#Bookblogger bashing: in the end, you’re only hurting yourself #MondayBlogs

Today I’m hosting a post written by Terry Tyler which I feel strongly about aswell.

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#Bookblogger bashing: in the end, you’re only hurting yourself.

I’ve read a few posts lately about book bloggers being bullied or ‘trolled’ by writers for whom they have received bad reviews, or whose books they have rejected.  For more on this, here’s a heartrending post from The Happy Meerkat, and an associated one on Fictionophile about whether or not reviews should be objective or personal opinion, amongst other things.

Like 99% of the rest of the online writer/reader/blogger/reviewer community, I’m appalled that bloggers who give up their time to read books by total strangers, for no payment, are receiving such harassment.

I write this from the point of view of a writer, and a book reviewer.  Although my own book review blog is mostly for my own reading choices, I’m also a member of Rosie Amber’s Book Review Team. There are 20-30 of us, who select books from those submitted by authors and publishers.  If we’ve reviewed the book (and we sometimes decline after reading a section), we then deliver the results to Rosie for inclusion on her blog.

On the submission guidelines, Rosie clearly states that we don’t provide a 5* only book review service, and that we pride ourselves on being honest, unbiased, balanced and constructive.  If we were to give only praise for every book submitted, the blog would be a) dishonest and b) therefore not worth reading.  Yet still she’s had to deal with complaints from writers who haven’t received the glowing recommendations for which they’d hoped. Some ask her not to post them, despite the hours of (unpaid) work that have gone into considering the submission, reading the book and posting the reviews.

Book bloggers are a gift to the self-published or indie press published author.  They do what they do simply for the love of reading/blogging/the book world.  They should not be given a hard time because they do not give a wholehearted, 5* thumbs up to what they’ve read.  Since being on Rosie’s team, I’ve heard of reviewers being accused of personal grudges against the author, lack of understanding of the author’s apparent brilliance, snobbery, and even not reading the book. A couple of years ago, one writer was extraordinarily rude, on Goodreads, about Rosie’s 3* review.  He slagged her off in public. She didn’t owe him anything.  He wasn’t paying her for her time.  He submitted his book for an honest review, which he received.  All he did was make himself look like an egotistical idiot.  Less than positive reactions are a fact of life for a writer. All reviews bring the book to the attention of the public and add to its ‘visibility’ on Amazon.

To book blogger bashers everywhere: have you ever watched The X Factor, or American Idol, or any of those shows?  You know the mediocre singer who can’t cope with the fact that he isn’t good enough to make it through to the next round, and is abusive towards the judges?  That’s what you look like when you harass book bloggers who don’t tell you what a wonderful writer you are.

The book blogger community is close and supportive.  If you start throwing your toys out of your pram every time you get a 1, 2 or 3* review, you’re likely to get a bad reputation.

Reading Soft edge

(Please note: in the following section, I’ve referred to the book blogger as ‘she’, rather than ‘he/she’, for simplicity).

If a book blogger rejects your submission it might be for any of these reasons:

  • You have sent a generic request rather than looking at the blog to see if your book is suitable.
  • You have come across as demanding, or unprofessional, or not even bothered to find out her name.
  • She has a busy life and does not have the time to read it right now.
  • Her to-read list is ten miles long already.
  • She is not interested in your particular genre.
  • She has read the blurb, and the subject matter of your book doesn’t appeal to her.
  • She has read the blurb and considers it badly written.
  • She’s read the ‘look inside’ sample on Amazon and does not consider the writing to be of the standard she wishes to review.

All these elements can be summed up by this: she doesn’t want to read your book.  That’s okay.  She’s not obliged to.

If a book blogger accepts your book, but gives it a less than positive review, it’s for this reason only:

  • She didn’t think it was very good.

She’s not being snobbish, or vindictive, and she’s not too stupid to understand your art, she just didn’t like it much, for the reasons stated.  Most book bloggers assess with a combination of objectivity and personal opinion.  If more than two reviewers say the book has unrealistic dialogue, or cardboard characters, or an unfeasible plot, or it’s too long, or it needs editing, or proofreading, it’s likely that they’ve got a point.  Deal with it. Learn from it.

But, most of all, don’t give the book blogger a hard time for pointing it out. It’s arrogant, it’s nasty, and, in the long run, the only person who will suffer is YOU.

158 thoughts on “#Bookblogger bashing: in the end, you’re only hurting yourself #MondayBlogs

  1. As a poet, I agree that one should never criticise a book reviewer. Book reviewers do, as you say, give up their time to read a writer’s work. Having said that, I have been annoyed when one particular reviewer reviewed one of my books and (several times) misquoted a number of my poems in their review. If someone reviews a book it is important that they carefully read their review through prior to posting it to check that it is accurate in all respects (including not misquoting the author they are reviewing). In this instance I thanked the reviewer for their review (simply thanked them and didn’t offer any criticism). Kevin

    Liked by 2 people

  2. An excellent piece from Terry, with which I wholeheartedly concur. Reviewers take no pleasure in reaching the conclusion that a book isn’t worth a four or five star rating. I try to focus on the positive aspects but if I’m not honest in my assessment, then my review is devalued and readers will not trust my judgement in future.

    Liked by 4 people

  3. Thank you, Terry and Rosie. There are very few books I’ve declined to read and I always try to say something positive about it when I do. And I’m aware that a review is part objective,part subjective. But, as a writer, I always try to look at the reviews I get for my books as learning curves. The one thing I would say to authors who have a ‘less than great’ review, is to read it carefully, take a few deep breaths, learn from it… and move on.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. Staggered by what’s going on. How childish! I quote the benefit of book reviewing sites in my latest blog….and recommend them highly, especially this one. I’ve been turned down by a site ~ my books didn’t fit into their reviewing criteria. Fair enough. I’d also presume if someone was going to give me a totally naff review, they’d let me know anyway. I support book reviewers and those who host writers on their blogs. ‘Every Little helps’.

    Liked by 4 people

  5. Thank you! This is such an important post and I appreciate the link back to my own. I cannot believe you yourself Rosie have had to deal with this and in public too. These authors need to realise that not everyone will love their work. I’ve given lower ratings to a few books and if anything it’s sparked interest and some people have told me they want to read the book even though my own rating wasn’t high. A book with nothing but 5star reviews ends up looking suspicious. Not one big famous author has a 100% 5 star rating. Thank you again :).

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Very well said Terry and Rosie, I find it astonishing that anyone would be so abusive to someone giving up their time to read and review their work. They clearly have no understanding of just how valuable book bloggers are or of the damage they are causing to their own reputation.

    Liked by 4 people

  7. Programmes like the X Factor have a lot to answer for. I haven’t watched it much, but it’s embarrassing to watch people protest that they’re more talented than the judges realise. Worse, they’re sometimes encouraged to do so by the audience.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks April, in the book world, authors enjoy support from friends and family for their work, however reviews from the wider reading audience can be more honest, but need a braver face to sort through.

      Liked by 4 people

      • My family and friends offer little support; most don’t acknowledge that I write. Therefore, I appreciate anyone who takes the time to read my books, whether she likes the stories or not! A book reviewer/blogger is an intelligent, well-read person, whose opinion should be respected.

        Liked by 2 people

    • I agree, April. I think the ‘I want to be famous’ extends to all fields of the arts, with some thinking it’s easy to become so. The ‘culture of encouragement’ has a lot to answer for, too, with people not daring to criticise.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Very well articulated. I’ve only been on the receiving end of this once and it was a while ago, but it was very unpleasant. Mine was actually a signed author and things got so bad the publisher actually phoned me to apologise!

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Well said, Terry and Rosie – authors should focus on appreciating the time and effort that goes into reviews for blogs and not expect their book will be to everyone’s taste. If we all had totally similar tastes it would be rather restrictive and boring. (Have shared on Twitter and FB)

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Terry refused to review my THE VISITOR book and the points she made were passed on to me by Rosie who did review it and gave it 3.5 stars on Amazon. As part of that review, Rosie said the book needed another thorough edit to take it to the next level.

    That was some months ago and I took a long hard look at my own writing, buying Rayne Hall’s “Word Loss Diet” and getting critiques on SFF Chronicles and other sites.

    I soon saw that my writing really was that bad and I have now taken the Writer’s Workshop course which is incredibly useful.

    Since then I have re-edited that book and also gone back to my original book and rewritten huge chunks of it.

    I remember being told that when you think you have finished a book, you are actually only 25% of the way.

    As a non-fiction writer who self-published and sold thousands through retailers, I thought it was normal to self-publish when you finished writing a book to get reviews. However, while it might be okay with non-fiction you can sell to shops, it is MOST CERTAINLY A BAD IDEA to do so with science fiction. Despite removing my books from sale, they still stay on Amazon and Goodreads in their original format and even though shown as not available, you can read the, frankly, crappy ‘look inside’ text which I now cringe at.

    This information needs to be got over to aspiring writers somehow and Create Space, LuLu and the like are doing a huge disservice to new writers by allowing their catalogues to be filled with writing which is not worth reading.

    I still can’t get The Visitor removed from Amazon and that is very sad. It looks as if I’m going to have to put up still not perfect work to replace the original so that ‘see inside’ at least shows the latest version.

    Anyway, I see why Terry didn’t want to review it and thank Rosie for her review which set me on the WRITE track!

    I do find Wattpad useful for getting comments and trial my changes up there.

    Sorry this comment is so long – dare say it could be edited … LOL.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Thank you Tony. For folks reading, I sometimes offer “feedback” to authors over and above a review or a refusal to review. This can be seen as brave or stupid as it goes one of two ways, Tony’s way or the crash and burn, toy throwing out of the pram way. Why do I do it? I can’t help wanting to get people writing the best books they can.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Thanks for being a reasonable person, Tony! And we all have to learn, and keep on learning. I think the problem with Amazon Kindle is that too many people rush to get their books out there, without thinking about whether or not that book is the one they want to be seen as their debut novel. When asked what advice I’d give to new writers, I always say ‘don’t rush to publish’. This is what it means. It’s rare that a first novel is good enough. Mine certainly weren’t. My first few novels have stayed where they are, in folders!

        Re Amazon, you can unpublish, it’s easy – just look on your KDP account. You just click the three little dots at the side of ‘Promote and advertise’ and it gives the ‘unpublish’ option. As for Goodreads, it’s not hard to take it down from there, either.

        Liked by 5 people

  11. Pingback: When does “NO” really mean “YES”? #Bookblogger #MondayBlog #RBRT | Barb Taub

  12. I guess I have been lucky so far with only one hissy-fit author who insisted I had to write and publish a review everywhere to substantiate my 1 star DNF Goodreads rating of his story. Fortunately his five-emails-a-day campaign abruptly ceased after I did exactly that.
    Most authors are lovely though and several of my top ten books of the past few years were indie authored so there definitely is polished talent out there

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Yes! I’ve had authors try to explain various points to me that they think I didn’t understand (publicly, on Twitter; it’s mainly men who do this,) and I’ve had to try and stay calm while I explain to them that yes, I did understand it. No, I still didn’t like that particular aspect. I don’t even give star ratings, lord knows what would happen if I did.

    I’ve also had an author who I’m pretty sure was mocking my Wenglish (Welsh/English slang) way of speaking… I chose to pretend I hadn’t noticed.

    Liked by 1 person

      • ‘Praise’ hmmmm… some thank me. Some don’t. Very few praise my reviews, because I’m one of those pesky reviewers who will discuss both the good points and the bad points of the books I review – I firmly believe no book is perfect, and my duty is to the reader, and being fair and open. Praise has come occasionally – but it tends to be from publicists, who seem to know its value more than authors do!

        Liked by 2 people

      • No book is perfect, because creativity is imperfect. All true artists realize that and accept their limitations. We do the best we can with what we have–and, in the process, try to tell a good story.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Excellent post. Thank you, Rosie and Terry. I’m shocked readers behave like that. Don’t ask for your novel to be reviewed if you don’t want to know the truth. May I say, I admire Tony for accepting and learning from the help you gave him. I have been lucky with reviews, but as an Indie author I have my novels critiqued (good notes, or bad, I work until I’ve got it right). I edit and edit, until I think it’s ready, then I have it professionally proofread. As an Independent author I want my novels to be as good as those that are published traditionally. An honest review, however good, always has some negative comments that I learn from. Grateful thanks to you for taking the time to review and Blog our novels.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Great post on a topic which affects so many reviewers. I’d already read The Happy Meerkat’s posts about the problems she was having. I wonder if any of the ‘toys-out-of-pram’ brigade actually recognise themselves – or do they think their behaviour is perfectly reasonable and it is the stupid reviewers at fault?!

    Liked by 3 people

  16. I had an author offend me on twitter recently after giving a 3* review. I had explained that it wasn’t my genre and it was a good book and had really wanted to love it but because I called it ‘girly’ she didn’t see anything else. She could have sent an email or dm rather than actually make a crude statement. I liked her comment, nearly replied saying you win some you loose some but didn’t want a word war. Truth is I had alot worse I could have said about the book but I took 3 weeks to figure out how to diplomatically write a review. Best part is, I had bought the book myself I hadn’t even been sent it so dread to think what would have been said had I been sent it.

    Liked by 2 people

      • Exactly! It was a perfectly fine book, the characters weren’t written as if she had any investment in them – very weakly written but I never stated this in my review instead I focused on the positives and recommended it to anyone who was interested in that genre. Infact Amazon had folks saying a heck of alot worse than I wrote. I don’t want to only be seen as someone who hands out 4* and 5* in every review I’d rather be seen as honest. I have also had an author tell me life is too short to read a book I don’t enjoy and leave it because I had found it hard to get into and because she was so nice I kept going and ended up loving the book it just was just a case of I was struggling with other personal things hense not being able to get into it.

        Liked by 3 people

      • 100% Terry! Think back to school when teachers would say this isn’t right, that needs editing and so on but once you got over the shock you realise they were right. Same with editors, publishers, proofreaders, betareading and so on…well so long as you aren’t so far up your own backside….

        Liked by 2 people

  17. Excellent article Tery and I think it makes the point very well, that book bloggers like yourself almost invariably give responsible, considered, thoughtful reviews using a mix of objective criteria and subjective opinions, which they flag up quite clearly. The opposite is thoughtless destructive quickfire reviews on Amazon and Goodreads which I think sometimes (sometimes, note) authors are right to be fed up about.All they do is drag the star rating down an resolve nothing. But anyway, why is there all this blogger bashing – surely there are more important things in the world to get in a rage about than a bunch of volunteer enthusiasts trying to share their discoveries?

    Liked by 2 people

    • I don’t think we can moan about thoughtless, destructive quick fire ones, either, to be honest – if you put your work on a public forum that allows criticism, we can’t complain – and we don’t moan about the two word reviews if they’re good!!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • I agree, Jessica. Some readers enjoy being mean, and that’s reflected in their reviews. Bona fide book bloggers never insult an author. They write reasonable, honest critiques of the author’s story, to which they’ve given much consideration. And therein lies the difference…

      Liked by 2 people

  18. I sometimes feel that some authors don’t see us as humans with a life, feelings etc, they see us book bloggers as a tool to get them that all important 4/5 star rating. Some also think that it is our job to review their book(s), and how dare we turn them down.
    They don’t seem to understand that in a day we get numerous emails from authors requesting a review. Yesterday alone I had 12 requests.
    If I say yes to everyone, I’m not sure if I would ever work, eat, sleep, look after my kids etc as well as read, and blog. I just can’t do it, even with a team of reviewers.

    I also tell authors upfront that we don’t just give 4/5 star reviews, and that the reviews are honest, unbiased, and final. Whether they like them or not. They are then given the opportunity to decide whether to go ahead or not with the request.

    I like Terry do have some reasons for turning review requests down, even before I have read their request.
    Don’t call me by someone else’s name, that really irritates me, and you get an automatic ‘no’.
    Don’t send me a request that you have sent to 30 other people. It does show at the top of the email that it is a mass email, and the ‘hi’ ‘yo’ (yes I’ve had this), are clear way to get a no, too.
    Grammar/spelling – if you can’t spell in your request, what is your book going to be like!!
    Lastly sending an email where it is one long piece of writing. No breaks, paragraphs, sentences. grrr

    I’m quite lucky in the sense that I’ve only had one author have a go when I refused to review her books. She told me that her work was far superior to others, and I must be stupid (yes she actually called that). She got a ‘have a nice day’ reply, and then blocked.

    I’ve got 1 star rating’s on the blog, and all of the authors have been lovely about them, and could understand where I the reviewer was coming from with their review.

    On a side note, I don’t understand authors who ask for a review when their book has multiple 1 or 2 star ratings only. One author who contacted me had 4 one star ratings, and 8 two star ratings, and nothing higher. Did they really thing that if that many people had rated it so low, that I was going to come in with a five star review – very doubtful. Especially when the reviewers were criticising the grammar, spelling, names changing part way through, etc.

    99.9% of authors though are lovely, decent people, and I love working with them. I find it a privilege to be reading their book(s) before they go on sale, and value my opinion.

    Anyway I’ll get off my soap box and leave you all in peace 🙂

    *Sorry for the long post*

    Liked by 3 people

    • Very interesting. I had to laugh at your disgruntled author saying, Have a nice day. Having the last word was obviously important to her. I don’t know whether to think stupid person, or feel sorry for her/him. On a serious note, there is no reason for poor grammar, spelling, name changing,etc. There are professionals out there who, if you are not sure yourself, will help you. Yes, for a fee, because they are professionals!

      Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks Stacy, I think much of social media has made many people forget the human behind the keyboard.
      I agree that having only 1 & 2* ratings for a book with the comments you mentioned, that that particular author couldn’t see there was a problem with the writing. I have seen this with someone trying to write in English which wasn’t their first language, but they would still be better off with a could editor/ proofreading package to solve those issues.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Stacey, a round of applause to you. And yes – I think some do forget that you actually have a life, and think you’re there just to bump up their 4/5* review ratings!!!!

      Liked by 3 people

  19. I must be incredibly naive as I didn’t realise that this sort of thing went on!

    You guys do a brilliant job – I read all your reviews and take them as honest and open, which is why I read them in the first place! It’s such a shame that people are taking time to be so negative…

    Liked by 3 people

  20. Amen to that! I received a particularly rancorous response from a woman whose book I reviewed. Four out of five lovely paragraphs and one with the parts of the book I considered needing work and she took me to task for it. I pride myself on constructive criticism so I was not only angry, but hurt. After all, I received no monetary perks for the reading, book review and interview questions. If you’re gonna write, you’ve got to expect criticism, otherwise keep your stuff to yourself! 😘 Thanks for voicing my frustration.🙏

    Liked by 2 people

  21. Just know that all of you are greatly appreciated by this author and many others. I am in awe of the selflessness of book bloggers everywhere who do an amazing amount of work in order to support authors. I always smile when on twitter, I run across a tweet from Rosie’s team, doing their utmost to help someone’s book stand out from the crowd.

    Liked by 3 people

  22. Amen, Terry and to all the comments. I’ve had a strange comment to one of my reviews on Amazon (not from the author, who is well-known and I’m sure not worried about such things, and the review was good anyway), but it seemed to spark many other comments supportive of my review from other readers and reviewers. But yes, I’ve seen such thing. Like most people who do reviews I have a long list, so at times, especially if the genre is not one I usually read, I’ll reject it but will make suggestions, if I can think of other reviewers who might be interested. Abusive behaviour is unacceptable.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Pingback: #Bookblogger bashing: in the end, you’re only hurting yourself #MondayBlogs | Rosie Amber | Just Olga

  24. You mean there’s a reader out there who might not like my books? Really. How bizarre.

    Seriously though, Terry & Rosie, great post. As a writer sometimes (very occasionally, rarely, in fact, almost never, honestly …) on the receiving end of a less-than-stellar review, I have nothing but respect and support for the reviewers/bloggers who give up their time to read my humble offerings.

    Rosie’s Review Team is perhaps my all-time fave review site. Now, where do I stand to pick up my next highly deserved 5*? 🙂

    Thanks guys, for your support of the struggling indie author.

    Liked by 3 people

  25. Thank you, Terry and Rosie, for putting a spotlight on this kind of behaviour! I was appalled when I read of the experience of The Happy Meerkat last week on her blog. I, myself, have had a few times when an author has disliked my review but it has never gone beyond a few snarky remarks. Authors need to realize that book bloggers are a gift and should be cherished, not bullied. Anytime an author behaves in such a deplorable manner, it put all of us in a bad light. As my grandmother used to say all the time, “If you can’t stand the heat, get the **** out of the kitchen!”

    Another bad behaviour I’m noticing is book bloggers bashing other book bloggers. I know it’s competitive out there but c’mon! You’re only making yourself look like an arse and probably losing out on reading an excellent book in the process.

    MRS N

    Liked by 2 people

  26. A great post ladies and I also really enjoyed reading the comments. I don’t have the fortitude to be a book blogger. I just can’t believe that people are so rude and ungracious.

    Liked by 3 people

    • If I wasn’t a writer I think I would be one, because I really like doing my book blog. I’d probably be super-snarky and hard to please, and get trolled off the Richter scale 😉 😀

      Liked by 2 people

      • Ha Ha – I can imagine you in online scraps 😀 I love writing the reviews but I wouldn’t like the pressure of being a bona fide book blogger. I’d probably have to keep having a lie down in a darkened room to cope with all the complainers.

        Liked by 1 person

  27. Reblogged this on graemecummingdotnet and commented:
    As an author, I know the value of reviews. The more you get, the more chance your book will get some attention. Not all reviews are good – that can be for a range of reasons, including that of personal taste. When I write a story, I don’t have any expectation that it will appeal to everyone. If I did, I’d be kidding myself and setting myself up for a fall. As it happens, by writing a novel that crosses genres, I know I’ve created a barrier already.
    Against that background, I’m grateful for a review of any kind. Even the reviewer who complained how bad Ravens Gathering was (and didn’t get it even after the second read!) deserves appreciation for not only bothering to read my book, but to take time out to comment on it. Time is our most valuable commodity, and we shouldn’t underestimate that.
    With that in mind, it’s disappointing that a book blogger has reached a point where they have to write this. This community is valuable and should be supported. Start now, by reading what Terry has to say

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Excellent post Terry and Rosie and what brilliant and enlightening comments! I owe bloggers a huge debt of gratitude. Reviews are vitally important to anyone who wants to create the best book they can. I try to view any criticism as constructive and usually the reviewer – when genuine – has made a valid and helpful point.
    Listening to the awesome Nora Roberts talk at the RWA in New York a couple of years ago, someone asked, ‘Which of your many novels is your best book?’
    Without missing a beat Nora replied. ‘My next one!’
    I rest my case.

    Liked by 2 people

  29. Reblogged this on Suffolk Scribblings and commented:
    It’s been a while since I’ve posted (sorry, I’m still working hard on my next book) and hadn’t planned to post but this piece from Terry on Rosie’s blog deserves to be spread far and wide.
    If you are an author and you ask someone for their honest opinion of your work, don’t get upset if they give it. Book bloggers are treasures. They should be encouraged, praised, and if possible red wine and chocolates. These wonderful people give up their time, for free, to review books. And as every book is a piece of art, whether they like it or not is subjective (if you don’t believe me, look up the one-star reviews on your favourite book).
    A well-thought out review is a gift, whether positive or negative, and if you don’t think you can react well to somebody not liking your book, then you should think long and hard about publishing it at all.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. Yes. Yes. Yes. I RARELY give out 5 star reviews, I think my ‘average’ on goodreads is like 3.7 or something. But doesn’t that make it all the more exceptional when you do get a 5* review. Frankly, I think 4* is much more realistic because we all learn and improve with age.

    But that is largely by the by. I got slated for a recent review I wrote – which was actually glowing praise – I’d genuinely given something 5* (because I liked it fair and square) and some random person took offence to how I’d described the author’s style. Couldn’t believe it.

    It’s so common its unreal. It’s disgusting, and people wonder why they don’t sell books with attitudes like that.

    Reviewers are diamonds. Everyone ought to treat you like such.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Well said, Terry! and thanks for sharing it with us, Rosie. I couldn’t agree more. Luckily I haven’t been bashed (yet) but have accepted it comes with the territory. I’ve never seen a review from our group that has not been instructive and kindly written. Wish that were the same for reviews of scientific papers, which gave me a thick skin.
    A very good post I hope a lot of people will read.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Many thanks to everyone who has read, commented, retweeted, shared and/or this important (though I say so myself!) post so far. If it makes one author think twice before complaining….! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  33. First reaction on reading Terry’s post ‘Incredible!’ (sad headshake), two minutes later ‘Actually, not incredible at all in current climate’ (even sadder headshake). To add to Rosie’s introductory comments, many bloggers/reviewers give up their time to read books, write reviews (not easy) and provide valuable feedback often in a diplomatic way – all for no payment. Hats off to you all!

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  34. Some great comments here. And a wonderful post. Although I’m sorry that any of you have dealt with this. I think, in general, it is not in anyone’s best interest to have a temper tantrum online about any subject. It will always make that person look bad in the end. As far as book reviews, there are trolls out there who will leave bad reviews just to be cruel. It’s happened to some friends of mine. But book bloggers? No. Not that I’ve seen. This is ridiculous and unacceptable behavior.

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  35. Wow. I don’t understand how writers can get mad when there mistakes are pointed out. This gives you a chance to correct the problems. I’m not published but write on Wattpad and find reader comments very helpful. I make a lot of mistakes. So reader comments help.

    Like

    • It’s not just mistakes, Asha. Technical errors can be fixed. But sometimes the writing itself just isn’t very good; liking to do something doesn’t necessarily mean you have a great aptitude for it, alas. However, sometimes it seems like every new writer considers him/herself worth of being the next NYT bestseller, sometimes, and they don’t like to hear that they’re perhaps not that good.

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