Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT OY YEW by @AnaSalote #KidsLit #Fantasy #fridayreads

Today’s team review is from Lilyn, she blogs here http://www.scifiandscary.com/

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Lilyn has been reading Oy Yew by Ana Salote

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Oy Yew has a slow, special magic to it. It’s not a book that immediately draws you in, but gently ushers you in the story’s direction. The world Ana Salote has created has a sense of richness to it, though not much is seen in this first book. The main character, Oy Yew, is a gorgeous soul. The type of soul that you never have to worry about going bad, or getting spoiled by the meanness in the world. Fiercely loyal, with an innate ability to make the best of everything, and bring out the best in every one, Oy worms himself into your heart.

This story felt, strongly, as if it could have been the story of the House Elves from Harry Potter. Take away the magic, and make the elves a bit more human looking, and you’ve got it. That subservient attitude with the occasional free-thinker bucking the trend. The ridiculous punishments and gets-on-with-its. Even Master Jeopardine brings to mind a slightly more insane acting Lucius Malfoy. It’s very much it’s own story, but if you’ve read Harry Potter and felt even the tiniest flicker of sympathy for Dobby, you’ll make the connection to this book. This is not a light and fluffy story. It’s dark, sometimes disturbing, and filled with sorrow but ultimately rewarding.

Oy Yew is aimed at 8 to 12 year olds, and I think hits that pretty well. However, it feels a bit long. It took me a good while to read through it on my own.  I think it could have been cut down by about 30 pages, and still been just as good. Easily distracted readers will probably have problems with it. I’d highly recommend making it bedtime read, where the kids can just relax and listen to the story. Oy Yew is the first book in the Waifs of Duldred series and is available on Amazon. It’s worth the money and the time to read it.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT OY YEW by @anasalote #KidsLit #TuesdayBookBlog

Today’s team review is from Noelle, she blogs at http://saylingaway.wordpress.com

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Noelle has been reading Oy Yew by Ana Salote

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Book Review: Oy Yew by Ana Salote

Oy Yew is book I of the Waifs of Duldred Trilogy and was longlisted for the Times/Chicken House prize for children’s fiction. I would have awarded it first place. Occasionally I pick up a YA book to read and the title of this one intrigued me. I discovered it is a terrific read, one I could not put down, and I think anyone from 12 to 100 would love it.

The author has created a totally believable and engrossing dystopian world, one in which goodness blossoms and evil exists but is not spelled out. It begins with a small boy, so small and pale that no one notices him. He lives outside a bakery, living on the wonderful smells of bread and sweets and scraps from garbage. When he is mistakenly nabbed as a Porian – a child discarded from that land and sent by raft to drift to Affland or die on the way – he is brought to a factory to work. When asked his name, his captors say he responds to “Oy, You!” and he is named Oy Yew.

Oy Yew slaves away in the factory along with other waifs, who are fed little and worked hard. He makes his first friend and is enjoying his life for the first time, but one day he is chosen to serve at Duldred Hall. ‘Lay low and grow,’ is the motto of the waifs of Duldred Hall, because if they reach the magical height of 5 thighs 10 oggits, they get to leave their life of drudgery. But their Master, Jeopardine, is determined to feed them little and keep them small.

The manor is populated by all sorts of great characters with names that look familiar but aren’t, and the waifs themselves are given names according to their assigned work. Oy becomes Drains, because he is small and can get into drains and sewers to clean them. There’s Stairs and Ceilings and Peelings, too. The waifs get around to clean, polish, change linens and sheets, etc by a system of small waif tunnels that run between floors and rooms, so they are not seen. When the head cook falls ill, and Molly, her assistant, is unable to make the complicated dishes demanded by Jeopardine for himself and his guests, Oy steps in. It seems he has a real knack for cooking, although where he learned it, no one, not even he, knows.

Even the diseases which strike Master and waif alike are fascinating. Oy is afflicted for a short while by seeing small, incredibly hued fish swimming around in his eyes.

Jeopardine is a collector of bones and will do anything to become the next President of the Grand Society of Ossiquarians. Even though Oy becomes invaluable as a cook, the reader gradually becomes aware that Jeopardine values the bones of Oy even more, and his methods of working the waifs and particularly Oy, become sinister.

There are many mysteries in addition to the fate of the waifs. Who and what is Oy? He is not a Porian but doesn’t know where he came from or who he is, just that he is different. Can the waifs escape? Who can they trust? What will happen as Jeopardine descends into madness?

Oy Yew is a children’s classic for adults, too. It tickles the brain as a lighthearted fairy tale with a murder mystery and an adventure story. This is a book I will definitely read again, and if I could give it ten stars, I would. I can’t wait for the second book in this series.
Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com