of the art of plotting stories of personal terror. His characters are complex, his dialogue is simple, and his pacing is perfect.

Here are my 4 randomly chosen links to other Ato Z bloggers, please go check them out too;

http://treadmillconfessions.wordpress.com/

http://candidcanine.blogspot.co.uk/

http://kyoticrafts.blogspot.co.uk/

http://worldofortix.blogspot.co.uk/

20 Million pieces of personal info sold online

A shocking report in Wednesdays Daily Telegraph by Katherine Rushton advises that the illegal sale of personal information used on the internet is increasing at alarming rates. 20 million pieces of information such as credit card numbers, passwords, bank details and dates of birth were sold in the first six months of this year. This is 4 times the amount for the same period in 2010.

It mirrors the rise in people entering their details on-line to settle utility bills, pay for holidays or order goods online. Companies and banks urge consumers to take care to protect their details.

Three fifths of users leave websites by closing windows rather than logging out.

More than one-quarter of people never look for the padlock sign in the top right corner of the page.

Hackers sell your information from credit cards on the black market for up to $30/£18 a piece or more depending on your credit limit. Passwords for e-mail accounts fetch $20 while bank account numbers go for $10 – $1000.

One in six Britons open “Spam” e-mails, one in fifty click on the links in them!

Don’t be a victim!