Rosie’s Review Team #RBRT DCI Jones Casebook: Cryer’s View by @KerryJDonovan #SundayBlogShare

Today’s team review is from E.L Lindley, she blogs at http://lindleyreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

#RBRT Review Team

E.L. has been reading DCI Jones Casebook: Cryer’s View by Kerry J Donovan

32738530

Cryer’s View by Kerry J Donovan is the fourth story in the DCI Jones Casebook series. It is an exciting police thriller centred around the character of Phil Cryer.

From the onset it is clear that Donovan is a safe pair of hands and the story is both engaging and gripping. There are references to incidents and characters that have obviously featured in the earlier novels but Cryer’s View can be very much enjoyed as a standalone story. Indeed it is the only one of Donovan’s books that I’ve read although it certainly won’t be the last.

The structure of the novel lends the story an added layer of tension as it is set out almost like a police report with each chapter chronologically dated. The whole case takes just over a month to solve which heightens the sense of urgency. Donovan also uses devices such as watching the action play out via TV screens which again lends authenticity and makes the story seem more visual, almost like a TV serial. Donovan switches from third person narrative which allows him to move the action forward to first person which creates a connection between the reader and Phil Cryer.

There are lots of likeable characters in this novel but Phil Cryer is at the heart of it. By giving us a character who is ‘ordinary’ rather than a larger than life hero, Donovan makes us believe in Cryer. He’s a Detective Sergeant based in Birmingham whose only extraordinary feature is his exceptional memory which makes him the perfect choice for an undercover job in London, rooting out a corrupt cop. Just as important as his abilities as a detective, Cryer is a devoted family man which humanises him. He also expresses his fears and insecurities as he feels isolated in a big city away from home. The fact that he feels out of his depth makes the reader connect with him and care about him.

In addition to Cryer’s mission to expose the “bent cop”, he has to play the role of newbie in the National Crime Agency. Taking on cases he has to underplay his memory and abilities, enabling others to take the credit for his investigations. He gains the nickname “Lucky” and wins over his colleagues with the exception of Billy Hook who becomes his nemesis. Their relationship provides much of the tension during the course of the story.

Donovan’s skill as a writer is apparent in the way he allows his story to unfold piece by piece, almost like a jigsaw puzzle. There are quite a few red herrings which build the excitement and the big reveal at the end left me reeling as I never saw it coming.

Donavan uses his novel to present a very realistic and sympathetic view of law enforcement agencies. His knowledge of police procedures is convincing and the story is all the more interesting for it. Reading the story made me appreciate what a dangerous job police work is and how vulnerable they are. We are also shown how political the job can be and the tensions between detective work and the CPS who don’t always choose to prosecute.

I really enjoyed Cryer’s View, it’s pure escapism but with a thoughtful underbelly. If you like a character driven thriller with lots of action then this one will suit you.

Book description

The explosive fourth instalment in the DCI Jones Casebook series of crime thrillers—this is CRYER’S VIEW. 
For more than five years police operations in the southeast of England have been failing. Chief Superintendent Knightly, a senior member of the National Crime Agency, suspects that someone is selling police intelligence. When one of his junior officers dies before he can attend clandestine meeting with him, Knightly is certain—there’s a dirty cop inside his organisation.
Unable to trust anyone under his command, Knightly turns to an old friend for help—Detective Chief Inspector David Jones.
When Detective Sergeant Phil Cryer, answers his doorbell to find CS Knightly and DCI Jones on his doorstep, he knows things are about to get interesting—and dangerous. 
Phil Cryer, on sick leave after suffering an injury in the line of duty, soon finds himself deep undercover inside the NCA hunting the dirty cop, codename Alpine. He faces his most difficult and dangerous assignment. 
Alone, injured, and armed only with his phenomenal memory, Phil must identify the rogue cop before he escapes … or kills again. 

About the author

Kerry J. Donovan

Internationally bestselling fiction author, Kerry was born in Dublin. He spent most of his life in the UK, and now lives in the heart of rural Brittany with his wonderful and patient wife, Jan. They have three children and four grandchildren (so far), all of whom live in England. An absentee granddad, Kerry is hugely thankful for the advent of video calling.
The cottage is a pet free zone (apart from the field mice, moles, and red squirrels).
Kerry earned a first class honours degree in Human Biology, and has a PhD in Sport and Exercise Sciences. A former scientific advisor to The Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, he helped UK emergency first-responders prepare for chemical attacks in the wake of 9/11. This background adds a scientific edge to his writing. He is also a former furniture designer/maker.
 

Goodreads | AmazonUK | AmazonUS | Twitter

 

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT DARK FRAGMENTS by @RSinclairAuthor #Thriller #TuesdayBookBlog

Today’s team review is from Georgia, she blogs here http://www.georgiarosebooks.com

#RBRT Review Team

Georgia has ben reading Dark Fragments by Rob Sinclair

32745377

 

There are likeable and unlikeable characters in fiction and Ben Stephens is one of the latter, although it wasn’t always that way for me. At the beginning of his story we meet a family man who dotes on his children and loves his wife.

Quite rightly Ben is still grieving the death of his first wife, Alice, the love of his life, who, now being dead, is lifted up to the level of sainthood which must be difficult for the second wife, Gemma, with whom he was having an affair while Alice was alive. And it is here that the first of the cracks starts to appear.

When Dani, Ben’s estranged twin sister who is a detective and was Alice’s best friend turns up out of the blue and starts asking questions the strain deepens. Ben works for Gemma’s father which is another source of pressure and he has also become involved with a local gangster in some dubious business venture and now owes him a lot of money.

The initial sympathy I had for Ben didn’t last long as he began to show his true colours. He makes some terrible decisions and it soon becomes apparent that he does whatever suits him, no matter what the cost to others.

Throughout the story there are chapters where Ben is talking to someone else and these conversations clearly show his lack of taking responsibility for his own actions, blaming everything and everyone around him for the situation he finds himself in.

This is a fast moving and suitably violent thriller which I highly recommend.

I received a free copy of this book from the author but this has not influenced my review one iota.

Book Description

Dark Fragments: an edge of your seat thriller from the best-selling author of The Enemy Series

Murder. Money. Revenge.

Outwardly, Ben Stephens appears to be a normal, hard-working family man. In reality, his life has been in turmoil since the murder of his wife, Alice, seven years ago. The killer was never caught.

Now re-married – to the woman he was having an affair with while still married to Alice – Ben’s life is once again spiralling out of control, and he’s become heavily indebted to an unscrupulous criminal who is baying for Ben’s blood.

When Ben’s estranged twin sister, a police detective, unexpectedly returns to his life, asking too many questions for comfort, it becomes clear that without action, Ben’s life will soon reach a crisis point from which there will be no return.

In order to avoid falling further into the mire, Ben must examine the past if he is to survive the present – but just how much pressure can one man take before he breaks?

Dark Fragments is a fast-paced thriller with a blend of mystery, suspense and action that will appeal to readers of psychological thrillers, as well as a broad section of crime, thriller and action fans. If you like authors like Mark Edwards, Robert Bryndza and C.L. Taylor you will love this unforgettable thriller.

About the author

Rob Sinclair

Rob is the author of the critically acclaimed and bestselling Enemy series of espionage thrillers featuring embattled agent Carl Logan.

His explosive debut, Dance with the Enemy, was published in 2014 and introduced the world to the enigmatic Carl Logan. The second novel in the series, Rise of the Enemy, was released in April 2015 with the third, Hunt for the Enemy, released in February 2016. 

His latest thriller, the pulsating Dark Fragments, was released by Bloodhound Books in November 2016.

Rob began writing in 2009 following a promise to his wife, an avid reader, that he could pen a ‘can’t put down’ thriller. He worked for nearly 13 years for a global accounting firm after graduating from The University of Nottingham in 2002, specialising in forensic fraud investigations at both national and international levels. Rob now writes full time.

Originally from the North East of England, Rob has lived and worked in a number of fast paced cities, including New York, and is now settled in the West Midlands with his wife and young sons.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS | Goodreads | Twitter

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT FACE VALUE by @IanAndrewAuthor #Thriller #fridayreads

Today’s Team review is from E.L. Lindley, she blogs at http://lindleyreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

#RBRT Review Team

E.L has been reading Face Value by Ian Andrew

Face Value by Ian Andrew is a crime thriller which introduces readers to the Wright and Tran series. It’s an intriguing novel with lots of action, driven by strong, believable female characters.

Kara Wright and Tien Tran are partners in a private investigation agency. They are also best friends who met whilst serving as part of a special ops’ team within the military. They both have their own skill set, Kara is more outgoing and handles the client side of the business whereas Tien is a technological whizz. Both characters however are tough, intelligent and not the kind of women you would want to cross. In fact the novel opens with Kara making short work of a would-be rapist in a quite spectacular fashion, involving little more than a red stiletto heeled shoe.

I have to confess that Andrew had me at the shoe but he kept my interest throughout with his well crafted mystery. The story begins when the adult children of Chris and Brenda Sterling recruit Kara and Tien to track their parents’ whereabouts. The problem is, to all intents and purposes, the Sterlings have simply taken off on a holiday to Florida. As the plot unfolds, however, it becomes increasingly apparent that this is not the case and Kara and Tien find themselves drawn into the murky world of a Russian criminal.

Andrew makes his novel even more exciting by structuring it so that Kara and Tien’s investigation is interspersed with the investigation of the police who are searching for the killer of the aforementioned would-be rapist. The two storylines collide dramatically towards the end in a very satisfying finale.

There is much to recommend this novel, not least the central characters themselves. Kara is no-nonsense and forthright with a sharp sense of humour and whilst Tien may be quieter and happy take a back seat, she is no less ballsy. We learn that her military career ended when she lost her hand during a daring rescue mission. A mission that saw her awarded the military cross for bravery.

The military is very much present in this book as Kara and Tien draw on the support of other former military personnel. They are presented as a tight network and Andrew captures the banter between them perfectly. The way the characters use jokes to counteract the danger make the relationships seem authentic.

My favourite thing about this novel is the way that Andrew allows women to shine in what is traditionally viewed as a man’s world. In addition to Kara and Tien there are lots of strong female characters making up both military and police roles. Even the toughest of the villains is a Russian woman called Emilia. It is telling that whilst interrogating her, Kara calls to mind a maxim from 1970s anti-terrorism training – “Kill the women fighters first for they are the most vicious, the most hard line, the least likely to surrender.”

The way in which Andrew chooses to conclude his novel places Kara and Tien in a position to move into a new and exciting direction in the future. He has set up his series very effectively with lots of likeable characters who I for one want to see more of. If you like action packed crime with a strong military flavour then you should give Face Value a try.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com also available free from Kindle Unlimited

 

 

 

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT THE BLUE RIDGE PROJECT by @NeilRochford #Thriller

Today’s team review is from Suzanne, she blogs at https://suzannerogersonfantasyauthor.wordpress.com/

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Suzanne has been reading The Blue Ridge Project by Neil Rochford

30112294

Blurb
Detective Andrea Nox is investigating a bizarre and violent murder-suicide with far-reaching consequences, both for Beacon City and the people who run it. But all she has to show for her efforts so far are nonsensical clues and dead ends.
Then, there’s another murder.
Journalist Robert Duncan is visiting home after a personal crisis when the unthinkable happens and he unearths long-kept secrets about his family and his place within it. Before long, he is going back over an old story that implicates powerful people in horrible crimes, drawing him deeper into a dangerous and widespread conspiracy he wishes he had no part in.
Frank Mortimer, disturbed son of a wealthy and influential family, has no interest in conspiracies. He only wants to take part in an experimental program that promises to make him ‘better.’ However, with the shadowy and powerful group known only as The Project pulling the strings behind the program, what he is getting better at could prove disastrous for everyone else, as a dangerous power is being unlocked inside him…
Their paths will converge in murder, intrigue and a clandestine experiment that threatens to change the world itself. Discover the secrets behind The Blue Ridge Project
My review
First thoughts – I was intrigued by the blurb and as I started reading the book immediately felt different to the usual detective stories.
Characters – In the beginning there are too many characters to keep track of. It keeps you on your toes because you never know which character will play a part or is the next victim. That kept things interesting, but also made it hard to form an attachment to any of the characters.
Style – Part one is present day and then part two switches back to events that happened in the past. This second part is where the story came together for me and where I got a better understanding for the characters.
Final thoughts – Towards the end a lot of things that I had been wondering about were explained (I won’t say too much in case of spoilers). I thought it was cleverly written and I am definitely intrigued enough to continue with the series.
Recommend to – Those who like crime thrillers with a touch of something different.
Rating – 4 / 5 stars
Check out the book for yourself on Amazon UK   Amazon US  or   Goodreads

Rosie’s #Bookreview team #RBRT SILENCED JUSTICE by @JBroadmeadow #Crime #Thriller

Today’s team review is from Alison, she blogs here, http://alisonwilliamswriting.wordpress.com/

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Alison has been reading Silenced Justice by Joe Broadmeadow

25713769

I reviewed ‘Silenced Justice’ for Rosie’s Book Review Team.

First of all, I have to say that I do admire the knowledge that the author has bought to this book. It is well-researched and the complicated plot is well-developed. It’s fast-paced, and exciting, and the idea behind the story is sound, with real potential to be a fantastically compelling read. The plot surrounding Darnell Grey, in particular, could really be made into something special; and the flashbacks to a previous time, and the language used here, while unsettling at times, was a somewhat timely reminder of the racism often inherent in the system – a racism that clouds judgement and can result in some pretty horrific things.

That said, there are too many issues with the writing itself. Most of these issues are around dialogue. It seems extremely contrived at times, often used exclusively for dumping information. It’s also often stilted and too formal– simple devices like using contractions when writing the dialogue could have made things sound more natural and made the manuscript more polished. There are also a smattering of complicated dialogue tags that detract from the narrative and, again, seem forced and contrived. The dialogue seems to be trying far too hard to fit into some idea of how the characters should speak to each other – it overplays the banter and becomes something of a parody of itself.

The author also uses quite an odd structure when writing dialogue, as in these examples:

“Can you drop my car off for an oil change?” putting on her suit jacket and picking up her briefcase.

“Glad you know that. I gotta run, call you later,” kissing him on the cheek.

“I am getting better,” arms folded across her chest.

I found this completely irritating, if I’m honest. I don’t know why the author has chosen to write in this way, but it doesn’t work.

Another issue for me was that I hadn’t read the previous novel and I was very unsure for a long time exactly who everyone was and what their relationship was to each other. It is difficult to get this right when you’re writing a series, but it’s important that writers do get it right, not only for new readers but for readers of the first book who might have forgotten what happened previously.

So, unfortunately this book didn’t work for me. I can see that the author, and his stories, have potential. But the writing needs a really good polish.

Three out of five stars.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

 

 

 

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT NEED TO FIND YOU by @josephsouza3 #Crime #Thriller

Today’s Team review is from Terry she blogs at http://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Terry has been reading Need To Find You by Joseph Souza.

29247769

Review: Need to Find You by Joseph Souza

3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 on Amazon

Reviewed by me as a member of Rosie Amber’s Review Team

This was a strange one for me; I went from not being that keen to liking it, to not liking it and back to thinking it was perhaps rather terrific, all the way through.

It’s a crime thriller, starring the tough and damaged Yasmine, two cops, and a sinister underworld figure.  The cops, Whip Billings and Philip Haskins, are so well done, and I enjoyed reading their sections, even if the characters did walk straight out of Standard Fictional Detectives Ltd: wouldn’t you love to see one who isn’t a struggling ex-alcoholic/hampered by emotional demons/possessed of a need to execute his duties in a maverick fashion?  But Souza has painted them beautifully, stereotypes or not; I really liked Whip, and his father was very real, too.  Yasmine, not so convincing.

The plot is great, though at the beginning I was bothered by the stilted fashion of the narrative. Short sentences, delivering statements or pieces of information in a flat manner.  One that stuck out: ‘..he stared up at a water stain on the ceiling.  He thought it resembled a tattered catcher’s mitt.  Could have read more smoothly as something like: ‘he stared up at the catcher’s mitt of a water stain on the ceiling.  Okay, that might seem a bit nit-picking, and it seems fine on its own, but when whole pages are written like this it feels a bit wooden.  I felt the narrative could have done with another re-write, with the author looking at each sentence and considering if it could be made to read better.

Once the dialogue started the whole novel loosened up and it went from being ‘okay’ to ‘oh good, I’m enjoying this now; the dialogue is spot on, all the way through, sharp, convincing, and just right for the genre, which is so important, but then I’d come across someone being ‘sprawled in the foetal position’, which is surely a contradiction in terms, or lines like ‘he pulled up his chair in an avuncular manner’; the prose tended towards wordy without being descriptive, at times.  Then the day would be saved by lovely observations like this one, in which Whip imagines his romantic successor: ‘He imagined Dana to be one of those soft-spoken guys with a gentle disposition and a weak handshake.  A ponytailed dude who liked to hike in his Birkenstocks, carrying a hand-carved walking stick that he’d made in his workshop.  Asshole!‘. Loved that!

The story centres around the hidden journals of a famous writer, Robert Cornish, and here was something else that bothered me.  Cornish is supposed to be a writer of such acclaim that his works are studied by literature students, yet the quotes from him at the start of each chapter were banal quips.

Once I’d read the book I had a look at the reviews to see what others thought of it, as I always do, and most of them are positive.  Although I disliked some aspects, the best is very, very good, and I’d read something else by this author.  Despite the moderate star rating, I’d recommend it for those who like this sort of novel.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

 

 

 

BABY’S GOT BLUE EYES by LM Krier @tottielimejuice #Crime #Thriller @BrookCottageBks #fridayreads

Here’s a #fridayreads #BookBlitz

 

160521_BGBE_13

Genre: Crime thriller > serial killer

Release Date: Feb 2015

Someone is dumping bodies on DI Ted Darling’s patch and he’s not happy. Ted’s a good solid copper, in an old-fashioned way, with an excellent clear-up rate. He’s not at all like your average cop and has his own unique way of dealing with any prejudice his differences bring him. No heavy drinking, no failed marriage, just a steady, long-term relationship. He and his partner have cats, not kids. But this serial killer seems to be running effortless rings round Ted and his team. Every promising lead just takes them up another frustrating blind alley. Then it starts to get personal …

BUY LINK

http://hyperurl.co/kbmj37

ABOUT L.M.KRIER

141117_Me

Retired journalist, freelance copywriter and copy editor Lesley Tither writes under various pen names for different genres. Already well known for travel memoirs as Tottie Limejuice, Lesley also writes crime fiction under the name L M Krier.

Lesley’s first crime thriller, ‘Baby’s Got Blue Eyes’, was published in February 2015, followed by ‘Two Little Boys’ in June 2015. Books 3 and 4 in the DI Ted Darling series, ‘When I’m Old and Grey’ and ‘Shut Up and Drive’ are now available and Book 5 in the series will appear later in 2016.

“Sell the Pig” is the first in a series of travel memoirs describing how Lesley, writing as Tottie Limejuice, decided to make the move from the UK to France to start a new life, taking with her an 89-year-old mother suffering from vascular dementia. The story continues in three further books, ‘Is That Billinge Lump?’, ‘Mother, Was It Worth It?’ and ‘Biff the Useless Mention’. A fifth book in the ‘Sell the Pig’ series is scheduled for release later in 2016.

Her first children’s fiction book, writing as L M Kay, will be published later in 2016. ‘The Dog with the Golden Eyes’ is an exciting children’s crime thriller. Lesley also writes under the collective pen name of Jilli Lime-Holt, together with authors Jill Pennington and Janet Holt. Their first joint book, Take Three Birds, was published in December 2014.

Lesley is a former journalist, working as both a criminal court and coroner’s court reporter. She also worked as a case tracker for the Crown Prosecution Service, and for a firm investigating irregularities in offshore finance. Her other jobs have included owning and running a holiday riding centre and acting as a ‘charity mugger’, lying in wait to sign up shoppers for a wildlife charity. Lesley’s interests centre around nature and wildlife and encompass dogs, wild camping and organic gardening. She lives in the Auvergne region of Central France and holds dual French/British nationality. Her current dogs are two rescued border collies.

Babys Got Blue Eyes Tour Banner

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LMKrier/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/tottielimejuice

Goodreads Author Page: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/13476159.L_M_Krier

Blog: http://tottielimejuice.com/category/latest-news/

Website: http://tottielimejuice.com/

GIVEAWAY

Signed first edition of Baby’s Got Blue Eyes
a Rafflecopter giveaway

BCB-Host Button-200

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT TRUST ME by Earl Javorsky #TuesdayBookBlog @TheStoryPlant

Today’s Team Review is from Terry, she blogs at http://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Terry has been reading Trust Me by Earl Javorsky

25246566

TRUST ME by Earl Javorsky

4.5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed by me as a member of Rosie Amber’s Review Team

Trust Me is a well written and cleverly plotted crime/murder thriller set in and around Los Angeles. The main character is Jeff Fenner, a heavy drinker and jaded coke/LSD dealer whose life is imploding as his addictions wear him out, and one piece of bad luck follows another. Running alongside is the story of deeply troubled Holly, who gets involved with SOL, the ‘Save Our Life’ organisation that purports to solve problems of addiction and psychological blocks by way of finding one’s ‘inner child’. At an SOL meeting she meets the mysterious Art Bradley.

Ron, a journalist, befriends Jeff; he is helping his cop mate Joe to solve a series of suicides-that-might-be-murders. Soon, the links to all storylines become clear—and there’s a great twist at the beginning of Chapter 27, at 44%; didn’t expect that at all, even though I had my suspicions…

I loved the character of Jeff, and Ron was another favourite; Art Bradley was scarily sinister from the off. Aside from the highly readable story, I liked the way that this book was amusingly scathing about New Age self-help psychobabble, and the comments about the unreliability of the field of mental health, and how doctors and psychiatrists dish out one medication to counteract the side effects of another, and then another, and another.

I haven’t got anything negative to say about this novel; it held my interest throughout, ends well, and isn’t predictable. For me, it just missed the spark that sends a book into the ‘5*, I loved it’ zone, but that’s only personal taste; it’s jolly good, I’d recommend it, and I’d definitely read more by this author.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

 

 

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT THE DANCE OF DIMITRIOS by @PatrickBrigham #Crime #Thriller

Today’s team review is from Babus, she blogs here http://ajoobacatsblog.wordpress.com

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Babus has been reading The Dance Of Dimitrios by Patrick Brigham

28793410

When a body of a woman is found in the river, local Greek police file it as the death of a Muslim refugee. No real investigation takes place as the body is considered of no consequence until it is suspected the body is of British National Marjorie Braithwaite. DCI Lambert working for Europol is despatched to investigate. He has been furnished with information about Marjorie Braithwaite that complicate the case further. Teaming up with an old colleague in Greece, Elektra Boulos, Lambert has his work cut out unravelling who Marjorie Braithwaite was in life and who could have wanted to and had opportunity to kill her.

This grown-up pan-European crime thriller laced with espionage and intrigue was compulsive reading with an edge of reality that set the story on fire. Whilst building out picture of the victim, we are presented with in-depth characterisations of both Lambert and Boulos, who are even at odds in this complex thriller whilst they try to make sense of the case they inherited. Lambert is very much his own man and a black sheep who picks his way through cases mostly singlehanded, as in his business it is default to trust no one. I felt no disadvantage from not having read any of the previous books in the DCI Lambert series.

There are suspects with motives ranging from getting bad book reviews to international espionage and human trafficking. If you like your police procedural crime thriller well written with that additional factor of plausibility and a huge dose of double dealing then you do not want to miss reading this one.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT THE DCI JONES CASEBOOK: SEAN FREEMAN BY @KerryJDonovan #SundayBlogShare

Today’s team review is from Terry, she blogs at http://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Terry has been reading The DCI Jones Casebook: Sean Freeman by Kerry J Donovan

25457591

The DCI Jones Casebook: Sean Freeman by Kerry J Donovan

4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed by me as a member of Rosie Amber’s Review Team

I read another of Kerry Donovan’s books, ‘On Lucky Shores’ for Rosie’s review blog, which I liked a lot, so chose to review this one as soon as it was submitted. Whereas ‘On Lucky Shores’ is an all-American mystery thriller set in Colorado, this is a traditional British detective type story. I think Donovan’s American mode has the slight edge, but this one also stands up well next to the best in its genre.

The first part of the novel consists of two storylines: DCI Jones and his merry throng in the present day, and locksmith turned jewel thief Sean Freeman’s journey into the dangerous criminal underworld of Digby Parrish. Eventually, the two threads collide….

This book’s plot is quite a masterpiece, so well thought out, with plenty of nice little twists that I didn’t see coming at all. I was most impressed by the research that had obviously taken place to make the details authentic, but this is woven artfully into the storyline and is never obtrusive. The characterisation is terrific, in particular Digby Parrish (wonderfully scary!) and Detective Charlie Pelham, the latter of whom is a stereotypical 1970s throwback type of crime fighter – very funny! I liked DCI Jones, who is a little eccentric in a mild sort of way, and Sean Freeman is one of those criminals who you find yourself rooting for – I always admire a writer who can make you root for the ‘baddie’! I must applaud the dialogue all the way through the book, too.

I’d definitely recommend this to anyone who likes a good, current, British crime thriller. Kerry Donovan is a most talented wordsmith and I hope to read more from him soon.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com