Living With Amnesia. @em_banks reviews Small Forgotten Moments by @AnnalisaCrawf, for Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT

Today’s team review is from Elanor.

Rosie's #Bookreview Team #RBRT

Elanor has been reading Small Forgotten Moments by Annalisa Crawford

Small Forgotten Moments by [Annalisa Crawford]

Small Forgotten Moments is the story of Jo Mckye, an emerging artist celebrating her debut exhibition. But her fictional subject, Zenna, has become an obsession. We see Zenna infiltrating every part of Jo’s life and her unconscious as Jo increasingly struggles with telling the real from the fictional. She is driven to return to her childhood home and learn about her past in an effort to understand Zenna’s origins, and try to rid herself from this malevolent influence.

We are told early on that Jo suffers from amnesia, meaning she can’t remember any of her life before 3 years ago. Amnesia is a trope that is fairly well explored in the psychological thriller genre but I felt that the perspective here is interesting and stays on the right side of cliche. I occasionally asked myself “How would that even work?” – only to be given some insight and a whole bunch of new questions in the next chapter.

The novel focuses not on a disorientating early confusion stage of amnesia, but on Jo’s long-term experience, asking what it means to try to live a normal life, to create and plan without reference to a past – “I know I’m not who I’m supposed to be. How can I be, with so much of myself nestled so deeply within?“. In this context, Jo’s art appears as both therapy and a feverish necessity, as she wrestles unconsciously with her past.

The first person narration is so tight and unreliable that I felt some secondary characters were robbed of airtime. I wanted more of the best friend and the housemate, and in particular I felt I didn’t get a handle on Jo’s mum – though this probably reflects Jo’s own uncertainty and mental fog during her time at home.

The Cornish sea is almost a character in its own right. I loved the way Annalisa Crawford illustrates Jo’s confused mental state using the language of water as primal, uncontrollable and dangerous – foreshadowing a dramatic, psychological climax that was definitely not what I expected.

I read this book so quickly! It kept me entertained and guessing to the end. I would absolutely recommend it to fans of the genre.

4 stars.

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Is Zenna a muse, a sleep-deprived apparition, or something much more sinister?

Suffering long-term amnesia, artist Jo Mckye is ready to start a fresh, new project after the success of her debut exhibition. But the fictional subject of the collection, Zenna, won’t let go so easily. Infiltrating Jo’s dreams—and increasingly, her waking hours—Zenna is fast becoming a dangerous obsession.

Jo is confident the answers lie at her childhood home, an idyllic Cornish village on the south-east coast; she just doesn’t know why. Only when she walks into the sea and almost drowns does the past start to unravel.

Haunting and melodic, fans of Daphne du Maurier and Daisy Johnson will adore this.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

Small Forgotten Moments by [Annalisa Crawford]

Rosie’s #Bookreview Of #NewRelease THREE WEDDINGS AND A PROPOSAL by @sheilaoflanagan

Three Weddings and a ProposalThree Weddings and a Proposal by Sheila O’Flanagan

4 stars

Three Weddings And A Proposal is a contemporary story set in Ireland in a post-pandemic time. Delphie is the personal assistant of a successful businessman and the story opens with her being in charge of buying a very expensive bracelet for her boss’s girlfriend.

In her personal life Delphie needs a plus-one partner for her brother’s wedding; she’s running out of time to find a single man. Luckily, while returning from a business trip she bumps into an ex-boyfriend who kindly agrees to attend the wedding with her.

Fast forward a few weeks and Delphie’s life has been turned upside down, both on the work and domestic front. She has a lot of decisions to make and while her family think they know what she wants, Delphie needs to discover where her true feelings lie.

This was an easy read in a popular genre; much of the story was quite predictable, though, so some readers may be a little disappointed. I particularly enjoyed the Irish setting, and Delphie’s organisational skills were quite inspiring. I also liked how this was set just after the current pandemic, giving me some hope for a return to normality.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

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At the first wedding, there‘s a shock

The second wedding is unexpected

By the third, Delphie thinks nothing could surprise her. But she’s wrong . . .

Delphie is enjoying her brother’s wedding. Her surprise last-minute Plus One has stunned her family – and it’s also stopped any of them asking again why she’s still single. But when she sees all the missed calls that evening, she knows it can’t be good news. And she’s right.

Delphie has been living her best life, loving her job, her friends, her no-strings relationships and her dream house by the sea. Now she has to question everything she believed about who she is and what she wants. Is her mum right – is it time to settle down? Or does she want to keep on trying to have it all?

Each wedding of a glorious summer brings a new surprise. And as everything Delphie thought she had is threatened, she has the chance to reshape her future.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT Domestic Abuse Story GRACE AND SERENITY by @AnnalisaCrawf

Today’s team review is from Alison. She blogs here https://alisonwilliamswriting.wordpress.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Alison has been reading Grace And Serenity by Annalisa Crawford

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This is a really well-written novel, full of emotion, and it’s good to read a story involving domestic abuse that doesn’t hold back, and that really traces Grace’s story from an innocent and hopeful young girl to someone manipulated into making decisions that ruin her life.

Grace is very well-drawn and her feelings and frustrations are depicted clearly, making the reader really care about her and what is happening to her.

However, I found it quite difficult to accept that Grace’s parents would react the way they did towards the man who treated their daughter so badly. They are supportive and loving and interested in their daughter, so it didn’t seem realistic at all that they would behave the way they do – this really spoiled the story for me, unfortunately. While I could completely understand and believe that Grace could be so manipulated, I didn’t believe that her parents could be, and that they would trust a man who had hurt their daughter.

That said, this is a thought-provoking, sensitive and well-written novel.

Four stars

Book description

Living on the streets is terrifying and exhausting. Grace’s only comforts are a steady stream of vodka, and a strange little boy who’s following her around.

At nineteen, Grace has already had a child and endured an abusive marriage. But she’s also had her baby abducted by her vengeful husband and been framed as a neglectful mother. Even her own parents doubted her version of the story. So she did the only thing that made sense to her—run away.

The streets are unforgiving. Winter is drawing in. And Grace isn’t prepared for the harsh realities of survival. At her very bleakest, a Good Samaritan swoops into her life and rescues her. With a roof over her head and food in her stomach, she longs to see her baby again.

But nothing ever comes for free.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT @elgeereviews The Corner Office by @KaterinaBaker

Today’s team review is from Gayathri, she blogs here http://musings-over-nothing.blogspot.co.uk/

#RBRT Review Team

Gayathri has been reading The Corner Office by Katerina Baker

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Tara Johnson is a hard working woman who fights hard to win her place in the male dominated executive room. She has no personal life other than visiting her ailing mother because her work consumes her entire day. She takes joy and pride in making her work place better for the other women there, the support she didn’t have when she started.

Her work life is still not an easy place, even though she is one of the top executives of a Fortune 500 company, thanks to her nemesis Richard Boyd. They started together fresh out of college and the past fifteen years have done little to ease the competition between them. Their boss John believes their rivalry brings the best out of them, thus helping the company and begins their final race towards their ultimate prize – the Managing Director position.

Everything changes when Tara finds herself attracted to her subordinate Aidan, who is every woman’s fantasy. How does this love change Tara’s life? Does she realize that work place romances are not as easy as it seems before it is too late? You should grab The Corner Office to know what find the answers.

I requested the book looking for an easy read with the plot about interoffice romance with a dark twist. But it proved to be more than I bargained for and it is not your typical love triangle. The plot has a steady pace, and the intimate scenes are refreshingly well written. I finished it in about three hours which is my new best.

I liked the premise and the ending which is what we were rooting for. I loved everything about the book except its lead characters. I know what I said sounds confusing. Let me explain.

I tried so hard to like Tara. She is hard working. She is at the top. She has her priorities. She treats other women with respect and encourages them. And yet I failed to like her at all.

Was it because she talks so much about work life balance, while she didn’t have any? Was it because she talks about sexual harassment and then suffers abuses and threats from an ex silently? Or is it about her work place romance? Well, on the whole, I gave up. I don’t like Tara, the lead.

Though two of the lead characters have been trying to beat each other for more than a decade, there is a very little back-story to support that, except that Tara had turned Richard down when he asked her out. And he is supposed to be a playboy, and you are supposed to dislike him. Because he is a serial womanizer; he does not respect others privacy.

But the problem I had with disliking him was that all these reasons were what Tara tells us. There is not one instance, (okay there is one scene – the very first one) that he behaves like a creep. And given the history of Tara’s men (man), I lost the trust on her calling him creep. SoI ended up liking Richard, not in a mushy way but in a ‘thank God he is not what Tara presumed to be’ way.

Despite all these, I kinda liked the undertone of the story that spoke about feminism and women empowerment, without making it preachy. If you want to read an interoffice romance with just a perfect dose of violence, flirty and steamy scenes, The Corner Office should be your pick.

Book Description

Tara Johnson’s sacrifices are about to pay off: a senior executive at thirty-five at a Fortune 500 company, she’s one of the two finalists in line for a Managing Director position. Unfortunately, her rival of fifteen years, the charming, infuriating Richard Boyd, is just as qualified, and unlike her, he’s willing to cross pretty much every line to get what he wants.

Of all the things Tara stored in the attic to make it to the top, it’s her personal life she misses the most. That is, until she starts a steamy affair with sex god Aidan, her direct report. Interoffice relationships with a subordinate can mean the end of a career, and when Richard finds out, it’s the perfect opportunity to take his high-heeled nemesis out, especially since he’s still nursing a grudge against Tara for rejecting him years ago.

But Tara’s increasingly domineering lover has his own dark secrets, endangering more than just her career. As her liaison spirals out of control, salvation will come from the man she always thought she hated, and perhaps the only one to truly understand

About the author

Katerina Baker

Katerina Baker is a lucky gal who still attempts to have it all: full-time project management job that she enjoys, crazy family of four (with the ongoing threats of getting a pet to upset the family equilibrium) and writing.

Although on some days she is much more successful at managing her life than on the others, she still claims that she doesn’t want it any other way.

Katerina is represented by Sharon Belcastro from Belcastro Agency, and has a contract with Lachesis Publishing, who will be publishing her Romantic Suspense novel Under the Scrubs.

Goodreads | AmazonUK | AmazonUS | Twitter

SOUPER MUM by Kristen Bailey #Contemporary #WomensFiction @baileyforce6

Souper MumSouper Mum by Kristen Bailey
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Souper Mum is a contemporary women’s fiction novel about mother of four Jools Campbell and her showdown with celebrity TV chef Tommy McCoy.

On a disastrous Monday morning Jools is accosted in the supermarket by Tommy as he sources participants for his TV show where he shows ordinary people healthier ways to cook and eat. Jools isn’t in the mood for this and tells him straight what she thinks of him and his show. That evening she discovers she is a YouTube sensation as someone filmed her supermarket rant. The newspapers run articles on her verbal fight and the social media machine snowballs the situation.

Chaos abounds in Jools everyday life and her new life as a media star. The battle with Tommy culminates in a live TV cook-off, will Jools and her family recipes win over Tommy and his insistence that only organic foods should be fed to families?

This is a fun dialogue lead book which leaves the reader breathless at the end of its galloping pace.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book Description

A fantastic debut novel that takes a refreshing look at family, modern life, and the joyless merits of quinoa. Monday morning can’t get any worse for harassed mum-of-four Jools Campbell when, after a frantic school run, she’s cornered in the supermarket by pompous celebrity chef Tommy McCoy, who starts criticising the contents of her trolley. Apparently the fact that she doesn’t make her own bread or buy organic is tantamount to child abuse. In a hurry and short of patience, she berates McCoy for judging her when she hasn’t the time or the money to feed her family in line with his elitist ideals. Unbeknownst to Jools, her rant has been filmed and immediately goes viral on YouTube, making her a reluctant celebrity overnight. With McCoy determined to discredit her by delving into her personal life, Jools decides it’s time to fight her corner in the name of all the fraught mums out there who are fed up with being made to feel bad by food snobs like him. Armed with some fish fingers and her limited cooking repertoire, Jools must negotiate the unfamiliar world of celebrity while staying true to her instincts as a mum.

About the author

Kristen Bailey

Mother-of-four, gin-drinker, binge-watcher, receipt hoarder, hapless dog owner, enthusiastic but terrible cook. Kristen also writes. She has had short fiction published in several publications including Mslexia & Riptide. Her novels are her own take on contemporary women’s fiction and are published by the very excellent Accent Press.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS | Goodreads | Twitter also free with Kindle Unlimited

GRIND by Edward Vukovic @RutegerJones Australian setting for a #coffee themed book.

GrindGrind by Edward Vukovic
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Grind is a contemporary piece of literature set in Melbourne, Australia and follows five different characters towards an end when it is revealed how they are all connected. Throughout the story coffee is a common thread linking them all. The book is primarily written in first person from multiple points of view.

Ziva is Eastern European, with a gift of sight, she reads the signs left by the dregs in strong Turkish cups of coffee. She has come to Australia, following her brother and his wife, but she struggles to make friends and fit in.

Isaac owns a bar, he mourns the loss of his wife who died several years ago, he owns a dog he names Dante and he writes poetry.

Simon is a struggling estate agent, when he’s late for work one day a colleague takes the call about a property he’s been trying to sell for ages and makes the deal. His day gets worse when he finds the others in the office have also stolen his supply of precious coffee and it tips him over the edge, sending him on a dangerous drinking spree.

Michel is a mysterious homeless man with a shocking past and one he tries to escape, fearing violence from the bosses he stole from, he hopes his new life will keep them away, instead his past deeds return in an innocent form to haunt him.

Danielle is a schoolgirl who brushes the lives of all the other characters as they meet her one by one at a traffic light crossing.

This book takes a bit of getting into, especially as there is no indication which character each new chapter is about. The first person narrative is not necessarily the fault, but perhaps helpful chapter headings with just the character’s name would ease the reading experience. As it is, each new chapter takes a bit of time to work out who is talking and it interrupted the flow of the story for me.

The good thing is that there is plenty of rich writing to indulge in and the coffee theme is fun and well done. I particularly enjoyed Ziva’s coffee cup readings. Harder for me was the teasing out of the characters, it took a long while to understand that there were several characters and that the story had changed to someone new, meaning I had to re-read sections. We got to know the characters from their background story build ups but not from any striking dialogue or minds-eye visualisation.

AmazonUS | AmazonUK | Goodreads | Twitter

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book Description

“Ziva’s love of coffee is double-edged. Throughout her life, she gives her talent freely to those desperate for a glimpse into destiny’s promise. Predicting the future with chilling accuracy, she understands the cost and has sworn never to divine her own truth. Having fled the economic aftershocks of the Balkan war, she struggles adjusting to her new life and clings to the remnants of her past, until she meets Isaac. Against her better judgement, Ziva ‘reads’ for herself and what she sees will change her life irrevocably.

Told from the perspective of multiple characters, Grind follows the plight of Ziva, an ordinary immigrant with an extraordinary gift, and highlights the impact we have on each other through the interconnectedness of chance encounters.”

About the author

Edward Vukovic

Edward Vukovic is a Melbourne-based writer and novelist. He has work published across numerous publications including The Journal, The Adviser, The Roar and Shoot Farken. When he’s not writing about his poor parenting skills or fantasy football you will most likely find him hurling instructions at the television, steadfast in his belief that the players of whatever sport he’s watching at the time are actually listening to his ranting.

Edward is married to his wonderful and talented wife Vesna and is a proud, if sometimes bewildered, father to his amazing son Oliver.

B-SIDE (Arielle Lockley #2.5) by @ellefie #Contemporary novella #wwwblogs

B-Side (Arielle Lockley, #2.5)B-Side by Elle Field
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

B-Side is a contemporary novella and book #2.5 in the Kept series. It takes on the character of Etta Millhouse. This book is best read in conjunction with the others in the series.

Etta is a bad-ass wannabe singer with a drug habit. The goddaughter of Felicity Farrell, she is used to doing what she wants, when she wants to, but Felicity has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and is gradually getting more forgetful.

When she asks Etta to oversee Arielle’s new pop-up shop plan it is with great reluctance that Etta sets foot in Arielle’s world. Meanwhile the chance of a record signing looms, Etta’s big dream , but any sign of fear and Etta is snorting drugs to boost her confidence.

Will she ever admit she’s addicted or can she stay clean for Felicity and her new found fame?

A fun quick read, the style is chatty and well paced.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com available free from Kindle Unlimited

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Rosie’s Book Review Team #RBRT Barb Reviews Last Child by Terry Tyler

Today we have a review from Barb, she blogs at http://barbtaub.com/

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Barb has been reading Last Child by Terry Tyler

Last Child by Terry Tyler

Last Child by Terry Tyler

The good old days…weren’t

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I’ve wondered what the effect might have been if historical (or literary) figures had modern technology. (If Adam and Eve Sent Texts) Would Julius Caesar have gotten a text from Anthony: Hey, J—that seer chick’s Ides of March RT is mega trending. Might want to work from home that day bro.

Of course, the fates are sneaky bitches, so maybe they would have just wriggled things around to make them happen as usual. Romeo was a bit wet anyway, so he’d probably have forgotten to take his phone charger when he skipped out of Verona. He wouldn’t have seen Juliet’s text message: Guna fake my dead so mma d’crypt @midnite on Thu. O n dont come erly nthink I’m x-( . N no go-N2 1 of yr meltdowns n kilyrslf. Lol.

Terry Tyler’s entertaining approach to historical upgrades brought us Kings and Queens, and she’s just released her new sequel, LAST CHILD.



gold starMy Review: 5 out of 5 stars for LAST CHILD

‘Tour de force: a feat or display of strength, skill, or ingenuity. a very skillful and successful effort or performance’ –Miriam-Webster

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Terry Tyler gave serious consideration to the Tudors’ historical makeover in her stunning novel, Kings and Queens (see my review plus interview with Terry here). As I said in that review, what turned an interesting concept into a tour de force was that each woman told her personal story in her own unique voice. It was captivating and absolutely mesmerizing to not only see each character’s internal reasoning, but also to get a voyeur’s view of each woman through the eyes of the others.

The only problem? I wanted to know… no, I needed to know what came next. Sure, I could read the history books. But it wasn’t the same as getting in the heads of these women and seeing how their hopes and dreams and failures played out. And then getting to see that all over again through different eyes.

 

But great news! Terry Tyler has just released LAST CHILD. Not only can I get my “and then what?” fix, but she continues to find the unique character and voice for the next generation, the three surviving children of Harry Lanchester/ Henry VIII:

  • Young Jasper/King Edward VI, Harry’s designated heir, is teetering between childhood and proud acceptance of his future. “When Izzy talks about J. Dud ‘running amok’ I get a picture in my mind of him haring round the boardroom with a tomahawk, I don’t know why. I think it’s the ‘k’ in ‘amok’.”
  • Eldest daughter Isabella/Queen Mary I tells us, “People say, oh, Isabella never got over her parents getting divorced, it’s time she let the past go and moved on, but they haven’t got a clue what I went through, or they’d know it couldn’t do anything but colour the rest of my life.
  • Younger daughter Erin/Queen Elizabeth I is a girl whose strength—and tragedy—is to see more clearly than any other character what her role and future must be. “Do you know why I shall never do the husband bit?” she said, pointing her cigarette a bit too close to my face. “It’s because it ends women’s lives. Look at the evidence. My mother, my beautiful, intelligent, much sought after mother— she falls in love with my father, he screws around and rejects her, she ODs on charlie alone in her flat. Jaz’s mum would probably be alive and kicking if she hadn’t married my dad, as would Keira Howard. Izzy— I need say no more. Even if you don’t end up dead or in a nuthouse, getting married totally erodes your confidence and breaks your heart. Ask Kate, or Izzy’s mum. Or your mum. Or your wife, come to think of it. Nah, you’re better off alone, just having lovers. The trouble comes when you start believing in true love.

In addition, LAST CHILD give us the fascinating supporting cast of characters who orbit the Lanchester/Tudor family. I particularly liked Raine/Lady Jane Grey, whose drive to rise above her council-flat background only brings her triumph crashing down after her nine-day ‘reign’ (I can’t be the only one who likes that pun!): “Most of all, I wanted people to see me as someone they’d like to emulate, not as part of some pop psychology-loving, lazy, dog-on-a-string, pink dreadlocked, weirdo hippy underclass, to be laughed and pointed at.”

Even more remarkably, while following the sweep of history, Terry Tyler isn’t a slave to the changes that would come from modernizing. So along with the fun of recognizing characters and historical events, there is the surprise and delight of seeing them interpreted in modern terms.

I wouldn’t hesitate to give LAST CHILD five stars out of five. Quite simply, Terry Tyler has done it again. I thought that Kings and Queens would be difficult to top. But what I realized was that she didn’t need to top it. LAST CHILD is, instead, the brilliantly-executed, perfectly plotted, proper end to the story. I should probably tell you that you don’t really have to read Kings and Queens first. But that would mean you miss out on half the fun and a lot of inside jokes. So do yourself a favor—get a good bottle of wine, some quality me-time, and these two amazing reads. You deserve it.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Rosie’s Book Review Team #RBRT Georgia reviews Last Child by Terry Tyler

Today we have a review from Georgia, she blogs at http://www.georgiarosebooks.com/

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Georgia chose to read and review Last Child by Terry Tyler

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I loved ‘Kings and Queens’ and have been looking forward to ‘Last Child’, the sequel, coming out, and eagerly bought it the minute it landed on Amazon.

Although this could be read as a standalone I would hugely recommend reading ‘Kings and Queens’ first not only because it is a joy to read but you will also understand the background to the legacy of Harry Lanchester, his heirs, on who this book is based much better. There is however a comprehensive introduction at the beginning of ‘Last Child’ which brings you up to speed and gives you all you need to know about the setting for this story.

This book is hugely entertaining and has made me laugh, cry and everything in between those extremes. Hannah, the nanny and one of my favourite characters from ‘Kings and Queens’ takes a big lead role in narrating much of this story but others also take their turn and the different points of view are very well handled.

There is so much to say about so many fabulous characters both the good ones as well as the bad but without giving anything away about who, what, when and why I also loved many of the relationships in this sequel. Many that I perhaps shouldn’t have done but did, Jim Dudley who grew on me, Raine Grey – utterly heartbreaking… Robert Dudley firm but with the patience of a saint and Erin who I enjoyed watching develop from doing something truly horrible as a teenager into…well…I’ll leave you to find that out.

The characters Tyler creates are as real, sumptuous and lavish as the Lanchester Estates Headquarters and she gets all the voices spot on from Jaz as a teenager to those more mature in years as well as touching on mental illness and dementia.

I don’t have much time to read at the moment but I put aside time to savour this one and finished it in tears. However with the way this ended and with some delicious little teasers of what’s to come (Letty, as just one example!) I am daring to hold out a glimmer of hope that there may just be another book in this terrific series and if there is I shall be first in line for a copy.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

 

Rosie’s Book Review Team #RBRT Terry Reviews Six Months To Get A Life by Ben Adams

Today’s book review comes from team member Terry, she blogs at http://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

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Terry chose to read and review Six Months To Get A Life by Ben Adams

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Six Months To Get A Life by Ben Adams

4.2 out of 5 stars

This is a very well written, enjoyable, easy-read contemporary drama of the grown up ‘lad lit’ variety, and I read it all in one go – which is a good recommendation, for a start!

I was a bit worried, before I started it, that it might be too much like a Nick Hornby or David Nicholls, but Ben Adams definitely has his own style. His main character, father of two sons Graham Hope, is a newly divorced 42 year old, pretty despondent about most aspects of his life. Graham gives himself six months, until his 43rd birthday, to make the changes on his to-do list. The story is written in diary form, something I like and think works very well for a novel of this type.

I found Graham frustratingly unsure of himself and meek at first, but he does grow some cojones somewhere in the middle of the six months. It’s very ‘real life’ but in a cosy sort of way, and contains moments both touching and amusing; the humour is generally of the quiet smile provoking rather than the hilarious, though I did laugh out loud at some funny phone-connected bits at 44, 46 and 63% – I always note down when a book actually makes me do that!

Negatives? Hardly any. Not a great deal happens and some threads could have been developed more to good effect, but that’s fine; it works. I did find some of the dialogue a little odd; I can’t imagine any woman ringing up a man a couple of weeks after a one night stand and saying ‘It has been a while since we made love’, and I was a bit confused by Graham’s concern about what ‘having sex with a divorced woman’ would be like – it’s not the 1950s, when a divorced woman might be seen as a little racy, or indeed anything out of the ordinary! But Graham is not a man of the world, so perhaps that’s in character – I was just pleased he got out of the marriage to the draggy ex….

To sum up – I’d definitely recommend it to anyone who likes light family drama, lad it, stories about real life and realistic relationships, and especially if you’re divorced with children; you’ll probably relate to much of it. I liked Graham, and his sons; it’s the sort of book you close with a smile and makes you think, yes, I enjoyed that!

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com