Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #RomCom HATE THE GAME by @hollyhallbooks

Today’s team review is from Wendy, she blogs here http://booklovercircumspect4.wordpress.com

#RBRT Review Team

Wendy has been reading Hate The Game by Holly Hall

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Hate the Game is a story about Ava, a relationship consultant by day,  single woman by night, who puts her heart into finding love for others. Ava, like all of us, has been hurt from a previous relationship and isn’t quite ready for love. So, you know what they say…..

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Sometimes when you least expect it, love comes right to your front door. It has never happened to me but I also do not live in an apartment building like Ava. Side note: one of things that made this book come to life for me is that it is set in the heart of Chicago. Coincidentally, I was actually in Chicago when I was reading this book, but lets get back to Ava…..Ava coincidentally runs into Theo in her apartment building one night after coming home from work.

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Ava is given an assignment at work that Theo’s career makes for an ideal opportunity for them to spend more time together and their relationship starts to bloom. However, nothing is as it seems……does love conquer all? You will have to read the book!

 

This book is very well written and the story line is very exciting. I really enjoyed reading this book as it had a plot twist I didn’t see coming. I give this book four stars.

Book description

My official title: Relationship Consultant. A modern-day, one-sided matchmaker. When I approach relationships like a formula, it’s simple really. If only I had the same success in my personal life.

My gorgeous neighbor turns me into a fumbling mess, and I don’t exactly match the leggy, model-types I’ve seen him with. Despite the fact that we’re total opposites, our chemistry is almost hot enough to convince me to give the dating game another shot. (Not to mention, it’s totally off-brand to be a relationship skeptic.)

What could it hurt to practice what I preach? After all, Theo Hartley would be a fun specimen to practice with. And if things go south—which is my luck—I just have to remember what I tell my clients:

don’t hate the player…

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #CrimeFiction THE PAPERBOY by @DianaJFebry

Today’s team review is from Cathy, she blogs here https://betweenthelinesbookblog.wordpress.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Cathy has been reading The Paperboy by Diane J. Febry

The Paperboy: A rural detective mystery (Peter Hatherall Mystery Book 6) by [Febry, Diana J]

This is a murder mystery with its roots in the past. Amanda Beresford is a single mother with a young son, Freddie. She is struggling to make ends meet and Freddie’s father is no help. While walking in the park one day with Freddie, in a seemingly random attack she is stabbed twice and her attacker flees without being caught.

In the 1990s Peter Hatherall was a young inexperienced police constable who, together with another constable, was sent to investigate the report of a missing boy. Jeff Powell had a paper round which he completed each morning before school, but on that particular morning the school telephoned his mother to say Jeff had failed to arrive. The two young officers were not prepared for what they found at a seemingly deserted and isolated farm near the village of Mickleburgh.

Back in the present, as Peter and his partner DCI Fiona Williams investigate the murder of Amanda Beresford, an old photograph is found at Amanda’s house which raises concerns for Peter. Despite the tragedy in his life at the time and the concerns he raised about the case, which resulted in his suspension, Peter has never completely forgotten his first major case. The doubts he had at the time about the validity of the conviction began to surface. The time has come for Peter to delve deeper into how the case was conducted all those years ago and find the connections between Jeff’s death and the murder of Amanda Beresford.

The look back at the young Peter added to his character development and both his and Fiona’s personal lives have changed over the course of the series. Reviewing the earlier case brings back bad memories for Peter. It also makes Fiona doubt Peter and question the reasons for his decisions. Her trust in him is tested almost to the limit.

A well crafted and intricate plot is written in the third person and comes from various perspectives, introducing several potential suspects, all who had motive. The two threads are woven together well as the investigation begins to uncover evidence and information that was either overlooked or discounted from the original murder. The only thing that didn’t quite gel for me was the later thought processes of the perpetrator, but other than that The Paperboy was another enjoyable addition to the series and I hope there’ll be more with Peter and Fiona.

Book description

A stand-alone murder mystery featuring DCI Peter Hatherall.
A young mother brutally stabbed in a busy park in front of her son.
A paperboy shot in an isolated farmhouse twenty-four years previously.
DI Fiona Williams is baffled when her senior officer, DCI Peter Hatherall makes a connection between the two cases.
As details of Hatherall’s involvement in the old case emerge, her loyalty is tested to breaking point and she starts to question his decisions.
When the murdered woman’s son does missing the time for hesitating is over.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #HistoricalFiction THE CONFESSOR’S WIFE by Kelly Evans

Today’s team review is from Terry, she blogs here https://terrytylerbookreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

#RBRT Review Team

Terry has been reading The Confessor’s Wife by Kelly Evans

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As more and more historical novels hit the virtual shelves, authors of the genre are digging deeper to find the lesser known characters to write about.  Edith was, as the title suggests, the wife of Edward the Confessor, one of the last Anglo-Saxon kings of England.  Edward was succeeded by Harold Godwinson, who was famously defeated by William of Normandy in 1066.

I enjoyed this – it’s a light sort of historical fiction that flows well, an ‘easy read’.  I don’t know much about the factual details of this time, but I did have a brief look online and it appears to be well-researched.  Also, the domestic details are presented well, with just enough information—I liked that there was none of the endless descriptive passages straight from the research notes that is present in some histfic; I never felt that I was reading the author’s research at all, which is always a plus.

On the slight downside there were times when I felt the dialogue was too modern, with the odd mild Americanism such as ‘snuck’ instead of ‘sneaked’, though they weren’t bad enough to make me stop reading.  My only other negative was problems with punctuation; either the author or her proofreader, or preferably both, need to learn about run-on sentences/comma splices; there were quite a lot of these, and the odd missing comma.  But, again, this was only mildly irritating.

This isn’t a book for the historical fiction purist or buff, but for those who are only after an enjoyable, light novel with some well-drawn characters and an interesting look back in time, I’d say it’s just the thing.

Book description

In the 11th Century, when barren wives are customarily cast aside, how does Edith of Wessex not only manage to stay married to King Edward the Confessor, but also become his closest advisor, promote her family to the highest offices in the land, AND help raise her brother to the throne? And why is her story only told in the footnotes of Edward’s history?

Not everyone approves of Edward’s choice of bride. Even the king’s mother, Emma of Normandy, detests her daughter-in-law and Edith is soon on the receiving end of her displeasure. Balancing her sense of family obligation with her duty to her husband, Edith must also prove herself to her detractors.

Edward’s and Edith’s relationship is respectful and caring, but when Edith’s enemies engineer her family’s fall from grace, the king is forced to send her away. She vows to do anything to protect her family’s interests if she returns, at any cost. Can Edith navigate the dangerous path fate has set her, while still remaining loyal to both her husband and her family?

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #NonFiction Junglenomics: Nature’s Solutions to the World Environment Crisis by Simon Lamb

Today’s team review is from Olga, she blogs here https://www.authortranslatorolga.com

#RBRT Review Team

Olga has been reading Junglenomics by Simon Lamb

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I must confess to feeling totally unequal to the task of reviewing this book. I did mention that to the author of the book, who insisted that it would be of interest to authors and to the general public, as well as to economist, and particularly to anybody interesting in preserving the environment and finding new (and workable) ways to do it.

I am not an expert in Evolution, Economics, and/or Environmental Sciences, and this book’s approach uses and builds on elements and concepts of all three, so my opinion is far from a knowledgeable one when it comes to evaluating it. All my comments about this book are, as are all reviews, only an expressional as my personal point of view, and in this case I feel particularly unqualified to make an in-depth analysis, as I lack the knowledge required and cannot debate the nitty-gritty details to be able to either agree or disagree with the research. Don’t get me wrong, the basic idea is easy to grasp, but, as usual, the devil is in the detail.

Junglenomics proposes using Nature’s blueprint —the way ecosystems work— to solve the environmental disaster we’re quickly approaching. The author uses evolutionary theory to illustrate how we have got to where we are, explaining that all species are hungry for resources, and that is a normal evolutionary trait. The fact that Homo Sapiens is more successful at it than the rest of the species in our planet, means that we have exploited and accumulated Earth’s resources beyond the point where Nature itself can counteract our actions and re-establish the balance. Although ecosystems can adjust to increases in one bio product or species in different ways, our disruption of our environment has been so quick and drastic, especially in the last couple of centuries that our recent attempts at redress seem to be too-little/too-late.

The author goes on to analyse both, the situation and the attempts at redress, noticing that most have been piecemeal and lacked in a consistent application, for a variety of reasons, but most of all, because rather than appealing to the market (money makes the world go around, let’s not forget, and Lamb makes a good case for how money came to be what it is, a stand-in for our hunger for resources), and trying to find solutions that make sense from an economic point of view (something that will either produce money or reduce costs, or both), so far the focus has been on penalising and restricting practices that, until now, have resulted in great profit and advancement for the markets. Getting a lot of nations, not only developed ones, but also developing nations (that feel they are bearing the brunt of such policies without any of the benefits Western developed nations had had years to reap) to sign up to agreements is difficult, and enforcing them is near impossible, as we have all seen. Rather than accusations and counter-accusations (and the author discusses in detail the reasons for the difficult relationships between ecologists and economists, but also points at some positive recent trends), a combined effort based on a new perspective and understanding of the issues could be the way forward.

This is a book full of gems and information (some totally new to me, and other that I had only heard about in passing), and although what I’ve said might make it sound as if the text deals only in generalities, nothing is further from the truth. The author looks at all (or most) aspects of the question, from climate change (noticing that there is now an extreme focus on that to the detriment of the rest of the imbalances in the ecosystem equation), to waste management (not only factories but also human and animal), not forgetting the pollution of the seas, and the depletion of certain animal species, to name just a few. He highlights organisations, programmes, schemes, industries, and even countries (Costa Rica gets the gold star) that have found workable solutions to some of the problems, proposes specific ways to deal with issues such as funding (issuing bonds, and he mentions war bonds and the similarities with the situation we are in now), the need to find international organizations to monitor the implementation of such plans, and also, the importance of coordinating the efforts and working together at a supranational level.

I am not sure if I am a sceptical who tries hard to give new (and idealistic) proposals a chance, or I’m a dreamer trying hard to be a sceptical. In any case, as I was reading the book, I couldn’t help but write down many of my ideas and my objections/questions in relation the content, and was pleasantly surprised when I discovered that most of them were tackled by the author, who has done much research and has tried to be as even-handed as possible, presenting always the two sides of any argument, and also dealing with the possible criticism and objections. Although his attitude is never complacent and he points out the facts, he does not point the finger of blame at individuals (while he praises those he feels are already applying a Junglenomic-like approach), and despite his realism, he remains optimistic and encouraging.

As I said, I don’t know enough about Economics or Environmental Sciences to offer an informed opinion as to how successful a model Junglenomics would be. It made me think, and at a completely untrained level, the suggestions make sense, although implementing them would be as complicated as the author already envisages. This is clearly a labour of love and much time and effort has gone into the creation of the book and the theoretical/philosophical/practical approach behind it.

Regarding the style of the book, it is not an easy book to read. It is a very ambitious text, and it seems to try to be all things to all people. It does contain some examples and anecdotes to try to make it accessible to all (and it has great quotes in all the chapters), but it also contains tonnes of footnotes, and detailed disquisitions on subjects that are quite specialized, sharing much in common with academic texts (there is an index at the end, and illustrations, charts and diagrams to explain some of the concepts). I kept thinking that a non-expert reader might benefit from more of the examples and stories (we like stories), while if the book is addressed at policy-makers and analysts (both Ecologists and Economists) they wouldn’t necessarily care for the basic explanations. Perhaps two versions, or two separate texts, might achieve both, to reach a wider audience and raise awareness, and to also get into the hands of the people likely to be able to influence policies and induce change. I am sure it would make for a very compelling documentary in the right hands. I’d recommend possible readers to check a sample of the book to decide if they think it would be a good fit for them.

At an anecdotal level, I observed that many of the studies mentioned come from the UK and the European Union (probably down to availability of studies and familiarity with the material, although it does reflect the true situation of the research as well); I wondered about the use of words such as “benign” (it might depend on one’s perspective or definition) and also about the fact that despite trying to be as inclusive and non-Eurocentric as possible, there are topics that are culture-sensitive (the issue of the kinds of animal products used in Chinese Medicine, which he discusses, although I couldn’t help but notice that he uses rabbits as an example of an animal most people would only eat in dire circumstances. I don’t eat any meat, but rabbit is regularly grown for food and eaten in Spain, and I’m sure in other countries as well). I’ve always wondered, when it comes to Ecology, if we can truly observe the ecosystem we’re a part of in any objective manner (we are, indeed, part of the problem, and we know about the observer’s paradox), but…

In summary, this is a book that requires a dedicated reader, keen on digging beyond the surface into the topic of how to save the environment, taking as an example the way ecosystems work (symbiotic relationships in particular) and using sound market strategies. I’ve learned a great deal from it, and I thought I’d leave you with the last quote from the book, a particularly relevant one when it comes to this topic:

I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do something I can do. Edward Everett Hale

You only need to think of Greta Thunberg (that the author mentions as well).

Book description

For all the occasional good news stories, the inescapable fact is that the natural world remains in a spiral of decline. If our children are not to inherit a world decimated by the industrial excesses of our generation, then clearly something fundamental has to change, but what? The good news, Simon Lamb argues, is that Nature itself provides a clear blueprint. It shows us how to reorganise the economic domain to protect and benignly coexist with natural environments, halt species decline and benefit the poorest. Junglenomics is the result of 25 years of research and insight. It provides a new vision of a future world rescued from decline, gained through an understanding of the profound forces at work in modern economies.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #HistoricalRomance THE MERMAID AND THE BEAR by @AilishSinclair #TuesdayBookBlog

Today’s team review is from Shelley, she blogs here https://shelleywilsonauthor.com/

#RBRT Review Team

Shelley has been reading The Mermaid And The Bear by Ailish Sinclair

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What a beautiful book! Historical romance is not my preferred genre to read but I’m committed to stepping out of my reading rut and was hooked in by the blurb and promise of faery castles and misty locks. I was swept up by Isobell’s story and the flow of the prose.

The plot was well developed and follows Isobell’s story as she sails to Scotland to escape a wicked man. We’re introduced to a colourful cast of characters from the motherly cook, Bessie Thom, to the charismatic Thomas Manteith whose combined actions lull you into a false sense of contentment. As I was reading about the joyous developments for Isobell there was this undercurrent that told me something was about to change.

The twist at the end was brutal, graphic, and yes, I shed a tear or two. I’ve always been fascinated by the stories of the witchcraft trials, and to see how easy it was for lives to be changed forever is quite sobering. Fabulously descriptive, The Mermaid and The Bear was a delight to read. There were moments when I felt like I’d stepped into an episode of Outlander, which is no bad thing. The Scottish phrases adding to the beauty of the story.

I may have found a new favourite genre!

5 stars.

Book description

Isobell needs to escape. She has to. Her life depends on it.

She has a plan and it’s a well thought-out, well observed plan, to flee her privileged life in London and the cruel man who would marry her, and ruin her, and make a fresh start in Scotland.

She dreams of faery castles, surrounded by ancient woodlands and misty lochs… and maybe even romance, in the dark and haunted eyes of a mysterious Laird.

Despite the superstitious nature of the time and place, her dreams seem to be coming true, as she finds friendship and warmth, love and safety. And the chance for a new beginning…

Until the past catches up with her.

Set in the late sixteenth century, at the height of the Scottish witchcraft accusations, The Mermaid and the Bear is a story of triumph over evil, hope through adversity, faith in humankind and – above all – love.

AmazonUK | AmzonUS

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #Superheroes #ShortStory MY NEW SUPERJOB by @AntonEine

Today’s team review is from Karen, she blogs here https://mytrainofthoughtson.wordpress.com

#RBRT Review Team

Karen has been reading My New Superjob by Anton Eine

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This book focuses on an interview between “Mark” and Samantha, the latter being in dire need of a paying job.

With “My New Superjob”, Anton Eine has created a very funny short story with more than a superhero touch. The story was initially planned to be just one short story – this would have been our (the readers’) loss. This short story comprises two believable characters with sufficient depth and hilarious dialogue. I had a great time reading “My New Superjob” – it is a very fun read. I was drawn into the story right away, getting closer to Samantha, page by page. I am looking forward to reading more!

This is for you if you like female protagonists, great – and fun – dialogue, as well as the superhero topic.

A fun and somehow suspenseful short story to read again; it is the very promising first in a new series.

Recommended.

Book description

Did you ever want to be a superhero? The city’s defender against crime, violence, and all forms of sicko nastiness?
When one day she stumbled upon a strange help wanted ad claiming that the city was looking for a superhero, Samantha Washington, a former Ranger commander, was sure it was a joke. And she sent in her resume.
Will the ad turn out to be somebody’s dumb idea of a joke, a practical stunt, a cunning maniac’s clever trap, or… a real opportunity leading to a difficult and dangerous future occupation?
Now that she has let herself be drawn inextricably into the chain of events, Samantha will have to figure it all out on her own. And she’ll have to do it face to face with her own deepest fears.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #Contemporary #Fiction NOT KNOWING by @donnadechen

Today’s team review is from Karen, she blogs here https://mytrainofthoughtson.wordpress.com

#RBRT Review Team

Karen has been reading Not Knowing by Donna Dechen Birdwell

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This book focuses on archaeologist Meg Fitzellen, spending her summer at ‘her’ Mayan ruin site in Belize; for her, digging in ancient history is more pleasant than reminders of her own past. Insights and Belizean events still have an influence on her after returning home to Texas.

With “Not Knowing”, Donna Dechen Birdwell has created a nicely developing and intense story about Meg Fitzellen. The story comprises a variety of characters with sufficient depth, interesting turns, archaelogical knowledge, and has a good flow. I was drawn into the story right away, close to Meg and Seth; captivated by what their story had to offer. I had a good time reading “Not Knowing” – also a great source of food for thought.

“Not Knowing” may be categorised ‘Contemporary Women’s Fiction’ – it offers a lot more. I enjoyed the human touch, the dreams, as well as the little mysteries; a story not easily forgotten.

This is for you if you like female protagonists, stories that let you follow along and inspire your own train of thoughts, as well as books you would like to read again.

Recommended.

Book description

When Meg was a little girl, Abuela María predicted she would travel to the moon.

Now she’s an archaeologist digging up Mayan ruins in Belize while trying to keep her own past buried beneath hard work and professional responsibility. It isn’t working. The summer of 2022 seems destined to push all of Meg’s buttons—her deep-seated aversion to marijuana and guns and the unwanted presence of a boy who reminds her of a certain horrific summer in Mexico. Digging deeper only unearths more questions. And then her husband buys a lottery ticket for the first tourist flight to the moon. What Meg doesn’t want to know may yet be her redemption.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT Women’s Action Adventure FOOL’S GOLD by @PJSkinnerAuthor

Today’s team review is from Karen, she blogs here https://mytrainofthoughtson.wordpress.com

#RBRT Review Team

Karen has been reading Fool’s Gold by P.J. Skinner

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This book focuses on geologist Sam; in need of a job she accepts an offer that takes her to the rainforests of Sierramar, to an adventure that gets her in some unanticipated situations.

With “Fool’s Gold”, PJ Skinner has created a slowly yet steadily developing adventure around Sam Harris. The story comprises a variety of characters with sufficient depth, drama, surprising turns which are solved as the story continues, and interesting geological/archaeological passages. I had a good time reading “Fool’s Gold” – it is the beginning of a promising series. I was drawn into the story having finished the first chapter, already getting closer to Sam.

This is for you if you like female protagonists, characters with an agenda, and slower-paced (yet not too slow) adventures.

A promising first book in a new series.

Recommended.

Book description

Indiana Jones wannabe finds adventure a little tougher than she expected.

It’s 1987. Geologist Sam Harris is a woman in a man’s world – naive and underpaid, but resilient and passionate. Desperate for her first job, she accepts a contract with a dodgy entrepreneur exploring for gold in the remote rainforests of Sierramar.

When she uncovers a clue to a treasure buried deep within the jungle, she is sent on an expedition to find it, but one of her colleagues is plotting to seize the hoard and will kill to get his hands on it.

Will Sam find the treasure or will her first adventure be her last?

If you like gutsy heroines, exotic locations, and complex characters, then you’ll love PJ Skinner’s thrilling novel.

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT Cosy #Mystery MURDER AT THE COLUMBARIUM by @TheEmilyGallo @ImChrisBarboza #TuesdayBookBlog

Today’s team review is from Sean, he blogs here https://ebookwormssite.wordpress.com

#RBRT Review Team

Sean has been reading Murder At The Columbarium by Emily Gallo

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Summary:

This is an interesting whodunnit story, which has a number of other threads running through it.

Main Characters:

Jed Gibbons: Sixty-something African-American, curator of a Columbarium (a building where funeral urns are stored).

Monica: His wife, positively diagnosed with HIV.

Minor Characters:

Dutch: Sixty-something grower of legal weed.

Juniper: Dutch’s live-in companion, and overseer of his farming operations.

Malcolm: Long-time friend of Jed and Monica.

Tony: Another friend, roughly the same age as Jed, who covers for him at the Columbarium when he needs to travel to investigate.

Plot:

Jed arrives at work, and discovers the body of a Pakistani woman on the grounds, along with her still-breathing little baby girl. He immediately calls the police, and the novel is up and running.

Jed is of course a person of interest, and he quickly gets sucked into the police investigation process, initially to prove his innocence, then fired by his desire to foster the little girl, that he and Monica name Aja.

While the murder investigation gathers pace in the novel, normal life also goes on, and we get an insight into the relationships and world that Jed and Monica have. They are particularly close to Malcolm and his partner Savali, who is undergoing gender transition. They are struggling to cope with the impending closure of the old folks home they are running, and the need to place their residents. This has no direct impact on the investigation, but the threads are neatly pulled together by the end.

As a result of Jed’s amateur work, he is led to weed-farmers Dutch and Juniper, who become good friends, even though they run a personal risk. His work also unearths less savoury characters, and Jed relies on the police and FBI for support.

Throughout all this, we see the tensions rise between Jed and Monica over Aja, their shared hopes and dreams, and the practicality of two sixty-somethings raising an infant.

What I Liked:

  • It is more than a simple whodunnit. We get a real sense of people at a point in time, their lives, and how they deal with change and stress.
  • The multiplicity of topics raised – racism (both direct and indirect), importance of family, different moral viewpoints on cultural issues, etc.
  • The plotline was excellent, with some surprising twists, and there was some strong character development in Jed and Monica.

 

What I Didn’t Like:

  • There was obviously a preceding book, as there are references to events that happened previously, and characters who are mentioned but not “seen. This did throw the story for me a little, because I couldn’t see where those characters/events helped this novel.
  • There were a couple of scenes that were too domestic, in that the conversation was desultory, and nothing happened to move the story along.

 

Overall:

I found it a pleasant read, well-structured and reasonably paced. There are a lot of sub-issues addressed, but there is no high moral ground taken. The issues are raised as being normal, and treated by the characters in that way, with pros and cons. It will please fans of the amateur detective genre, as it hits all the touchpoints. Definitely recommend.

Book description

Jed’s quiet life as caretaker of the San Francisco Columbarium is turned upside down when he comes upon a dead woman’s body and a crying baby just inside the gate. His search for answers thrusts him into a world of corruption, bigotry and drug trafficking and he becomes one of the principal suspects.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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Rosie’s #Bookreview Team #RBRT #RomCom ABOUT FACE by @dehaggerty

Today’s team review is from Sandra.

#RBRT Review Team

Sandra has been reading About Face by D.E. Haggerty

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Having previously read and enjoyed DE Haggerty’s Not So Reluctant Detective series, I was pleased to be able to read and review About Face.

After a serious car crash, Frankie is recuperating in the suburbs at her grandparents’ house. She is now facing months of physiotherapy to enable her to walk again on her injured leg. As a distraction, her grandma tries to set her up with her friends’ grandsons, much to Frankie’s dismay (and our amusement).

Brodie is her physio and when she asks him to pretend to be her date, to stop Grandma inviting any more weirdos to dinner, he surprises her by asking her out for real. Frankie is on a steep learning curve, gradually coming to terms with how shallow her life and her friends were before her accident. It turns out they were not true friends after all. With the support of her grandma, her assistant, Jackson, and her new friends Shelby and Brodie, will she be able to move on?

The story is narrated in the first person so we only get Frankie’s view of what’s happening. I would have quite liked a bit of insight into what some of the other characters were thinking. My only slight criticism is that I would have expected the writer to fill in some of the backstory about the car accident. Frankie seems a bit fixated on her facial scar and takes a lot of convincing that it’s not the first thing people notice about her, but I suppose that’s only to be expected. I also thought that Francis was the male version of her name, but maybe that’s only in the UK? There is a lot of humour, and a cinematic quality to the story – it made a great rom-com. I also hope we hear more about Shelby in another book.

Thanks to the author for a copy that I review on behalf of Rosie’s Book Review Team.

Book description

My grandma is trying to hook me up.

To be painfully specific, my seventy-five-year-old grandmother thinks a little hanky-panky would cheer me up. Direct quote. Since I’m currently living with her, I can’t escape the endless line of grandchildren of friends who keep ‘dropping by’ for dinner. Literally, I can’t escape. I can barely manage the trek to the dining room at this point.

While Grandma’s determined to find me a husband, I’m determined to learn how to walk again so I can walk away from her matchmaking skills. Spoiler alert: She has no matchmaking skills.

But then I get a brilliant idea. I can fake date my physical therapist. Only he wants a real date. Gulp. A real date with me? Is he for real? I’m no longer the stylish girl with the glamorous job. Now, I’m a woman with a shattered leg and a scarred face.

If I’m going to learn to live with my new reality and give love a chance, my attitude needs to do an about face. Easier said than done.

AmazonUK | AmazonUS

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