Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT BEDSIT THREE by @sallyjenkinsuk #Thriller #SundayBlogShare

Today’s second team review is from Judith W, she blogs at https://readandreview2016.wordpress.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Judith has been reading Bedsit Three by Sally Jenkins

27390595

BEDSIT THREE: A TALE OF MURDER, MYSTERY AND LOVE by SALLY JENKINS

  • Title: Bedsit Three: A Tale of Murder, Mystery and Love
  • Published: 2015
  • Author: Sally Jenkins
  • Started: Sunday 4th September 2016
  • Finished: Wednesday 14th September 2016

Bedsit Three focuses on the lives of the tenants of Vesey Villa, a collection of bedsits.  There is a new tenant in Bedsit Three, Ian, after the old tenants – Ignatius Smith and his girlfriend – suddenly vanish from the town. Ian wants to prove himself as a father to his son, Marcus, and finds solace in his neighbour Sandra, and her daughter Halifax. However, the tenants find themselves embroiled in a murder mystery case when it is revealed that neither Ignatius or his girlfriend have been seen for a very long time…

I found Bedsit Three very engrossing and easy to read, which I think is important for books in the mystery and thriller genres.

The prologue was really well-written; this was a pleasant surprise for me, as I am notorious for skipping the prologue because they never tend to be quite scruffy and don’t add anything to the plot. However, this does not apply to Jenkin’s book!

I felt the plot flowed at a reasonable pace, although some of Sandra’s scenes at college or Ian’s scenes with Jo felt somewhat of a side-track. My favourite parts of Bedsit Three were the first person narration scenes with Ignatius – you could really see inside his head, and understand his mental process. In addition, with a name like Ignatius, it’s immediately clear that he’s going to be a creepy character.

Speaking of names, I didn’t like the names Ignatius or Halifax – I know they were meant to be original and had special meanings, but I still just thought they were very weird – especially in contrast to more mundane character names like Ian.

My only concerns with Bedsit Three are the title and the use of description.

I think the title is too long (Bedsit Three would more than suffice), and at times the description of mundane items or events was far too detailed. For example, something as ordinary as a cup of tea might be described as ‘a warm, ceramic mug of delicious brown tea’, which doesn’t sound very genuine.

All in all, the plot was dramatic, the climax was dramatic and I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book.

Star Rating: 4/5 Stars

Bedsit Three is available to buy as an e-book or paperback from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com.

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT BEDSIT THREE by @sallyjenkinsuk #Thriller #fridayreads

Today’s second team review is from Judith, she blogs at http://judithbarrowblog.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Judith has been reading Bedsit Three by Sally Jenkins

27390595

My Review:

I really enjoyed this novel, it’s a good psychological thriller that steadily builds in tension until the end.

Sally Jenkins’ style of writing is easy to read without being cosy. Her words take the reader steadily through the plot without revealing too much, yet there is also subtle foreshadowing. .

The main characters are well portrayed: the single mother, Sandra, with a young daughter, the new occupant of bedsit three, Ian, a middle class, unemployed man, separated from his wife and son, desperate to be reunited with them. And then there is the former resident of bedsit three;  the mentally disturbed  Ignatius Smith, evicted and living nearby in his car. The author gradually reveals the actions and thought processes of each of these people. And  I liked how the two”off the scene” characters associated with  Ignatius Smith were revealed.. And, no, I won’t say any more about that!

My only disappointment in the whole of this book was with the dialogue. Sometimes, with all of the characters, I thought the dialogue was stilted (perhaps a little contrived?) and didn’t fit their portrayed personalities. Every now a then a section of speech felt as though it was there, not so much for exposition, but for explanation to the reader. Hmm, does that make sense? .

The main setting is Vesey Villas, an old house separated into cramped bedsits. The descriptions of the building are evocative and gives a good sense of place; of seedy, uncared-for rooms. In fact each setting that the characters move around in is well depicted

Bedsit Three has a good, progressive plot, the story is equally shared between the three main characters and was gripping enough to  keep me reading almost in one session. Personally I was a little disappointed with the ending. But this wasn’t because of the writing or the way the plot evolved; it was because I wanted a different ending. I need to stress this was purely personal and gives credit to the writing of Sally Jenkins. So ignore what I’ve just written. You could always find out what I mean by buying this great book.

Bedsit Three is for anyone who enjoys a well written contemporary  psychological thriller.

Buying links:

Amazon.co.uk: http://amzn.to/2bOZQYY

Amazon.com: http://amzn.to/2c5OrG4

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT BEDSIT THREE by @sallyjenkinsuk #Thriller #wwwblogs

Today’s second team review is from Terry, she blogs at http://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Terry has been reading Bedsit Three by Sally Jenkins

27390595

Bedsit Three by Sally Jenkins

4 out of 5 stars

A dark, fairly gritty drama with a side plot of insanity and murder – I enjoyed it!  It centres around Vesey Villas, an old house made up into seedy bedsits.  One occupant is Sandra, a single mother with her daughter, and a new arrival is Ian, an enemployed father who is hoping to get back together with his wife.  Sleeping in his car outside is the former resident of Bedsit Three, Ignatius Smith, who is eager to get back inside the building….

The novel is well written and nicely observed, the characterisation extremely good – I loved the parts about the increasingly disturbed Ignatius, and Sandra and Ian are both real and likeable, the sort of characters you root for.  The plot is perfectly paced, alternating between the three main characters, with no boring bits; I was not tempted to skip read at all, and read 80% of it in one sitting.

On occasion I felt the dialogue was a little unlikely, and I thought Ian’s story was too speedily and rather drearily wound up in the epilogue (I hoped for so much better for him!), but these are my only complaints, and they are but minor.  I enjoyed the unfolding of Ignatius’s story the most.

I think it would be enjoyed by anyone who likes a mild sort of contemporary thriller; it’s very good.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com