Rosie’s #Bookreview of #Ya #Fantasy Animo by Lisa Ann Rowe (Book one of the Sationem series)

ANIMO: BOOK ONE OF THE SATIONEM SERIESANIMO: BOOK ONE OF THE SATIONEM SERIES by Lisa Ann Rowe

3 stars

Animo is a young adult fantasy story and the first book in The Sationem Series. The world of Sationem sits behind a veil and is kept secret from humans by a careful balance of four natural elements: wind, water, fire and earth.

This is the story of Willow, a young girl from the fire element who has reached the age when her full magical talents come to fruition. However, as she goes through ‘the change’ it becomes obvious that she has been granted not one, but all four elements. This is very rare and adds to anxiety she already has because of her missing parents, a creeping sinister shift of the elements and, just recently, her brother’s disappearance. Can Willow, with the help of Blue from the wind group, take on the responsibilities of leadership of her people and help restore balance in their world?

I liked the premise of the story, but I never found that connection to the characters and the storyline which I need to escape with when I enjoy a book. For me, this story needs more work on some of its structure and writing techniques to make it believable and to lift it to the next level in this
competitive genre.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book description

Animo is the first book in the Sationem Series. When Willow Awakens with elemental abilities that she shouldn’t have, she unwillingly releases a necromantic witch. An elemental imbalance occurs, and she and Blue must work together to save Sationem before the human realm seeps through. A young adult fantasy novel.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

ANIMO: BOOK ONE OF THE SATIONEM SERIES by [Lisa Ann Rowe]

Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT Sailing Themed #Mystery DRACA by @GeoffreyGudgion @unbounders

Today’s team review is from Sandra, she blogs here https://www.firthproof.co.uk/index.php/book-reviews

#RBRT Review Team

Sandra has been reading Draca by Geoffrey Gudgion

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Draca is a wonderful tale that combines many different elements and weaves them together to make a satisfying story; not an easy book to categorize so it will have wide appeal. I started reading Draca on the Pigeonhole app and got so engrossed, I requested it from Rosie’s Book Review Team
list as well.

Jack is a former officer in the Royal Marines with PTSD, and a life-altering injury, trying to get his life back on an even keel. He was close to his grandfather, Eddie, who has recently died and left most of his estate to Jack. To say this does not go down well with Jack’s father, Harry, and his sister, Tilly, would be an understatement. Their mercenary attitude and sense of entitlement beggars belief especially as they had not cared much about Eddie when he was alive.

Add to this Jack’s faltering marriage to Charlotte, the rift between him and his family, and his embryonic relationship with George and you have the makings of a real page-turner. Told in the third person from the points of view of Jack, Harry and George we can see the story from all angles.
Interspersed with the narrative are extracts from Eddie’s diaries and the Norse Saga of King Guthrum which help to explain Eddie’s weird behaviour in the months before his death. The history of the Saxons and Vikings is not something I know much about, but I am now interested in finding out
more. The supernatural element is done with a light touch and seemed perfectly plausible; at times Draca does seem to be a malign influence with a mind of her own.

I loved reading about the sailing without actually having to get on a boat – it’s not something I would ever be brave enough to do, especially as I get really seasick. I don’t think it matters if you understand sailing terminology or not, when Jack takes the vintage sailing cutter out on the open
sea, the writing is thrilling and you can almost feel the spray on your face.

This is not the sort of book I would normally read, but I’m so glad I did. Beautifully written and well researched, with fully fleshed out characters, some sympathetic and others not, I thoroughly recommend that you give Draca a try.

Book description

Draca was a vintage sailing cutter, Old Eddie’s pride and joy. But now she’s beached, her varnish peeling. She’s dying, just like Eddie.
Eddie leaves Draca to his grandson Jack, a legacy that’s the final wedge between Jack and his father. Yet for Jack, the old boat is a lifeline. Medically discharged from the Marines, with his marriage on the rocks, the damaged veteran finds new purpose; Draca will sail again. Wonderful therapy for a wounded hero, people say.
Young Georgia ‘George’ Fenton, who runs the boatyard, has doubts. She saw changes in Old Eddie that were more sinister even than cancer. And by the time Draca tastes the sea again, the man she dares to love is going the same way. To George, Jack’s ‘purpose’ has become ‘possession’; the boat owns the man and her flawed hero is on a mission to self-destruct. As his controlling and disinherited father pushes him closer to the edge, she gives all she has to hold him back.
And between them all, there’s an old boat with dark secrets, and perhaps a mind of its own.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #ContemporaryRomance THE SUMMER OF TAKING CHANCES by @LynneB1

Today’s team review is from Sandra, she blogs here https://www.firthproof.co.uk/index.php/book-reviews

#RBRT Review Team

Sandra has been reading The Summer Of Taking Chances by Lynne Shelby

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Emma is looking forward to playing Juliet in the local amateur dramatic society production when Jake Murray arrives back in South Quay for the summer, ten years after he left to go to drama school, and thoroughly unsettles her. Now a household name, thanks to his role in a successful TV
series, he’s taking the summer off, away from the media spotlight, and catching up with his old school friends.

At the beginning of The Summer of Taking Chances, Jake comes across as a bit arrogant and full of himself; not very likeable really. But we get to see him through Emma’s eyes, and it’s obvious they have history. It was Emma who first got Jake interested in acting at the school drama club. As the
story is told from Emma’s point of view, their previous relationship is gradually revealed in a series of flashbacks, and it becomes clear both what he means to her and why she does not entirely trust him now.

The pace is quite slow to begin with as the scene is set, and we are introduced to all the members of the dramatic society. At one point, about halfway through, it looked as if the inevitable happy ending was not possible. From here on it was fascinating reading how Lynne Shelby made it happen in a
believable and natural way.

Both the main characters change for the better by the end of the book, and overcome the obstacles in their path. Jake’s love of the theatre is reignited, as being back where he grew up helps him remember why he loved acting in the first place. Emma comes to see that she gave up on her dream too easily, and that it’s not too late to do something about it.

Most of the action takes place in South Quay, but I enjoyed reading about their trip to London for the opening night of the musical starring Jake’s friends Zac and Julia (from Lynne’s previous book There She Goes). The walks they took along the canal showed a different, and more interesting, part
of London than the usual tourist spots.

This is the third book by Lynne Shelby that I have read, and it does not disappoint. I loved the dialogue between Jake and Emma, where they quote Shakespeare to each other, and the idyllic coastal village setting. The characters are well written and believable, and the eye-catching cover art
should ensure the book reaches a wide audience.

Book description

It’s been ten years since Emma Stevens last laid eyes on Jake Murray. When he left the small seaside village of South Quay to chase the limelight, Emma’s dreams left with him.

Now Emma is content living a quiet and uneventful life in South Quay. It’s far from the life she imagined, but at least her job at the local hotel has helped heal her broken heart.

But when Jake returns home for the summer to escape the spotlight, Emma’s feelings quickly come flooding back. There’s clearly a connection between them, but Jake has damaged her heart once already – will she ever be able to give him a second chance?

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT #Mystery THE MURDER CLUB by @NikkiCAuthor

Today’s team review is from Karen, she blogs here https://mytrainofthoughtson.wordpress.com

#RBRT Review Team

Karen has been reading The Murder Club by Nikki Crutchley

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This book reintroduces you to Miller Hatcher, a young journalist who moved back to her deceased mother’s house; sober for quite a while and working at the local newspaper, she starts receiving anonymous letters.

With “The Murder Club” (2nd in the Miller Hatcher series), Nikki Crutchley has created another gripping as well as a chilling story with a plot that keeps its promises. It is a plot that kept me glued to my eReader, drawing me very close to Miller and to Kahu. Nikki Crutchley created a well-elaborated suspense story with a complex and likeable heroine – as well as a colourful variety of further important characters. Miller and the others are believable, complemented by the aptly written plot. There is a lot more to the story than simply good versus bad; there are some insights into the human behaviour that will make you wonder. It is a highly enjoyable read with authentic characters, interesting turns, and a great flow. A memorable book to read again, written by a new author to watch out for!

This is a book for you if you like intriguing suspense, feisty heroines, believable characters, and if you appreciate cleverly elaborated stories.

Highly recommended!

Book description

A dead body. An anonymous letter. This is only the beginning.

‘Not all evil, on the surface, is ugly and menacing. It doesn’t always lurk in city centres after dark. It mows your lawns, frequents your local pub, takes its kids to school and contributes to communities.’

When the first letter arrives saying that ‘tonight it begins’, journalist Miller Hatcher ignores it. But then the body of a murdered woman is discovered, strangled, a scarf around her neck.

Cassie Hughes has always vowed to find the man who murdered her mother. Cassie knows he’s out there and wants him to pay, and Miller agrees to bring the cold case back into the public’s eye.

Logan Dodds has been obsessed with true crime ever since his sister was murdered thirty years ago. He has turned his obsession into a career and has created the True Crime Enthusiasts Club and his newest venture, True Crime Tours.

The lives of Miller, Cassie and Logan – all affected differently by murder – become entwined as The Scarf Killer, desperate for infamy, and Miller’s attention, makes his mark on the small town of Lentford.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Of #ContemporaryRomance FINDING EDWARD by @SuzMcKLink #TuesdayBookBlog

Finding Edward (Save Me, #3)Finding Edward by Suzanne McKenna Link

4.5 stars

Finding Edward is a contemporary romance, although it is the third book in this series it easily reads as a stand-alone. Eddie’s grandmother recently died and left the contents of her estate to be divided three ways; Eddie, his mum and his brother. Each of them also received a personal letter with a last wish for them to fulfil. Growing up was hard, money was tight and school was a challenge. Eddie’s first love was art, but it was only his grandmother who encouraged him to follow his dreams.

Her letter to Eddie involved a long-kept secret which his mother was left to reveal; the man he thought of as his father was not his biological parent. Eddie’s grandmother sets him two tasks; go to Positano, Italy to search for his father, and use his inheritance to enrol in art college. For years. Eddie
had put aside his love of art and taken a more conventional job, and he’d never strayed far from home; a trip to Italy would test his comfort zone to its limits.

The ups and downs of Eddie’s search for his father were believable as was the romantic theme, but it was the author’s creation of vibrant characters and beautiful Italian settings which made this book come alive. They took me right to the Amalfi coast and I could almost taste the coffee, hear the
Italian spoken and see the amazing landscapes. The Italians insisted on calling him Edward or Eduardo and the name artistically fitted the story as it progressed. I loved how Edward’s love of art was reignited and how helpful and welcoming the people of Positano were. It made me want to pack
my bags and book my own holiday. If you want a piece of escapism reading in an idyllic setting, then I can highly recommend this book.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book description

When Edward’s beloved grandmother dies, she doesn’t just leave behind money. His inheritance includes a father he never knew he had.

Now he’s forced to navigate a country he doesn’t know, using a language he doesn’t speak, in search of a man who has no clue Edward even exists.

He’s expecting disappointment, he’s expecting anger, he’s expecting pain. But what Edward isn’t expecting is to stumble across the one woman to ever steal his heart … the one woman he can never have.

Edward’s past and future collide, leaving him more lost — and more alive than he’s ever felt before.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT Victorian #Mystery FAME & FORTUNE by @carolJhedges

Today’s team review is from Cathy, she blogs here https://betweenthelinesbookblog.wordpress.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Cathy has been reading Fame & Fortune by Carol J Hedges.

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Fame & Fortune is the eighth outing for DS Jack Cully, DI Lachlan Greig and DI Leo Stride, otherwise known as the Victorian Detectives. Carol Hedges immerses us once again in a London peopled with the sad and the bad, the rich and the poor, and the evocatively described back alleys, slums and more fashionable thoroughfares they inhabit.

When a body is found hanging from the scaffolding on a bridge, Detective Inspector Greig doesn’t agree with the presumption of suicide by the attending constable. It didn’t add up in Greig’s eyes but the ineptitude of the constable regarding the scene of the crime, as Greig believed that’s what it was, didn’t help.

Then we have Gerald Daubney, a collector of antiquities who has been robbed of his priceless netsuke collection and, it seems, his manservant has also disappeared.

In a shabby, cobbled passageway in Bloomsbury we find ten year old Izzy Harding, scraping a living of sorts and existing off very little, painting furniture for dolls’ houses, one of the many children working at the long tables. Her second job washing dishes in a diner at least comes with food, such as it is.

The indomitable Miss Lucy Landseer makes another appearance when she comes to the aid, not only of novelist, Mrs Riva Hemmyng-Stratton, but also a lady in an intolerable position, in a situation that would perhaps make a good plot for one of her books.

The villainous Black brothers, Herbert and Munro, encompass all that is bad and whose shady dealings have serious and continuing repercussions throughout the city.

I enjoy these books immensely and Carol Hedges’ writing and plotting never fails to draw me in, with witty and engaging prose. Characters are extremely well drawn, giving an immediate visual image and the existing cast continue to develop. And as always, London features as a character in its own right with atmospheric descriptions and the distinct social divide between all levels of society.

Book description

When the body of a man is discovered hanging from some scaffolding under one of London’s bridges, Scotland Yard’s detective division is called in to solve the mystery of his identity & how he died. What they discover is a web of crime and extortion, and at the heart of it, two evil brothers, Munro and Herbert Black. Their inquiries will bring them into contact with the strange world of Gerald Daubney, collector of Japanese curios, whose priceless collection of netsuke has disappeared.

Facing a similar loss is Mrs Riva Hemmyng-Stratton, writer of ‘silver-fork’ novels, who suddenly finds herself embroiled in a court case when she is sued for defamation and libel by Lord Edwin Lackington. Her priceless reputation as a writer is on the line. How on earth can she prove her innocence when the only person who could vouch for it is incarcerated in a private asylum?

Many old friends make appearances in the novel … and a certain meaningful relationship finally reaches its conclusion.

AmazonUk |

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT GENERATION W: 100 Inspiring Women, 100 Years Since Women Got The Vote

Today’s team review is from Judith, she blogs here https://judithbarrowblog.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Judith has been reading Generation W by Urban Kingdom

I have dipped into this book over the last few weeks and, on the whole, enjoyed ‘listening‘ to the voices of so many inspirational women giving their opinions and their voices to what it is like to be a woman living in these times. There are many sections: arts, sports, feminism, music, politics – so many different walks in life; so varied. Some so intense that it’s only been possible to read one or two before having to set the book aside to think about their issues, their points of view. I have to admit there have been so many scenarios that I have not had to deal with in my life – and I have great admiration for the strength of character that comes through in the telling.

A small note of disappointment and something that could easily be rectified; the book does need another edit and proofread. I’ll leave it at that.

However, the honesty and integrity shines throughout the book in these uncensored interviews and I have no hesitation in recommending Generation W. A word of warning though: this is a book to buy to keep, to, as I say above, dip into. It’s actually a book I will give to my granddaughter when she is older. It shows that so much can be achieved by anyone with determination and self- belief.

 

Book description

Generation W is a collection of 100 uncensored interviews with 100 unapologetic and leading British women from all generations who answer the same ten questions about what it was like to live through the 100 years since women began to receive the vote.

Including:
Dr Averil Mansfield – The first British female professor of surgery.
Sally Gunnell – The only female athlete to win Gold at Olympic, World, European and Commonwealth level.
Laura London – At 16 years old Laura was homeless, at 18 years old she was the youngest female magician to be inducted into the Magic Circle.
Alice Powell – on the centenary of women receiving the vote, Alice Powell became the first female racing driver to win a race in Saudi Arabia, in the same year it was finally made legal for women to drive in the country.
Stacey Copeland – growing up, boxing was illegal for women to compete in, in 2018 Stacey Copeland would become the first British woman to win a Commonwealth Title.

ALSO INCLUDING:
The great-granddaughter of legendary suffragette Emmeline Pankurst, HELEN PANKHURST
The first Black leader of a British political party MANDU REID
Former Vogue cover model, leading actress and environmentalist LILY COLE
Beyonce ‘Freedom’ and ‘Runnin’ songwriter CARLA-MARIE WILLIAMS
The first mainstream celebrated female of rock music SUZI QUATRO
Ten times European Gold Medallist Speed Skater ELISE CHRISTIE
BBC Radio 1 DJ JAMZ SUPERNOVAM
PR legend and activist LYNNE FRANKS OBE
Elusive grafitti artist BAMBI
Former Chair of British Library and principal at Newnham College, Cambridge University DAME CAROL BLACK

And many more.

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Generation W: 100 women. 100 years since women began to receive the vote. 100% uncensored. by [Urban Kingdom]

Rosie’s #Bookreview Of #HistoricalFiction Based on Real Events ON THE ROOF GANG by Matt Zullo

The US Navy's On-the-Roof Gang: Volume I - Prelude to WarThe US Navy’s On-the-Roof Gang: Volume I – Prelude to War by Matt Zullo

3 stars

On The Roof Gang is historical fiction based around real events and real characters. It’s about the U.S. naval men who were trained to work in radio listening posts across the Pacific in the prelude to World War Two and specifically the run-up to the Japanese/American declaration of war and the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

The premise of this story reminded me of films I had enjoyed set in this era, as well as the codes and coding element that links to my fascination with espionage. I was interested in how the men were trained to decipher the Japanese messages and transpose them, while the problems associated with setting up of listening posts where local radio signals hampered the listeners was an issue that I had never considered.

Matt Zullo is a retired U.S. Navy Master Chief Petty Officer who has more than 35 years’ experience in Radio Intelligence. According to his Amazon author bio, he is one of only a few quantifiable experts on the subject of the On-The-Roof-Gang. Matt’s naval knowledge shines through in this book
and I can see its appeal to fellow naval enthusiasts; however, I do think that to reach a wider audience the story needs more work to make it an entertaining piece of fictional writing. In its current format it reminds me of a naval report and all the many names and ranks just went over my head. For me there were too many mundane navy related details, but not enough memorable story parts set in the listening posts. What I also missed was any empathy and engagement with the characters, which I need to make a piece of fiction a delight to read. So overall, the story was great on the facts but the method of delivery, for fiction, needed more work.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book description

THE US NAVY’S ON-THE-ROOF GANG: VOLUME I – PRELUDE TO WAR is an historical novel based on the unknown true-life story of the “On-The-Roof Gang,” the U.S. Navy’s fledgling radio intelligence organization in the years leading up to World War II. It is based on the real life of Harry Kidder, a U.S. Navy radioman who first discovered and deciphered Japanese katakana telegraphic code while stationed in the Philippines in the 1920s, discovering the he was listening to Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) radio communications. Kidder strongly believed in the future of radio intelligence and a chance meeting with Lieutenant Laurance Safford led to the birth of the Navy’s Radio Intelligence community. Kidder taught others the nascent art of intercepting IJN communications on the roof of the Main Navy Building in Washington, DC. From 1928 to 1941, 176 Sailors and Marines attended this training and were then stationed as radio intercept operators around the Pacific. These men would become known as the On-The-Roof-Gang and were charged with keeping track of the IJN as they prepared for war with the United States. The circumstances of America’s entry into World War II hinged on the success or failure of the On-The-Roof-Gang, and Harry Kidder knew this. On-the-Roof-Gang: Prelude to War concludes with the “date which will live in infamy,” December 7, 1941.

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The US Navy's On-the-Roof Gang: Volume I - Prelude to War by [Matt Zullo]

Rosie’s #BookReview Team #RBRT THE LOST BLACKBIRD: An emotional dramas based on true life events by @LizaPerrat

Today’s team review is from Terry, she blogs here https://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

#RBRT Review Team

Terry has been reading The Lost Blackbird by Liza Perrat

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This book is certainly an eye-opener.  In the 1950s and 60s (and as late as 1970), children were taken from English children’s homes for a ‘better life’ in Australia.  Sometimes the children were orphans, other times they were in care because the parents were temporarily unable to look after them, and they were shipped off without parental consent.  A few were fortunate, and were adopted by families, but most were used as slave labour on farms, until they were sixteen, when they would be sent to cattle stations to serve an ‘apprenticeship’ – more slave labour.  Most suffered permanent separation from siblings and families in England.

This is the fictional story of Londoners Lucy and Charly Rivers who ended up in ‘care’ (a brutal, regimental establishment) after their mother was wrongly convicted of having killed their father.  When Charly was six and Lucy ten, they were put on a boat with many others, to sail to the other side of the world.

The story alternates between that of Lucy and Charly, who fare very differently.  I found Charly’s story absolutely fascinating, and it was so well written by Ms Perrat; it involved a slow brainwashing until by the time she was sixteen she was not sure what was a memory and what a fantasy or dream; the way in which she tried to capture fleeting images was perfectly illustrated, as was the behaviour of the people who perpetrated this; the gradual unravelling was riveting stuff.  Lucy’s story was so tragic and I was equally engrossed in the first two thirds or so, though I was less convinced by a couple of developments later on.

The book is certainly a page-turner, nicely structured, making me eager to know what would happen next, as hope twinkles in the distance for the characters, then disappears. The writing flows well, and I’d definitely recommend it to any readers who enjoy emotional dramas based on true life events – the fact that all this stuff actually happened gives a hugely compelling slant to the whole story.  At the end of the book, Ms Perrat writes about her research process, giving details of some of the books she used for reference, which has now added to my reading list, too!  I give her a round of applause for bringing these heinous crimes to light in this highly readable novel.

Book description

A powerful story of sisters cruelly torn apart by a shameful event in British-Australian history. Clare Flynn, author of The Pearl of Penang
London 1962. A strict and loveless English children’s home, or the promise of Australian sunshine, sandy beaches and eating fruit straight from the tree. Which would you choose?
Ten-year-old Lucy Rivers and her five-year-old sister Charly are thrilled when a child migrant scheme offers them the chance to escape their miserable past.
But on arrival in Sydney, the girls discover their fantasy future is more nightmare than dream.
Lucy’s lot is near-slavery at Seabreeze Farm where living conditions are inhuman, the flies and heat unbearable and the owner a sadistic bully. What must she do to survive?
Meanwhile Charly, adopted by the nurturing and privileged Ashwood family, gradually senses that her new parents are hiding something. When the truth emerges, the whole family crumbles. Can Charly recover from this bittersweet deception?
Will the sisters, stranded miles apart in a strange country, ever find each other again?
A poignant testament to child migrants who suffered unforgivable evil, The Lost Blackbird explores the power of family bonds and our desire to know who we are.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s ARC #Bookreview Of #Ya #Scifi QUANTUM MESSENGER by @CaitlinLynagh

Quantum Messenger (The Soul Prophecies Book 4) by [Caitlin Lynagh]Quantum Messenger by Caitlin Lynagh

4 stars

Quantum Messenger is a young adult science fiction story. Although part of a trilogy, the concept is that they can be read in any order like a never ending loop.

This is the story of Apollo, a robot in a futuristic world, and considers the idea of artificial intelligence. The story opens with Apollo’s introduction at a science conference. Then we join Apollo as he is employed by a street cleaning team where robots are part of everyday life for humans. Sadly, as malfunctions occur, Apollo suffers several regenerations into new robotic experiences.
However, during all of these, he shows signs of independent thinking, and begins to acknowledge human emotion, which raises many questions and ultimately leads to consideration of spirituality.

This is an interesting story, though one that took a while to grow on me. At first I was a little confused by its direction, and struggled with Apollo’s narrative style, but having completed the book I realise that it was all part of his character growth. My favourite regeneration tale was spent with
Josephine while other moments stood out too, like the piano playing. I was unsure at first where the ending was going, until the author offered a glimpse into the previous book, Another Path; now I’m left very intrigued indeed.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Book description

If Artificial Intelligence developed a soul, what would it do? Where would it go?

And after life, could it help the dead guide the living?

Apollo is the first of its kind – an AI Assistant who, along with millions of other robots, will help transform workplaces and households. Over a few short years, Apollo learns the wonders and cruelties of mankind. He rewrites his internal programming so that his responses and personal thoughts can be independent. He befriends, then betrays a child and has to learn about love in its purest sense. Apollo cultivates passions, pride, anger, sadness and ultimately forgiveness, all under the watchful eye of a being he can’t quite fathom out.

Is it something beyond his very being, or could it be his own conscience?

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Quantum Messenger (The Soul Prophecies Book 4) by [Caitlin Lynagh]