The Shell by Tony Riches

The ShellThe Shell by Tony Riches

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Firstly the book cover is very striking, the eye looking deeply out at you, connects to the book in several places. You never know just who is watching you. This story is about the kidnapping of Lucy a British tourist on holiday in Mombasa, Kenya with her husband Steve. They ignore the safety warnings about not leaving the hotel beach and sadly are the victims of desperate people who see rich westerners as an easy money source.

Although the British Government policy is not to pay ransoms, I’m sure any family who have a member kidnapped will do anything to get them safely back. This book resonates with many actual kidnapping cases in war-torn and dangerous parts of the world.

Lucy is taken first by boat and then lorry towards to border with Somalia. It is believed she is taken by rebels sympathetic to the local Pokomo tribes. The Pokomo are a settled agricultural people who constantly fight over land and water with the nomadic cattle-herding Orma peoples. Mixed with this the political unrest caused by enforced borders and there is a ticking time-bomb in the whole area.

Lucy’s husband was knocked unconscious in the kidnap attack and wakes on the beach to find Lucy gone. With the help of the hotel staff, the local police and the British Consulate the search for Lucy begins. Lucy is taken on a frightening journey and must rely on her inner strength and common sense to make the most of every opportunity that presents itself to her.

The main kidnapping story is supported by a lot of back story in the form of day dreams, memories and dreams from both Steve and Lucy. I did enjoy reading about the tribal conflicts and how the peoples of Kenya lived and dealt with everyday incidents. So much of the real people’s lives are lost in news reports which focus on the violence and horror. Tourism brings much money to poor countries but it also brings new problems which affect the balance of nature and those who live a simpler life.

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Find a copy of the book here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Tony will join us tomorrow on the blog as our guest author do come back and find out more about him and his writing.

What book have you read multiple times? Features Ender’s Game

So I recently threw out the question, “What book have you read multiple time and keep going back to and why?” http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-5zp
Author Charles E Yallowitz chose Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card.
Charles said “Well, Ender’s Game is the big one I go back to.”
375802

I like the characters of Ender’s Game because most of them have some depth.  This was one of the first books I read that had realistically flawed characters.  There were no pure heroes or clear-cut villains, which I found to be a curiosity since I typically read pure fantasy and comic books before I got into that one.  It helped that the world had a thorough history that I still find fascinating.  I’m sure not to read it too often since I figure it’ll take the magic away if I read it more than once a year.

Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card, Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

What about you? What book do you go back to multiple times?

Rosie’s Book Review Challenge – A review by Karen

Today we have a review from Book review challenger Karen. She blogs at http://mytrainofthoughtson.wordpress.com/

Rosie's Book Review Challengers 1

Karen chose to read “Jaded” by Kristy Feltenberger-Gillespi

Jaded - Kristy Feltenberger - Gillespi

Jaded – Kristy Feltenberger – Gillespi

Here is Karen’s review.

My Opinion

The book introduces you to Jade, a 16-year-old girl living in Nirvana, Virginia. Her dying grandmother Ruby asks her to secretly get her diary, to read, and then destroy it. Life could not be more complicated as her 17th birthday is approaching, and some things are no longer as they seemed… It is a story of not losing oneself, finding out who to trust, and to survive. I will not tell you more about the story than shown in the Goodreads plot description. This would spoil the fun of reading this book yourself.

With Jaded, Kristy Feltenberger Gillespie has created a compelling story of enduring in a strictly ruled community, solving mysterious incidents, and young love. Jaded is an entertaining, gripping, and fast read, making you want to read more. I was drawn into the story right away. I felt close to Jade and everything that happened. All relevant characters became so real that I ‘related’ to them. Jaded is daunting as strictly ruled communities do exist, consider the Berlin Wall (dividing Berlin in two parts until 1989) or some sects who oppress their members and/or children even today. Jaded is the promising start of the Nirvana trilogy. [Hunted: Nirvana Series 2 and Blinded: Nirvana Series 3 are coming soon.]

This is a book to read again.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

What Book Have You Read Multiple Times?

I was chatting to a friend about books yesterday and we discussed books that we have read multiple times. My friend has read “The Go Between” by L.P. Hartley many times, reading it from the points of view of different characters and finding lots of new points and enjoyment from the reading.

258079

The Go Between by LP Hartley – the first line is “The past is another country, they do things differently there”.  My friend first studied it for her A level course and loved it – She has revisited it four or five times since then and sympathised with different characters each time.  “It perfectly captures the carefree days of summer, the loss of innocence, the British class system, the rising temperatures and building tensions of a doomed love affair.  Read it.  It’s one of my favourites.”
22136898
My friend has also read “The Diary of a Provincial Lady” by E. M Delafield.  Screamingly funny.  Written in a diary format for a magazine originally (like Bridget Jones).  All about keeping up appearances – it is a glimpse of life for a middle class woman in the 1930s.  She has bought it for lots of friends. How about you? Have you a book that you have bought for friends because it was so good?

I’ve read the Harry Potter series numerous times and I always find something I’ve forgotten or a detail I remember enjoying.

Diagon Alley, Warner Bros. Studio Tour, London.

Diagon Alley, Warner Bros. Studio Tour, London.

Why don’t you tell me about a book or series that you have read multiple times and we will feature it here on the blog. I’ll let you take the floor and tell the readers about the book and what it is that has made you go back and re-read the book or books.

Artists drawing of Dobby at the Warner Bros Studio Tour, London.

Artists drawing of Dobby at the Warner Bros Studio Tour, London.

Fill in the form below, telling me the Title and Author of your favourite book that you’ve read multiple times and briefly explain why, add your contact details and I’ll come back to you and we can feature the book as long as it is suitable for the blog. No cheating and promoting your own books though!

How To Promote and Market Your Book by Madi Preda

How To Promote and Market Your BookHow To Promote and Market Your Book by Madi Preda

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I’m going to start with a quote “You can write the most wonderful book in the world. But if people don’t know about your book they won’t know to buy it.”~Madi Preda

Madi has written a must-read book. This handbook is crammed full of useful ideas, step-by-step instructions and case studies full of helpful information.

Writing a book is a HUGE dream for most people and achieving that dream is like climbing a mountain. Now it’s easier to write a book and with self-publishing, hitting the button and seeing your book takes minutes. Yet this is only the beginning. Publishing a book, Madi says, is like “Opening a Small Business”, and a writer needs to look at marketing themselves as the product rather than just focusing on the book. Readers follow authors not their books. Just think about some of the great writers and let that statement sink in.

There is a great piece written for this book by book reviewer Lynn Worton which I really appreciated. Madi and Lynn encourage authors to make book reviewers and book bloggers feel special because they are an important part of book sales. This just backs up my recent book review challenge series where I promoted the need for more book reviews.

Even if you haven’t self-published, publishers no longer take your book and do everything else for you while you sit back and write the next, authors are expected to market their own books and there are a whole world of ideas and ways to do this inside this gem of a book. I don’t hesitate to give it 5*’s and it should be a part of any writer’s promotional plans.

Find a copy of this book on Smashwords or Barnes and Nobel

View all my reviews on Goodreads

Madi will be our guest author on the blog tomorrow, do come back and find out more about her work.

Rosie’s Book Review Team #RBRT Susan reviews BioKill by Stuart Handley

I am absolutely thrill to be posting this review by Rosie’s Book Review Team member Susan Molloy. She blogs at www.susanmariemolloy.com

Rosie's Book Review team 1

Susan chose to review “BioKill” by Stuart Handley.

22428451

Here is her review.

“BioKill” by Stuart Handley is novel bursting with intrigue, action, a terrorist cell, biological warfare, electrifying chases, lusty scenes, murder, mutilation, a cat fight, government subterfuge, escape, humor, and remarkable characters in an extraordinary plot.

 

While a terrorist cell conspires bioterrorism in the United States, Matt Lilburn, an American special agent with Homeland Security, finds himself on the case, along with the British Dr. Evangeline Crawston and a slew of memorable protagonists ranging from a tentative neighbor lady, to the virtually hilarious gang of the five Bloods, the bizarre chief of Homeland Security, the owners of an aviation business, and, of course, the terror cell inmates comprised of Bomani, Bashir, and Yusuf, just to name a very few of the rich cast of personalities.

 

The author is astute in his use of scene-changing within the novel. He cleverly and seamlessly moves his story, chapter to chapter, from Brooklyn, to England, and to places within the United States with such deft smoothness that the reader easily follows the action without questioning or backtracking to previous pages to re-read.  Indeed, whereas one chapter may be taking place in Brooklyn and the next in London and later, on a pig farm in New England, Stuart Handley ties each scene so well to another it’s as if the entire novel is akin to a quilt of individual blocks with no visible seams at all.

 

The players in the novel are real and well-developed, and where necessary, the author gives them accents and vocal modulations.  For example, Alessio enunciates his accent well: “I see you ‘ave brought a friend . . . I canna but try.”  We can hear neighbor Bonny as she talks to the police: “I was gonna get back on the phone and tell you to . . . bust those A-rabs . . . I see you brought the whole dang station wid you!”  We get indignant along with blonde Timothy the caterer/waiter as he “let out his own shriek” when he exclaims that he “’ordered lilac-colored napkins, lilac, not … blue.”  Timothy owns and operates The Galloping Caterers, and I could not help to give Timothy a slight, albeit faux, British accent in my mind to go along with his hissy fit, because the name The Galloping Caterers reminds me of the late British gourmand Graham Kerr of The Galloping Gourmet.  And when the “lucky” five Bloods found the red Nissan Maxima and attempted to drive it, the manual transmission threw them for a hilarious loop: “Yo man, I seen on the movies – this car had one of those things and you got to push something in with your foot to make it go . . .”

 

Yet, there was something so real and creepy when the members of the terrorist cell, Bomani, Bashir, and Yusuf spoke.  “Yusuf and I go to a cattle auction”  “ . . . when we have finished our work for Allah . . . we return to our home and assimilate ourselves back into Western society.”  Their voices and personalities are real and wicked, and Stuart Handley captures this flawlessly. Bomani, in particular, has a distinct voice in using variances in verb usage and not uttering contractions.

 

I enjoy Stuart’s writing style.  It is very vivid, descriptive and intelligent.  He uses foul language sparsely, as in those moments when characters are so totally shocked or frustrated that a four-letter word slips out.  Lusty scenes are tasteful and allow the reader to envision all the naughty little details within the imagination.  Stuart’s background in livestock production and an inspector for the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), et al gives authority to his novel.

 

There are a few instances within the novel where the author (who is from New Zealand) moves from American English to British English, such as “bonnet” for a car “hood,” “petrol tank” instead of “gas tank,” “mobile” for “cell phone,” “air-sock” for “wind sock,” “windscreen” for “windshield,” and a technical description of a helicopter’s speed measured in miles per hour, when airspeed is actually measured in knots.  I caught the aviation-related points immediately, since I have a long background and career in the aviation field.  It stuck out for me.  Yet, I believe it all will not take away from the story for most readers.

 

Admittedly, this is the first novel in this genre that I have read.  I was not disappointed at all.  Moreover, I cannot say enough positive statements about “BioKill.”  It produces non-stop action; it lays out a very real and plausible evil; it brings a little lightness to round out the reality; and it makes the reader think, laugh, and become more aware of contemporary events.

 

I highly recommend “BioKill” by Stuart Handley, and if I rated this novel on a five-star scale, I would give it six stars.

 

Yes; it’s that good.

Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Good Deeds Challenge, Year 2 Week 14

Welcome to my second Year of Good Deeds, a challenge I set myself during April 2013. I decided to do at least one Good Deed a day for a whole year, now I an into my second year.

New Good DeedsDuring my week I’ll also being updating you on My Kindness Challenge which I’m also doing. I read about a new challenge to make the world a better place to live in. “Speak Kind Words, Receive Kind Echoes” see the inspiration on  The Kindness blog . During my learning process I’m donating money to charity for my slip-ups to make me work harder to achieve results. I earn no money from any of my book reviews, so having little to spare should focus my mind.

This week I’ve been doing the following;

July 20th – Had a lovely day at home, catching up with all my reading and writing reviews. Today I was reading Wild Water by Jan Ruth

July 21st – My last morning of the school year, volunteering. I wished all the children good luck in their new classes and Good Deeds received: Had some lovely gifts from the appreciative teachers.

July 22nd – Launched my side of the Romancing September Across The World Tour, a tour I co-host with Stephanie Hurt who is based in the US. We will be promoting Romance books throughout September. This evening had a long walk and picked up litter.

July 23rd – Donated money to a charity working to prevent hunger, who were cycling for charity. Had a really lovely comment today, my Good Deeds have making people aware of the Good Deed opportunities around, so much so that this wonderful human being said he felt I would be disappointed if he passed by a chance to do a Good Deed. Just one Good Deed a day will make our world a better place, let’s hear some more of your Good Deed tales.

July 24th – Romancing September bookings have been slow today, so e-mailed a few authors to ask if they would be interested. Delighted to hear that a  copy of Aesop’s Secret by Claudia White has arrived for a young reviewer who is going to read and review the book for us. Helped out a friend with cricket tea advice.

July 25th – Have finished reading Round and Round by Terry Tyler which was released this week.

Ok, what just happened? Romancing September in now completely booked! It was utter madness this afternoon, bookings were coming at me thick and fast. Authors from The Harper Impulse range found out about the tour and wham! It was fully booked. Great to have all the support ladies and gentlemen, yes we have a guy who’s promoting his book too! Day 21 Nic Tatano will be promoting his book It Girl

July 26th – The Kindness challenge has been up and down this week. I did have a good chat with both my Mum and Dad about concerns they have for my nephews. One has a girlfriend which they disapprove of, and my suggestions to leave it be and let it work itself out are falling on deaf ears. Another nephew has fallen in to a worrying depression, I don’t think my parents live near enough or have a close enough relationship with him, to throw in strong advice and accusations. These were some difficult conversations and left me mulling over possibilities and being very aware of the need to listen well.

This evening I felt in need of a de-clutter, school has finished for the summer and the house is cluttered with school uniform and school books that need sorting for next year. I discovered some Christmas presents which I’m grateful for, but will never use, so I will pass them to the charity shop when I next go. I even filed my tax return, lifting a weight from my shoulders.

So that is my week. What Good Deeds have you done this week? Do tell me below, I’m sure if you think about it you have. Being aware of your deeds will bring more to the forefront.

Rosie.

 

Rosie’s Book Review Challenge – A review from Susan

Today I bring you a review from Susan. She blogs at http://www.gardenofedenblog.com/

Rosie's Book Review Challengers 1

Susan chose to review “The Heart of Albion” by Sue Vincent and Stuart France

21316750

Here is her review.

Extraordinary, in a word! ‘Unusual’ for another, and definitely original and thought provoking.
It begins with the fable of Jack and the Beanstalk which I was happy to revisit. I appreciated the psychological insight given by the two adventurers, Wen and Don as they discuss it. Fairy tales and fables, myths and legends contain hidden meanings and it is in this vein that their journey begins.
Wen and Don set off in the Silver Bullet (their car) with map in hand to find Albion somewhere in Devon; or so I was led to believe in the beginning. They are often in conversation making perceptive and imaginative leaps linking ancient tales with contemporary lives.
There is much play on words where e.g. the same word has two distinct meanings. ‘Cleave’ can mean as in ‘cling to’, or to ‘cleave in half’. From their discussions of words inter alia we’re led into magical tales in which the trials and tribulations of those in the tales are interwoven with their current journey. I enjoyed the many associations and amplifications on words and their deft dealing with the opposites, which are not exclusive to each other but are two sides of the same coin.
Poor Father Fish (who may pre-figure Arthur) becomes ill with longing for the maiden who appeared to him in a dream. In order to find her, he undergoes many impossible tasks. He faithfully fulfils them with friend and foe always accompanying him. Against all odds or, because of them, his mission is finally achieved. He has to search the whole of Albion for her. I was reminded of Psyche’s tasks set by Eros’ mother, also impossible tasks, but her love for Eros and her determination to be re-united with him, is the glue.
Many churches are visited, patterns are perceived dimly and the point is made that ‘… we think we see them, then maybe not – difficult, effort, which is why we avoid them’.
There are pearls interspersed throughout. I liked Don’s words: ‘if we struggle to see things that are staring us in the face in the present, how much more difficult it is to be accurate with the past and even with what we like to call our past’.
The authors paraphrase Heraclitus whose original words I believe were: ‘No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it’s not the same river and he’s not the same man’.
I’m glad they brought out that the word ‘silent’ contains the same letters as ‘listen’ and note that they say ‘listen in silence’ and not necessarily ‘listen to silence’.
I enjoyed travelling through Yorkshire and different parts of England, a land of such beauty and history, symbolism and legend. There are beautiful photographs interspersed throughout. The authors’ knowledge of myth and history made this an engaging and psychological tale, in spite of its sometimes steam of consciousness writing … or so it seemed to me .. with endless … as pauses.
I would give this a 4*.
Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com

Guest Author TJ Therien

Today our guest is TJ Therien author of yesterday’s book The Scrolls of Scion: The Dark Queen Rising. Here is a link to my post. http://wp.me/p2Eu3u-5tO

TJ Therien

Let’s find out more about TJ.

First I would like to thank Rosie for having me here and thank her for reading and reviewing my debut novel. I really do appreciate her taking the time out of her busy schedule for an obscure independent author.

 

1) Where is your home town?

I was born in East York and raised in North York, cities which no longer exist, having been absorbed by the Megacity of Metropolitan Toronto when it was created. I have also lived in Calgary, Alberta, Perry Sound, Ontario, Montreal, Quebec and made my home in the Eastern Townships of Quebec for most of the last decade before returning to Toronto at the end of June this year in order to promote my writing in an English Province and large urban market.

2) You’ve climbed a very steep hill to become an author, would you care to share some of your journey with the readers?

I started my journey to become an author as an almost illiterate drop out at age 15. I could fill out a standard job application, but not a long form application, or an application that deviated from the standard set up. I basically knew what boxes to put the few words I did know. I quickly realized my job prospects would be severely limited if I did not learn how to read and write so I began to self-educate myself by picking up a book and a dictionary and referencing every word I did not know and referencing every word in the definition I did not understand. It was a very long and tedious process. I began writing Poetry because at the time I perceived it to be looser in structure than prose. That was when my love for the written word began.

3) What made you choose to write a fantasy book?

Fantasy was not the genre of my choosing for my first novel, it just kind of happened. I had tried to write a novel on several occasions mostly in the vein to Kerouac’s stream of conscious or in the genre of Romance, but never saw anything through to completion. In 2013 I decided to take part in NaNoWriMo. I didn’t have an outline for a story or even much of an idea so I fell back on a love of mine which is the genre of Fantasy; I figured Fantasy would allow me to fly by the seat of my pants. I prepared myself by making a childish map with the Paint program on my computer and writing down a few names. I then gave myself 30 prompts based on those names and locations and the rest is history. I posted the original draft as I wrote it on one of my old blogs “Fables, Fallacies and Short Form Fiction” The story took on a life of its own and the rest is history. Although the story itself was written in 30 days, it took nearly six-months of edits and rewrites to put the depth into the characters and the world.

4) How did you go about researching information for your book?

Here’s the thing, other than researching the names I would use I actually did no research for the book. It was completely improvised and drew upon my youth playing Dungeons & Dragons and the fantasy I read when I was older. I am a big Tolkien fan, but I did not want to tread on the creation of such a great. The Races I’ve chosen are all staple races in the fantasy genre, although I have tried to give them all a unique twist. I would mention, as I am a History buff, especially where Ancient History is concerned, I did try to incorporate that knowledge in ways that suited the story.

5) Can you tell the readers why the Drow were driven to the Iron Hills?

Elves, as I have laid them out in my world are divided primarily among three classes, The High Elf, The Wood Elf and The Drow. Savage Elves in my book predate Elven culture and since they worshiped the old Gods they were never accepted. Back to the Drow now, they were basically a slave class of Elf forced to mine the earth and work the forges in the time when Elves still did these things, they were also used as a military arm due to their ability to blend in with shadows. The Drow, led by Lolth, the original Queen of the Drow and High Priestess of the Cult of the Spider led the Drow in revolt against their Elven Overlords and sided with the Orc in the Great War that took place five thousand years before my story begins. I should mention that while Lolth is a Goddess according to D & D mythologies, in my novel she is not a Goddess, but a Drow that had acquired unique magical powers. The revolt failed and the Elves basically committed genocide in the destruction of Sion (the capital city of the Drow at the time.) A handful of Drow (a few low level priestesses and their guard) escaped the massacre and found a home in the Iron Hills where they rebuilt their numbers through selective breeding.

6) Tell us about some of the other races of species in your book.

Well I am using staple Races of the Fantasy genre as I said previously; I wanted to give them a unique twist. So I made my Orcs intelligent and there culture is kind of a Shamanic culture that has a code of honor and they are not outright evil, but were driven into the Barrenlands by the Dwarves in what was basically a territorial dispute and this is what the Great War was primarily about. On the topic of Dwarves, Dwarven females do not have beards, but they started wearing false beards in the time of the Great War to protect them from rape and they continued to wear them even after the war had ended. Savage Elves worship the ancient gods as I have said which were animals seen in the constellations. Savage Elves exist primarily in animal form and live extremely long lives, Lord Arthfeal, the Lord of Bears existence predates the Great War.

7) Who are the ancient sages and what is their role?

Ah, now that is an interesting question. I did not want to have typical Wizards in my story, so I created the Sages, who are very old and wise beings that spend most of their lives acquiring knowledge and magic which they are reluctant to use. They are often referred to as the First Ones and they perceive each other as brother and sister, although I have never gone into their origin. Each Sage represents one of the races and one of the Elements. Their primary function is as the Advisors of Kings and the Ruling Classes of the separate Races.

8) What is a Drider?

A Drider is a creature that is half Drow and half spider, they are magically created and it is the ultimate form of punishment for a Drow to be transformed into one. It is a particularly cruel fate and the transformation is very painful. A Drider retains his Drow memories and magical abilities, but this too is part of the curse. When a Drow is transformed into a Drider they are exiled from Drow society. The rite to transform a Drow to Drider had not been performed since the time of Lolth, before the Great War until Rianon performs the rite upon Prince Maelgad in the opening scene of the book.

9) Are you working on the next book in the series?

I will be beginning the penning of the sequel to “Scrolls of Sion: Rise of the Dark Queen” “The Scrolls of Sion: Broken Bloodlines” November 1st 2014 and will use the same NaNoWriMo process. All future books in the “Scrolls” series will also be done in this fashion, although I don’t know how many books it will be in the end, my intention is to produce one book each year (to be released on May 25th  the following year) as long as I can keep the books interesting and relevant. I have other projects I am working on other than “Scrolls” that are not in the Fantasy genre including a Romance (“Forever: The First Epoch”) set in the Stone Age which I am hoping to finish writing and editing by the time NaNoWriMo starts. I also am working on a book of experimental Poetry entitled “Crossing Main.”

10) Where can readers find out more about you and where can they get your book? Is it still free on these sites?

Readers can find me at my new Primary blog “Inside the Poet’s Mind” and also on my blog devoted to “The Scrolls of Sion” which goes by the same name as the series. My books can be found on Smashwords, Barnes and Noble and the i-Store, although I can’t find me on the i-Store, books are being downloaded there. Like the Drow, “Scrolls” exists in shadow and secret in the world of “Apple.” I also have an anthology of Poetry (“Liars, Hypocrites & the Development of Human Emotion) available through the same retailers. I have decided to keep all my books free until I debut them on Amazon. I have not yet set a date for my Amazon launch, but it will be before November 1st and maybe as early as August 1st so those who haven’t taken advantage of this free offer, better hurry.

Thank you again Rosie for having me here on your Blog. I have enjoyed the experience and truly appreciate the exposure.

Links to Blogs

http://insidethepoetsmind.wordpress.com/

http://thescrollsofsion.wordpress.com/

Links to Book

scrolls fFINAL 3

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/434284

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-scrolls-of-sion-t-j-therien/1119459677

Thank you TJ and good luck with the next book.

Rosie’s Book Review Challenge – A Review from Madi

Today Book Review Challenger Madi has reviewed our book. Find Madi at http://authorspromotion.wordpress.com/

Rosie's Book Review Challengers 1

Madi chose “Kings and Queens” by Terry Tyler

Kings and Queens - Terry Tyler

Kings and Queens – Terry Tyler

Here is her review.

Kings and Queens by Terry Tyler.

“In this book Terry Tyler draws her own story of Henry VIII, setting it in the modern day.
Harry Lanchester is a property magnate and will amaze the readers with his personality and behaviour. He is a decadent libertine who gets exactly what he wants, his way and divorces or “beheads” his multiple wives and mistresses when he is tired of them. Quite a cold and sometimes childlike character, Harry is a self indulgent man and Terry, through his six wives’ points of view and his best friend Will Brandon describes him as often a pathetic figure. For me it was difficult to decide if I liked or I hated him.Readers will be caught up by King and Queens, a real page turner and saga through the Lanchester family dramas, betrayals and mayhem. For readers who know the story of Henry the VIII, Kings and Queens offers a new interpretation of the Tudor period at a modern level, proving that human nature doesn’t change over decades. Whether it is about a reign or just about a family business, people love and hate and are going through many of the same dramas today.”Find a copy here from Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com